mike@standardsmichigan.com | Standards Michigan

Author Archives: mike@standardsmichigan.com

Loading
loading...

ISO/TC 267 Facility Management

Click on image

The original University of Michigan regulatory advocacy enterprise was catalyst for persuading selected institutions, subject matter experts and education industry trade associations to participate in international codes and standards development (See ABOUT).  With a spend running at about $300 billion the education facilities industry ought to be at the meetings where the standard of care was being discovered and promulgated.

In 2010 the need was especially acute in the square footage devoted to research; where a trend toward offshoring research — and a significant revenue source for large research universities — was gathering pace.  Two years earlier that enterprise had already commented on the scope of the ISO/TC 276 Biotechnology committee (administered by the Deutsches Institut für Normung)  to remove the facility component in the committee scope.  Taking facility management out of a biotechnology standard was important because research square footage is expensive.  Not all nations — and local safety enforcement authorities — have the same safety regulations that provides a level playing field for competitive market participants in biotechnology research.   (See: ISO 276 Biotechnology).

University of Glasgow

In 2010 a new committee was formed — ISO/TC 267 Facility management — led by the BSI Group, and an internationally oriented subject matter experts from many countries who had extensive experience in designing, building, operating and maintaining the built environment for private industry.  Why not convey the perspective and lessons learned from the private sector into the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States (see our monthly US Census Bureau coverage)?    Collaboration with ANSI and the prospective US Technical Advisory Group administrator – the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) — was the first step.

This month, ISO  TC 267 has released several new work products; one of which is noteworthy for its prospect of providing discipline to the facility management profession in the US education facilities industry:

Facility management — Management systems — Requirements with guidance for use

From the document prospectus:

ISO 41001:2018 specifies the requirements for a facility management (FM) system when an organization:

a) needs to demonstrate effective and efficient delivery of FM that supports the objectives of the demand organization;

b) aims to consistently meet the needs of interested parties and applicable requirements;

c) aims to be sustainable in a globally-competitive environment.

The requirements specified in ISO 41001:2018 are non-sector specific and intended to be applicable to all organizations, or parts thereof, whether public or private sector, and regardless of the type, size and nature of the organization or geographical location. 

 Click here for the ISO announcement.  Click here for link to the IFMA announcement



All international standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to Click Here to login and help prepare user-interest comments on documents open to public review:

Issue: [11-33]

Category: Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

Link to legacy workspace 

ISO Focus January 2015 Anthony-Robben – Education Enterprise pp 33-37

ISO/TC 267 Project Kickoff Meeting | Berlin 2012

*With all due respect to all the world’s standards developers: One must be mindful of the claim that “academia is involved”.  In nearly all cases, academic faculty are aligned more closely with the Producer and General Interest stakeholder category rather than the User.  In other words, many academic faculty (as subject matter experts with Ph.D’s) are funded by manufacturers, insurers, labor and the conformity/compliance interest — the stakeholders who are, by design, opposed to the user interest.  Most standards developers struggle to recruit and retain pure user interests — whom we call the final fiduciary — on their technical committees.   As we explain in ABOUT, the fault does not lie with the standards developer — the fault lies with the education industry itself; the parabolic rise in the cost of education in the US being the proof. 

 

 

 

 

NFPA 3000 | Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events

The School of Athens

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is swiftly preparing a timely regulatory product — NFPA 3000 Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events — in response to the rise in active shooter incidents and the escalating impact of hostile events in all industries.   Many of these incidents occur in educational settings; hence our interest in promoting the participation of subject matter experts, individual school districts, colleges and universities and the many non-profit trade associations that service the education industry. 

Principal and Alternate Votes on the NFPA Technical Committee from educational institutions: Harvard School of Public Health,  Auburn University,  Missouri State University, University of Connecticut and Vanderbilt University  

This document will likely establish the standard of care for the prevention and management of these incidents.  It will provide the minimum criteria for the level of competence required for responders organizing, managing, and sustaining an active shooter and/or hostile event preparedness and response program based on the authority having jurisdiction’s (AHJ) function and assessed level of risk.  From the public announcement: (ANSI Standards Action January 12, 2018, Page 4):  

….[This consensus body] has been assembled in response to recent active shooter and hostile events of increasing magnitude occurring globally, which are resulting in tragic loss of life, as well as countless injuries. The very nature of these unpredictable, deadly events and the frequency of recurrence establishes the need for prompt dissemination of standards for preparedness and response. Moreover, the Council found that the urgency in addressing these serious safety concerns warranted the initiation of expedited standards development procedures.   The standard is being developed to address preparedness, planning, and response to cross-functional, multi-discipline, and cross-coordinated emergency events that are not already established by the NFPA. This includes provisions that establish criteria for the professional qualifications of those who are responsible for preparation, planning, exercising, and responding to cross-functional, cross-jurisdictional events. The standard is being processed as a Provisional Standard to ensure the prompt dissemination of new safety criteria….

The project’s prospectus is available at this link: NFPA Fact Sheet

An exposure draft was posted for public comment at this link: Public Input NFPA 3000    Standards Michigan submitted original public comment (click here).  The First Draft Report is now available at this link:  NFPA 3000 Next Edition.

Comments are due August 1st.

For more information about this document please feel free to contact Jenny Depew, Project Administrator at 617-984-7505 or jdepew@nfpa.org.

Standards Michigan will be monitoring the participation of individuals,  school districts, higher education institutions as well as many of the education industry trade associations whose members may be stakeholders in this NFPA product.   We will place NFPA 3000 along with all the other NFPA documents we follow on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone may join these teleconferences with login information in this link: (Open Door Login).

Issue [18-15]

Category: Public Safety, Risk Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben

 

ASCE | Minimum Design Loads For Buildings and Other Structures

Florida International University

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) — and its affiliate the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) —  develops a suite of ANSI-accredited standards that inform the standard of care for structural engineers, architects, and building code officials working in the built environment of the education industry and others.   Its standard — ASCE 7 -16 Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures — describes the means for determining dead, live, soil, flood, tsunami, snow, rain, atmospheric ice, earthquake, and wind loads, and their combinations for general structural design.   The 2022 revision is open for public comment.

Proposals are due June 30, 2018.  You may propose revisions to the ASCE 7 standard using the  ASCE 7 Change Proposal Form.  (You will need to set up a no-fee account).  Proposals to revise the ASCE 7 Standards must be submitted using this form and are to be submitted via email to Jon Esslinger, Director, Codes and Standards, at Jesslinger@asce.org.  More information about participating in the ASCE standards development process for this and other documents may be obtained from Jennifer Groupil (jgoupil@asce.org)  Additionally, the ASCE 7 Committee will be meeting next week in Denver.   The agenda for that meeting is linked below:

SEI ASCE 7 Main Committee Agenda | March 22 | Crowne Plaza Denver

The ASCE suite of standards is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door Teleconference every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.   We Click here to log in any Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time*.

Issue: [13-68]

Category: Architectural, Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben, Jack Janveja

* Link to previous work on this standard: (Legacy) Advocacy Project 13-68 .   Note that our primary interest in ASCE 7 was to advocate for, a) up-to-date and more granular identification of occupancy classes, and b) revisit loading requirements recognizing that education facilities presented lower load because fewer books were stored on site.  For example, many colleges and university “libraries” are now “media centers” with heavier books stored in off-site slab on grade facilities.  


 

Education Industry Construction Spend

Image credit: ESPN College Town

Update on the build-out of these “cities-within-cities” which,

when observed as a network, constitute a sovereign nation.

 

The value of construction put in place in March 2018 by the US education industry proceeded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $73.1 billion, 0.1 percent (±2.5 percent) below the February 2018 estimate of $73.2 billion.  (This number does not include renovation and new construction in university-affiliated health care delivery enterprises).   The complete report is available at the link below:

https://www.census.gov/construction/c30/pdf/release.pdf

At this rate, the US education facilities industry (which includes colleges, universities, technical/vocational and K-12 schools, most university-affiliated medical research and healthcare delivery enterprises, etc.)  is the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.  Overall — including construction, energy, custodial services, furnishings, security. etc., — the non-instructional spend plus the construction spend of the US education facilities is approximately $300 billion per year.  Cash throughput at this scale draws comparisons with the $223 billion annual revenue of Berkshire-Hathaway (a Fortune #2 corporation) and the $304 billion national gross domestic product of Denmark.

Construction cameras overlooking construction activity at US universities

(more cameras coming)

We encourage the education facilities industry to contribute to the accuracy of this monthly report by responding the US Census Bureau’s data gathering contractors.

We host weekly teleconferences to discuss our advocacy priorities every Wednesday, 11:00 – 11:30 AM Eastern Time.   Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences by clicking here.

Next teleconference on this topic: May 2nd.  Detailed information about our advocacy agenda is available to our email subscribers.    You are welcomed to join this list by sending an email to bella@standardsmichigan.com.


From our archives:

 

NIST | Federal Technology Transfer

NIST Solar Testbed

The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) are co-leading the Lab-to-Market Cross Agency Priority goal, part of the recently released President’s Management Agenda(link is external). To accelerate these efforts, NIST has launched an initiative to improve federal technology transfer.

The education industry – particularly large research universities — are likely stakeholders in this discussion  – which NIST will expand outside the policy-making precincts of Washington DC.   Standards Michigan collaborates with the American National Standards Institute on issues of this nature.

Comments are due July 30th.   Ahead of this deadline a series of meetings will be hosted by NIST — both online and on-site — from May 17 through May 31.   See the the first page of the Federal Register Notice [Docket Number: 180220199–819–01] for more information.

All NIST activity is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences; every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time which are open to everyone.  Click here to log in.

 

Issue: [18-122]

Category: US Department of Commerce, Public Policy

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Paul Green

Related posts:

NIST | Standards Curricula Program

National Technology Transfer & Advancement Act

History of the American National Standards Institute

IBC | Healthcare Facilities

We follow the development of safety and sustainability concepts in the agenda of the International Code Council (ICC) Group A Committee Action Hearings that took place April 15 to 25, 2018 in Columbus, Ohio.   A batch of public input (strike-and-bold/redlines) regarding healthcare facilities for the 2021 edition of the International Building Code (IBC) is linked below:

Healthcare Proposals Group A I-2 12-8-2017 (2)

Generally speaking, the healthcare facilities affiliated with large research universities are to be built to the same standard as healthcare facilities everywhere else.  We only point out that there are two differences that might be brought to bear upon the development of the next revision to the IBC:

  • University-affiliated healthcare enterprises tend to be the destination for patients that need specialized care.  The destination of last resort, so to say, because those enterprises have physicians engaged in leading-edge therapies, and therefore a different (typically, higher) risk profile than most healthcare enterprises.
  • Essential utility supplies — water, power, telecommunications, etc. — can be complicated by the character of the utilities of the host municipality serving the perimeter of the campus; essentially a city-within-a-city.

All other safety and sustainability concepts are the same, as an examination of the redlines linked above should reveal.

Because the Group A Hearings is such an large undertaking,  breakout committees administered by ICC staff have been preparing public input for presentation at the hearings.   Several months of work by the healthcare committee is linked below:

2021 ICC Group A Healthcare Committee Proposal Administration

Standards Michigan encourages user-interest subject matter experts in the education industry to participate in the ICC Code Development process (Click here).  On concepts specific to healthcare facilities you may also contact Kimberly Paarlberg (kpaarlberg@iccsafe.org) the chairperson of the ICC healthcare committee.

The entire ICC suite of codes and standards is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.   Click here to log in.

Issue [17-229]

Category: Architectural, Healthcare Facilities


ASHRAE 62.1 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — which specifies minimum ventilation rates and other measures for new and existing buildings that are intended to provide indoor air quality that is acceptable to human occupants and that minimizes adverse health effects.  Recently released Addendum i contains significant changes to the scope of this document which are now open for public review and can be accessed  on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)

Comments are due May 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 and any other of its consensus documents.   The ASHRAE suite is a swiftly moving suite which effectively sets the standard of care for environmental air systems in education and healthcare facilities.  Many of its committees meet twice a year at various locations around the US; the next Annual conference to be hosted in Houston, June 23-27.   We encourage workpoint subject matter experts in the Houston area — i.e. design, construction and O&M tradespersons working in education and healthcare campus HVAC shops — to attend this conference and sit in on the meetings of ASHRAE 62.1 (or any other technical committee) to observe how leading practice is discovered.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


April 21, 2018

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  These can be found on Pages 36 through 83 of ANSI Standards Action or at ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)   The changes are non-trivial; a sample of three of them summarized below:

Addendum g: HVAC requirements for minimally occupied spaces

Addendum h:  The standard may be applied to both new and existing buildings but its provisions are not primarily intended to be applied retroactively when the standard is used as a mandatory regulation or code.

Addendum z: Tabulation of requisite ventilation required at the outdoor air intake for many systems.

There are 15 more changes in the batch most recently released.  These specifics will find their way into construction documents and commissioning agreements and operations and maintenance budgets.

Comments are due April 22nd.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to our ASHRAE 62.1 Workspace

 


September 5, 2017

University of Michigan Ross School of Business

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1b-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum responds to increasing requests for more simplified table for ventilation rate procedure of the standard. It contains a simplified ventilation rate table in Informative Appendix D for use in existing buildings where information for calculating minimum ventilation using Normative Appendix A for multiple spaces is often unavailable.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1d-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum deletes Informative Appendix D (Rationale for Minimum Physiological Requirements for Respiration Air Based on CO2 Concentration). Appendix D first appeared in 62-1989. Its purpose was to explain the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide in spaces. It is based on data from the 1950’s. Newer information is available. The committee is aware of misuse and confusion caused by the information in its present form and prefers to delete this misused appendix now. The committee may add back relevant informative guidance that assists with implementation of the standard in the next version of the standard.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1f-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) The so-called “Multiple Spaces Equation” is very difficult to use, especially for variable volume systems for which there are an infinite number of scenarios with varying airflow, occupancy, supply air temperature, etc., all of which affect system ventilation efficiency. 62.1 includes two options for calculating system ventilation efficiency, a prescriptive approach using Table 6.2.5.2 and a more fundamental approach in Normative Appendix A. This proposed addendum replaces the table approach with two formulas, one used to determine system ventilation efficiency (Ev) and one used to determine minimum primary airflow setpoint intended to be used for VAV systems.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2i-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would make explicit that placing a new fan in a kitchen or bathroom in an existing dwelling unit can address the airflow deficit that would otherwise have existed through Section A3. This has been assumed to be true, but has not previously been made explicit. This proposed change would make this condition more transparent to users.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2j-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would explicitly allow existing buildings to use a branch-circuit overcurrent device as an override even if it is not dedicated to only the ventilation fan in recognition that running a new circuit for the fan in an existing home is not always feasible.

Comments are due October 8th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

FASB | Not-for-Profit Update

We follow, but do not advocate in, a suite of consensus standards developed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) — among them, documents that discover and recommend best financial management practice for not-for-profit organizations common in almost all of the US education industry.

Today, we simply pass on an announcement posted on the FASB website about a June 15th webcast during which there will be some content that would interest financial professionals in the education industry:

JUNE 15 FASB WEBCAST FOR PRIVATE COMPANIES & NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Stakeholders in the US education industry are encouraged to communicate directly with the FASB on any issue (Click here).

The FASB suite is a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences (every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time) which are open to the public.  Login information can be found in the link below:

Contact

Issue: [15-190]

Category: Finance, Administration & Management, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben,


 

IEC TC 3 | Identification and marking principles

Uppsala universitet

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) releases draft standards Committee Drafts for Votes (CDV’s) that are open for public review and comment; contingent upon coordination with national standards bodies such as USNC/IEC.   The IEC standards development process is noteworthy because, for the moment, it welcomes comments from the general public worldwide; contingent upon meeting IEC requirements for public comments that are not unlike the responsibilities of participants in other global standards development processes.

Now comes an opportunity to comment upon revisions to an existing standard covering the marking of electrical equipment.  The Secretariat for Technical Committee 3 is Sweden.  The strategic business plan for IEC TC 3 is linked below:

SMB/6311/R STRATEGIC BUSINESS PLAN (SBP)

The subject standard — IEC 61293 ED2: Marking of electrical equipment with ratings related to electrical supply — is primarily a product normative reference to other IEC technical committees when specifying the minimum ratings of any electric supply of equipment, sub-assemblies and components.  It is relevant to the design, operation, construction and maintenance of electrotechnology on the emergent #SmartCampus because electrical safety standards develop around concepts of both product safety and field installed safety.  It is relatively easy to certify electrical equipment safety in a factory; more difficult to assure the electrical safety of a field installation over its life-cycle.

Comments are due in Geneva by July 27th.  Because access to IEC redlines is “coordinated” we typically refer this the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (which meets twice online again on Tuesday, May 22nd — 15:00 Central European Time and 3:00 PM Eastern Time)  Of course, the IEC suite and all other international standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday at 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to join this teleconferences with the login information in this link (Click here)

Issue: [11-4]

Category: Electrical, Energy, #SmartCampus, Facility Asset Management

Contact: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Giuseppe Parise, Richard Robben

 

NSF 49 | Biosafety Cabinetry

The education industry provides one of the largest markets for biosafety cabinetry manufacturers — particularly large research universities, university-affiliated healthcare enterprises and K-12 science laboratories.   When new research square-footage is budgeted the effective cost of this equipment is often difficult to determine; not just in per-unit terms but the degree to which environmental air management systems are affected.

NSF International develops a consensus standard for this technology — NSF 49 Biosafety CabinetryThis Standard applies to Class II (laminar flow) biosafety cabinetry designed to minimize hazards inherent in work with agents assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3, or 4.  It also defines the tests that shall be passed by such cabinetry to meet this standard. NSF 49 includes basic requirements for the design, construction, and performance of biosafety cabinets that are intended to provide personnel, product, and environmental protection; reliable operation; durability and structural stability; cleanability; limitations on noise level; illumination; vibration; and motor/blower performance.   

Now comes a proposal for revising the requirements for electrical wiring documentation:  ANSI Standards Action Page 33

Comments are due May 27th.  The public may comment directly on the NSF Online Workspace and/or communicate directly with Allan Rose, (734) 827-3817, arose@nsf.org (with copy of comments to psa@ansi.org

Action in the NSF International suite of standards generally track on this page: (Click here).  The NSF International suite of standards are a standing item of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which are open to anyone.  Click here to log in.

Issue: [13-118]

Category: Risk Management, Occupational Health and Safety

Link to legacy workspace

 


February 28, 2018

Laboratory at University Leipzig (Institute of Chemistry) 1906

NSF 49 Biosafety Cabinetry applies to Class II (laminar flow) biosafety cabinetry designed to minimize hazards inherent in work with agents assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3, or 4.  It also defines the tests that shall be passed by such cabinetry to meet this standard. NSF 49 includes basic requirements for the design, construction, and performance of biosafety cabinets that are intended to provide personnel, product, and environmental protection; reliable operation; durability and structural stability; cleanability; limitations on noise level; illumination; vibration; and motor/blower performance.   

NSF 49 is undergoing revisions that are relevant to the teaching and research enterprises in the education industry:

RE: Average inflow velocity.  The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 42.  Comments are due March 25, 2018.

RE: Inflow canopy velocity alarms.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 98Comments are due March 11, 2018.  

RE: Interlocking with building environmental air systems.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 22Comments are due February 11, 2018.  

RE: Cabinetry exhaust.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Pages 38 – 40 Comments are due January 28, 2018.  

RE: Hood visibility criteria.   The strike and bold document for these revisions are accessible at this link: ANSI Standards Action Pages 35-36.  Comments are due January 14, 2018. 

The public may comment directly on the NSF Online Workspace. and/or communicate directly with Allan Rose, (734) 827-3817, arose@nsf.org (with copy of comments to psa@ansi.org

Action in the NSF International suite of standards generally track on this page: (Click here).  The NSF International suite of standards are a standing item of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which are open to anyone.  Login information is available in the link below:

Contact

Issue: [13-118]

Category: Risk Management, Occupational Health and Safety

University of Calcutta

Layout mode
Predefined Skins
Custom Colors
Choose your skin color
Patterns Background
Images Background