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National Electrical Code 2020

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National Electrical Code 2020

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

University of Michigan College of Engineering

The National Fire Protection Association has released the First Draft Report for all 19 technical committees writing the 2020 National Electrical Code.  All reports are available at the link below:

2020 National Electric Code Public Review

Comments are due August 30th. 

All NFPA Standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM — which are open to everyone (CLICK HERE to log in).   Because of Standards Michigan tenure in advocating the NFPA standards suite — we collaborate closely with IEEE SCC-18 — the committee that coordinates and harmonizes user-interest concepts in the NFPA and IEEE electrical safety standards suite.   We also collaborate closely with experts on the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times monthly.  The next online teleconference is scheduled for August 14th — at 15:00 in Central Europe and 3:00 PM Eastern Time in the Americas.  (CLICK HERE) to log in.

Several online collaboration sessions on all NEC articles have been scheduled.  See CALENDAR for date, time, agenda and login information.

 

Issue: [Various]

Category: Electrical, Telecommunications, Facility Asset Management, #SmartCampus

Contact:  Jim Harvey (jharvey@ieee.org), Mike Anthony (maanthony@ieee.org), Rich Robben (rrobben1952@gmail.com), Christel Hunter (chunter@cerrowire.com)

 


Posted March 24, 2018

Time to revisit the “design regulations” that govern

the power chain within healthcare facilities

We are now reviewing public input for the 2020 revision to NFPA 70 the National Electrical Code (NEC) on all Code-Making Panels and through various Task Groups set up by the NFPA ahead of the First Draft meetings in Hiltonhead, South Carolina in January 2018.

We are exploring the amount of easily obtainable branch circuit and feeder data in healthcare facilities to confirm or deny our hypothesis that the power chain — within a limited class of healthcare facilities — can be reduced in order to improve safety and advance sustainability in terms of reducing energy and material waste. The amount of money involved runs into tens of billions of reduced #TotalCostofOwnership annually.

We collaborate with IEEE Standards Association SCC18, the IEEE Industrial Applications Society, the IEEE Power Engineering Society,  the IEEE Technology & Engineering Management Society and the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (IEEE E&H), academic departments of several educational institutions and several of the many education industry trade associations.

One of the concepts that the original University of Michigan Plant Operations regulatory advocacy enterprise advocated for — beginning with the 1999 NEC — is revision of the feeder and branch circuit “design” guidance in NEC Chapter 2.   Recognizing the gathering pace of variable speed drives and LED-lighting installation that dramatically reduced power densities, our proposals were intended to place downward pressure on the over-building of educational facility power supply chains; explained in research the University of Michigan funded and catalyzed (Click here) and explained in broad terms in these videoclips: (Click here)

We are now turning our attention to exploring remedies for a similar condition in academic medical facilities; collaborating with the American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) and the  IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (IEEE E&H) to gather data for plug loads.

Plug Load Query

Several teleconferences are scheduled to pull together data driven concepts to present to the NEC technical committees during the 2020 revision cycle.   Dates, times and login information are available in the links below:

IEEE SCC18 National Electrical Code Teleconferences

Teleconferences | August 14, 2018

 

Contact:  Jim Harvey (jharvey@ieee.org), Mike Anthony (maanthony@ieee.org), Rich Robben (rrobben1952@gmail.com), Christel Hunter (chunter@cerrowire.com)

National Electrical Safety Code

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Several proposals recommending improvements to the 2017 National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) were submitted to the IEEE subcommittees drafting the 2022 revision of the NESC.   They are fairly technical and subtle in their implications for the advancement of safety and sustainability in campus power distribution systems.   Since some of the proposals deal with coordination with the National Electrical Code — which is now in the middle of its own 2020 revision cycle — we will place a review of these proposals on the agenda of the “NEC Markup” online teleconference scheduled for August 28th, 11 AM.   This work session will take place two days ahead of the deadline for comments on the 2017 National Electrical Code.  Anyone is welcomed to click in to this teleconference with the login information linked below:

NEC Markup

Keep in mind that that NESC is revised every 5 years at the moment.  The next steps in the 2022 NESC development will span across most of the next 12 months as the various subcommittees meet a prepare written response to public input and release those responses no later than July 1, 2019.  The complete schedule is linked below:

IEEE C2 National Electrical Safety Code 2022 Revision Schedule

Comments are due March 1, 2020. 

The subcommittee that coordinates standards action between the IEEE and NFPA suite of technical standards — IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 18 — will also be hosting worksessions in the coming months.   While those work sessions are generally closed to the public, some of the concepts will be open for discussion during any of the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities online committee meetings which meets 4 times monthly in Europe and the Americas.

IEEE E&H Committee

 

 


Posted July 12

With the balloting of the First Draft of the 2020 National Electrical Code (the NEC, a consensus document developed by the National Fire Protection Association) now completed, we turn our attention to the 2022 revision of the National Electrical Safety Code (te NESC, a consensus document developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers).*

We collaborate with the IEEE SCC-18 and the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee in developing safety and sustainability concepts unique to educational facilities — particularly the campuses of large research universities where the power systems are on the order of 25 to 250 connected MVA.    Power systems this large are unregulated by public service commissions because they are considered premises wiring by the NEC and considered to be on the customer side of the point of common coupling by investor-owned utilities who are.   Coupled with the NEC, the NESC sets the standard of care for all exterior campus power system design, construction and maintenance.

Public input is due July 16, 2018.   All IEEE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11:00 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.  The next teleconference of the E&H committee is scheduled for June 9th.  Anyone is welcomed to join either of the two teleconferences hosted bi-weekly during the business day of Europe (15:00 – 15:30) and the Americas (3:00 – 3:30 PM EDT) with the login information on the IEEE E&H website:  http://sites.ieee.org/icps-ehe/

Issue: [16-67]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Robert G. Arno, Lorne Clark, Nehad El-Sharif, Jim Harvey, Kane Howard, Joe Weber, Guiseppe Parise, Jim Murphy

Category: Electrical, Energy Conservation & Management, Occupational Safety

Walla Walla University

*The NFPA is an organization with fire safety as a primary consideration.  The IEEE is an organization with the safety and sustainability of electrotechnology as a primary consideration.  These are two different complementary but oftentimes competing cultures with respect to sustaining the business model of an accredited consensus standards developer.

Michigan Electrical Administrative Act | §338.883

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

We follow state adaptations of the NFPA and IEEE family of consensus documents that set the standard of care for electrical safety in education facility design, construction, operation and maintenance; starting with the State of Michigan (a state with a $490 billion gross domestic product; and ranked the 13th largest state in the United States from an economic point of view).   The education facility construction industry is a significant part of that $490 billion of economic activity.

We have been advocating for changes to the State of Michigan Electrical Administrative Act that currently requires all electrical work valued above $100 to be installed by a licensed journeyman electrician and inspected by an accredited electrical inspector.    The $100 threshold was set decades ago and has never been challenged by another other advocacy enterprise representing the user interest.  Almost all of the stakeholders on the present Electrical Administrative Board are stakeholders who benefit economically from the $100 threshold.    Much of the reason for the apparent imbalance of interests lies in tradition; but also because no user interest has been present to advocate for a change.   As we explain in our ABOUT; the user-interest is the only interest advocating for cost-savings.  All the other stakeholders in the US standards system are generating revenue from their participation in the US standards system.  Making money is easier to understand than saving money.

This advocacy priority was on the Do-List of the original University of Michigan codes and standards advocacy enterprise which was focused on strengthening the voice of the user/owner/final fiduciary in the promulgation of regulations affecting Michigan educational facilities.   Of all the trades covered in the parent legislation — Stille-Derossett-Hale Single State Construction Code Act (Act 230 of 1972) — the electrical power discipline is the only discipline in Michigan building technology regulations that sets a dollar criteria for electrical work to be performed and inspected.   While we recognize the need for safe installation of the electrical power chain within a building; we propose another criteria for establishing the requirement for a licensed electrician and a licensed inspector should be determined (as it is in all other construction disciplines administered by the Bureau of Construction Codes, a division of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs).

The actual text of the present regulation is available by clicking here:   338.881 Definitions | Electrical Administrative Act 217 of 1956

As a consequence of the Governor’s Office of Regulatory Reinvention significant changes to both the Bureau of Construction Codes, a division of the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs) have taken place within the past twelve months; which make us optimistic about political support for our proposals.   We will be collaborating with our colleagues at Michigan State University to make necessary legislative changes we believe will lower the #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities in the State of Michigan.

We will refer the Michigan Electric Code, and other state electrical codes the IEEE Education and Healthcare Facilities Committee will host breakout teleconferences with electrical professionals in the education facilities industry as required by the demand for them.

The next meeting of the Michigan Electrical Board is August 16th.   We have been attending the meetings in Lansing and have made our proposal to revisit the dollar criteria known to the entire board.  Our approach is informal now — during the public hearing section of the meeting.   We hope the Electrical Administrative Board will develop another criteria on its own.

Issue: [14-1]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben, Kane Howard

Category: Electrical, State & Local Legislation


 

 

Energy Standard for Buildings

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Blue Ridge Community College

ASHRAE is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (what we call a regulatory product development “stream”).  It has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.

Addenda ai

This is a summary of incorporated changes from the first public review of addendum ai regarding field assembly of materials, and proper functioning of HVAC, service hot water, power, and lighting controls.

Addenda an

This addendum provides a new table of information about the new efficiency requirements from the US Department of Energy. It also provides new definitions that are needed to accompany the table. This addendum will have an energy savings impact in those buildings that use clean water pumps.

Addendum as

A proposed appendix to be included in Standard 90.1 as informative resources to aid in the understanding and adoption of the commissioning and testing by code officials, building owners, designers, commissioning providers, and others

Comments due August 13th. 

There is another batch of addenda — nine of them — that were released on August 3rd.   We will be sorting through them over the next few days but you can see them all now at the link below.

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

Comments are due September 2nd.

Keep in mind that technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 release public review documents in 30-to-90 day intervals and also meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Atlanta, Georgia January 14-16 2019.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference to attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We will also host a dedicated markup session for mechanical engineering standards on August 30th, 11 AM Eastern time during which time we will examine and markup documents released for public review by ASHRAE, ASME, AWWA, IAMPO and other organizations developing documents for incorporation by reference into public safety laws and energy conservation legislation.


Posted July 20, 2018

North Dakota State University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.

Addendum ao

A fan efficiency metric, called Fan Energy Index (FEI), was developed by manufacturer trade associations working collaboratively with efficiency advocates and DOE. FEI is defined in the calculation standard.  FEI is a ratio of electrical input powers that accounts for the electrical and mechanical losses upstream of the impeller shaft compared to a reference fan. The reference fan’s electrical input power is the numerator of the ratio, and the subject fan’s electrical input power is the denominator. The lower the subject fan’s electrical input power, the higher the FEI rating. FEI is a wire-to-air metric that considers losses of motors, variable speed drives, belts, etc., and FEI differentiates selections based on fan static pressure from selections based on fan total pressure.

Addendum ap

HVAC systems with simultaneous heating and cooling require supply air temperature (SAT) reset except in climate zones 0A through 3A. In these climate zones, several system types can successfully dehumidify the outside air while still providing SAT reset and reducing reheat energy use. Supply temperature reset saves significant heating energy in VAV reheat systems in high outside air systems, and that savings is higher in climate zone 3A than 2A, 1A and 0A. Separately dehumidifying the outside air reduces the total volume of air that must be cooled, significantly reducing cooling energy use in all the warm and humid climate zones

Addendum aq

Significant changes to Chapter 9 – Lighting Control

Addendum m

Table G3.1 Modeling Requirements for Calculating Proposed and Baseline Building Performance

Addendum z

Calculation of Design Energy Cost and Energy Cost Budget

Comments due July 29th.  There is another batch of addenda that span across several sections of content which we may cover in a future post.   Those addenda are due August 13th.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

ASHRAE is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (what we call a regulatory product development “stream”).  Technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 release public review documents in 30-to-90 day intervals and also meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Atlanta, Georgia January 14-16 2019.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference to attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We will also host a dedicated markup session for mechanical engineering standards on July 24th, 11:00 AM during which time we will examine and markup documents released for public review by ASHRAE, ASME, AWWA, IAMPO and other organizations developing documents for incorporation by reference into public safety law.

 

Issue: [Various]

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to ANSI Standards Action Public Review | PDF Pages 30-55


Posted April 24, 2018

 

University of Houston

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  Two addenda have been released following the ASHRAE Winter 2018 Conference a few weeks ago.   The topical considerations of the redlines are summarized below:

Addendum ak: Revisions to Tables in Appendix G regarding solar heat gain coefficients in assembly spaces according to climatic zone.

Addendum bg:   A Simplified Building Method intended to provide a simple approach for contractors and designers who design or renovate office, school and retail buildings up to 25,000 ft2

Comments are due April 23rd.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

Technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 typically meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Houston Texas, June 23 through 27.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference at least attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.

 


March 26, 2018

Harvard University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  Two batches of addenda have been released following the ASHRAE Winter 2018 Conference a few weeks ago.   The topical considerations of the redlines are summarized below:

Addendum ac: Definitions

Addendum ad: Compliance paths

Addendum ai: Commissioning and functional testing cost 

Addendum q: Reorganization of Section 5  

Comments are due March 26th.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

The ASHRAE suite of standards is a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.

 


September 20, 2017

The New School | Manhattan

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

Addendum AA

The purpose of this addenda is to resolve possible confusion on the applicability of controls to the listed lighting equipment and applications in the exceptions to 9.2.2.3 (Interior Lighting Power Densities) and to ensure that the control requirements called out in the lighting power densities exceptions list are specifically spelled out in the controls section. This will improve compliance and prevent users from missing a control requirement.

Addendum G

Summary of independent substantive changes:

• An editorial change is made in the definition of “occupied-standby mode” to avoid confusion with the definition of population.

• Occupied Standby Controls is moved from the mandatory section to the prescriptive section so anyone who does not want to implement occupied standby controls can use the performance compliance approach.

• Clarification was added that the procedure only applies when using Standard 62.1’s Ventilation Rate Procedure since the reference to spaces that can be unventilated in standby mode is in the Standard 62.1 VRP Table. If natural ventilation alone is used or the IAQ Procedure is used to calculate ventilation rates, this section does not apply.

Addendum V

Most hospitals use reheat HVAC systems with simultaneous heating and cooling. Even with required air or water economizers, there are many hours with simultaneous heating and cooling use. It is generally lower cost and consumes less site and source energy to generate heating water and chilled water with a heat recovery chiller (aka heat pump chiller) than it is to use separate boilers that comply with 90.1. Evaluation of a typical hospital in multiple climate zones shows a potential for reasonable recovery with a heat recovery chiller that is sized between 7% and 12% of the cooling plant peak load, depending on climate zone. For simplification, the minimum is set at 7% of total cooling load across the board in this proposal. An economic analysis was made using the 90.1 scalar method based on installed heat recovery chiller costs of $1,800 per ton. The resulting scalars were all under 10 years for required climate zones vs. a scalar limit of 13 years. The trend of higher savings in warmer climate zones was used to include climate zones 1 and 0 without specific analysis. The payback in Climate Zone 2B was under 5 years.

Addendum W

Significant energy and water savings could accrue nationwide if these revised flowrates for showerheads and faucets are adopted. At the levels in the addendum, all fixtures except kitchen faucets match the WaterSense specifications, so they are readily identifiable and available in the market place. The proposal provides the following reductions in maximum flow when compared to the Uniform Plumbing Code and International Plumbing Code that both have the same flow limits

Addendum Y

The rules in Appendix G are ambiguous with regards to how sizing runs are performed. The current edition allows the use of either annual historic weather files or 99.6% design day heating and 1% dry bulb and wet-bulb cooling design temperatures. It is also silent on what diversity schedules to use for internal gains. Leaving these choices up to the user means that the stringency of the baseline can vary significantly which should be avoided. This proposal fixes those parameters so that they are modeled using the same approach by all modeling teams. The proposal clarifies that plant sizing is based on coincident loads

Comments are due October 1st.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 90.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).

We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

 


August 14, 2017

Arkansas State University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

Addendum M

When Addendum bm to Standard 90.1-2013 was developed it set baseline requirements in Appendix G approximately equal to the stringency of the 2004 Standard. Rules for modelling infiltration were developed in parallel to Addendum bm and included proposed building infiltration at 0.4 cfm/ft2 of the building envelope at a fixed building pressure differential of 0.3 in. of water. However the strategy of setting baseline requirements at the 2004 level was omitted and baseline infiltration was set same as the proposed building. This proposed change addresses that oversight by adding a requirement that the baseline include infiltration at 0.8 cfm/ft2 greater than that assumed for a building compliant with the 2013 Standard. This addendum impacts an optional performance path in the standard designed to provide increased flexibility and therefore was not subjected to cost effectiveness analysis

Indiana Wesleyan University

Addendum N

This addendum deletes (or modifies the terminology of) obsolete definitions that are no longer in use or necessary in ASHRAE 90.1. This addendum does not affect the energy use of the standard and has no economic impact.

Addendum S

The following change is required in order to capture the 5% limit on renewable energy proposed for Appendix G compliance. Using this formula allows the PCI to always reflect the actual building design without any adjustment for renewable energy contribution. Instead the PCI is adjusted such that it reflects the limit on renewable energy.  This addendum also clarifies for both Section 11 and Appendix G which renewable systems are eligible. This addendum impacts an optional performance path in the standard designed to provide increased flexibility and therefore was not subjected to cost effectiveness analysis.

University of Texas Antonio

Addendum T

This proposed addendum expands the exterior LPD application table to cover additional exterior spaces that are not currently in the exterior LPD table. The expansion references appropriate space types found in the interior LPD table with appropriate modifications of the value that recognizes the lower need for lighting power and illumination in exterior applications.  This addendum will advance energy savings by providing an appropriate LPD value for exterior applications where one did not exist before which potentially allows for either exemption or the use of a higher than appropriate value. This addendum has no cost increase because it only applies existing requirements to additional spaces and applications

Addendum U

This proposed addendum applies existing parking lot and other exterior lighting requirements (where applicable) to exterior lighting that is associated with and tied to a building as it is powered from electrical service on the building site.  This addendum will advance energy savings by providing appropriate LPD limits primarily to parking lots that are constructed and/or renovated as part of a building site to support the building in the same manner as current requirements in 90.1.   This addendum has no cost increase because it only applies existing requirements to additional spaces and applications

University of Utah Hospital

Comments are due August 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 90.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

 

 

IBC 2021 | Electrical Room Design

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The location, size and operating characteristics of electrical service equipment is one of the first challenges that architects and engineers must resolve when a facility is designed — particularly in renovation projects in which legacy safety features must be “brought up to code”.    Design considerations must accommodate requirements for appropriate operation and maintenance.  Very often the consensus documents that govern architectural requirements — most frequently the International Building Code (IBC) and the National Electrical Code (NEC) — are not incorporated by reference into state and local public safety with the current version.   The IBC and the NEC are developed one-year out of step with one another (nominally) but state level adoptions may widen the out-of-step condition.

While it may be desirable for all consensus documents that govern building safety and sustainability to be revised in a coordinated fashion, the practical reality is that historical, cultural and technological differences restrain coordinated building code development.   Getting building safety and sustainability codes to harmonize more closely — and in step with one another — should be a national priority by federal agencies charged with oversight in the construction of buildings and infrastructure.  At the moment, there is no business model in government or in the private sector that supports close harmonization.

The IEEE Standards Association established Standards Coordinating Committee 18 (SCC-18) for liaison between the National Electrical Code Committees and other IEEE Committees (such as the committee that develops the National Electrical Safety Code).  There is no liaison between the IEEE and the International Code Council on electrical safety issues; however.   Optimal harmonization depends upon subject matter experts familiar with the action in both safety “universes”.  For the education facilities industry at least (the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States) liaison is conducted by the  IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times monthly.   The E&H Committee meets twice today, for example.  (Click here)

In our April 11th post on this topic we identified electrical safety issues on the agenda of the IBC Group A technical committee:

2021 IBC Proposals for Electrical Rooms

In play are considerations for the size and orientation of the electrical room (assuming an interior substation); access to the room, how the room — inherently a high-risk space — is illuminated and cooled.  The proposed changes are largely correlation changes but carry the risk all-too-common in consensus document development that by being too specific correlation risk between the design disciplines will increase and/or make the requirements more difficult to enforce.

We now have the results of the Committee Action Hearings:

2018 Report of the Committee Action Hearings on the 2018 Editions of the Group A International Codes

The responses to proposals regarding coordination with architectural disciplines are noteworthy and require a careful reading.   Also noteworthy is the relatively narrow time frame for public participation in the development of the core electrical safety documents in the United States:

ICC 2021 International Building Code:  Public commenting  is due July 16th

IEEE 2022 National Electrical Safety Code: Public input is due July 16th

NFPA 2020 National Electrical Code: Public commenting is due August 30th

We have six weeks this summer to coordinate accepted good practice for electrical system design, construction and maintenance that will be available for incorporation by reference into public law at the state level.

All ICC, IEEE and NFPA documents are standing items on our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which is accessible to everyone with login information below:

Contact

Issue: [17-234]

 

Sustainability Criteria for Professional Services

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

“In the Sierras. /Lake Tahoe” | Albert Bierstadt, 1868 | Harvard University Art Museum

NSF International has released for public review a proposal for a new American national standard titled NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services.  From the project prospectus:

The Standard is one of the first to focus on the service industry subsectors described as “professional services”. Professional service firms are often characterized as those that have low capital intensity, high knowledge intensity, and a professionalized workforce. This Standard is applicable to the professional service subsectors identified in GSA’s Professional Services Schedule (“PSS”). These services include: Financial and Business Solutions; Advertising and Integrated Marketing Services; Language Services; Professional Engineering Services; Mission-Oriented Business Integrated Services; Worldwide Logistics Services; Environmental Services; and Consolidated Services.

Because the education industry has thousands — if not tens of thousands — of sustainability workgroups that manage sustainability projects; this proposed standard is noteworthy.  More complete information is available in NSF Public Groups Area linked below:

NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services

Comments are due August 13th.  CLICK HERE for a public review copy.   Send your comments to Kianda Franklin, (734) 827-3813, kfranklin@nsf.org with with copy to (psa@ansi.org).

All NSF standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to join them by CLICKING HERE.

Issue: [18-187]

Category: Administration & Management, Facility Asset Management, Public Safety, Risk Management

Contact: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben, Jack Janveja

 


LEARN MORE HERE:

ANSI Standards Action Announcement | PDF Page 7

Introducing NSF 391.1: A Sustainability Standard for Professional Services Providers

Installation Practices for ICT Cabling

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

North Dakota State University

Information and communications technology (ICT) is a fast-moving economic space in which a mix of consensus and open-source standards form the broad contours of leading practice.   ICT standards tend to follow international developments — more so than, say, fire safety standards which are more familiar to education facility leadership.  All school districts, colleges, universities and university-affiliated health care systems have significant product, system, firmware and labor resources allocated toward ICT.   Risk management departments are attentive to cybersecurity issues.   All school districts, colleges, universities and university-affiliated health care systems have significant product, system, firmware and labor resources allocated toward ICT.

The Building Industry Consulting Service International (BICSI) is a professional association supporting the advancement of the ICT community.   This community is roughly divided between experts who deal with “outside-plant” systems and “building premise” systems on either side of the ICT demarcation point.   BICSI standards cover the wired and wireless spectrum of voice, data, electronic safety & security, project management and audio & video technologies.  Its work is divided among several committees:

BICSI Standards Program Technical Subcommittees

BICSI International Standards Program

BICSI has released for public review a new consensus document that supports education industry ICT enterprises:  BICSI N1 – Installation Practices for Telecommunications and ICT Cabling and Related Cabling Infrastructure.    You may obtain a free electronic copy from: standards@bicsi.org; Jeff Silveira, (813) 903-4712, jsilveira@bicsi.org.

Comments are due August 20th.

You may send comments directly to Jeff (with copy to psa@ansi.org).   Additionally, BICSI technical committees meet face-to-face twice a year.  The next meeting will be held during the BICSI Fall Conference in San Antonio, Texas, September 9-13 (CLICK HERE for registration information).  We encourage ICT subject matter experts in the San Antonio region to participate. 

This commenting opportunity will be referred to IEEE SCC-18 and the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets 4 times monthly in American and European time zones.  CLICK HERE for login information.

Issue: [18-191]

Category: Telecommunications, Electrical, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey

ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 7


Adhiyamaan College of Engineering

Standard for Healthcare Administration

August 16, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) is the United States Technical Advisory Group Administrator for the first global standard for health care administration; developed by International Organization for Standardization Technical Committee 304 (Click here: ISO/TC 304).     The creation of this standard was initiated by UTMB and, if this document is incorporated by reference into public law, or adopted by the private sector as a performance benchmark,  it will have significant effect upon health care enterprises in every industry in the US — not the least among them the healthcare delivery enterprises in the US education industry.   

The core committee met July 13th at  NSF International Headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan.   A summary of the activity at that meeting will be posted here soon.   In the intervening time, for information about participating contact Lee Webster (lswebste@utmb.edu).

ISO TC 304 Participation Map | Click on image for more details


March 28, 2018

We have received an update from S. Lee Webster, the global Secretariat for this emergent document:

Briefing Paper about Healthcare Organization Management Standards (030518) v1 (1)

The next meeting of the various working groups will be held in Vilnius, Lithuania, May 21-25, 2018.  Contact Lee Webster for information about how to attend (lswebste@utmb.edu).  Ahead of the May meetings, we will be scheduling a live Q&A with Lee during one of our weekly Open Door teleconferences.

Vilnius University Hospital Santaros Klinikos (Click on image)


February 27, 2018

 

Quoting S. Joe Bhatia, CEO of the American National Standards Institute in a May 16, 2015 press release:

“With more than $360 billion spent annually on health care administration in the U.S., reducing costs and streamlining administrative processes in health care is a critical national priority,” said S. Joe Bhatia, president and chief executive officer of ANSI, the U.S. member body to ISO. “The newly formed ISO TC 304 shows great promise in tackling inefficiencies in health care administration worldwide, and ANSI proudly supports UTMB’s leadership role as acting secretariat on behalf of the United States.”

It is rare for a US educational institution to assume leadership at this scale. As an Accredited Standards Developer the UTMB will oversee the creation of standards and technical reports that define effective, interoperable, and comparable healthcare administration practices and metrics among healthcare entities. These practices and metrics will be limited to staff and operational management of healthcare facilities.  Excerpts from the standardization project identify the rationale:  

Rationale 1: Establishing healthcare administrative standards will reduce the cost of providing healthcare through the widespread adoption of interoperable metrics and practices.

Rationale 2: Reducing the cost of healthcare will make these services more affordable and thereby provide an opportunity for greater access to society.

Rationale 3: Improving the administrative and managerial performance of healthcare entities results in better healthcare outcomes for patients.

Rationale 4: Although numerous standards exist for the laboratory protocols, clinical services and patient care functions of healthcare organizations, there are scant standards that address administrative functions or these standards are specific to a particular healthcare entity.

Rationale 5: Standardizing Healthcare administrative metrics will create apple-to-apple comparisons of organizations performance that will better educate consumers and drive process improvement activities

Rationale 6: Rural and underserved communities will have access to effective practices that offer a roadmap to improve their own quality of healthcare services they receive.

Rationale 7: Positive support have been received from other ASD and members of the healthcare technical community

Rationale 8: Standards will complement standards developing efforts of existing ANSI and ISO standards developing committees.

Rationale 9: The healthcare community and its stakeholders are highly receptive to standardization and certification and will adopt approaches from these sources readily. 

Those practices and metrics that directly affect patient care and medical research are outside the scope of this standards effort. Clinical performance and patient safety and satisfaction standards will not be pursued by this ASD body.  ISO 304 will also not address 1) the management or administration of organizations that practice dentistry, 2) the production and use of medical devices or instruments, and 3) the capture and analysis of clinical medical information or procedures.   More detailed information is available in the documents linked below:

14-99 Proposal_for_a_NFTA (Healthcare Administration 0915)v3

14-99 Summary of the Proposal for ISO TC for Healthcare Admin Stds (101915) v1

University of Texas Medical Branch

The slide deck for the December 15, 2016 teleconference is linked below:

Healthcare Administration Information (121516) v1 (Webster) 14-99

Facility managers in university-affiliated medical research and healthcare delivery enterprises who would like to participate in developing the US position are encouraged to contact Lee Webster Lee Webster (lswebste@utmb.edu).

[Issue 14-99]

Contact:  Lee Webster (lswebste@utmb.edu), Mike Anthony (mike@standardsmichigan.com), Richard Robben (rrobben1952@gmail.com), James Harvey (jharvey@umich.edu), Christine Fischer (chrisfis@umich.edu)

Category: Medical Research & Health Care, Management, Finance & Administration, International


From our archives:

 

Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

August 15, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Western Wyoming Community College

The ASHRAE committee writing standards for ventilation and indoor air quality has released another batch of redlines for public review.  These changes are important because they are referenced into ASHRAE 90.1 — Energy Standard for Buildings — and ASHRAE 90.1 is referenced into the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).  The IECC is incorporated by reference into federal and state energy laws.

Addendum aa. The indoor air quality procedure has a long history going back to the 1981 standard. Weaknesses in the requirements for identifying the contaminants
of concern, identifying concentration limits and exposure periods, and specifying the percentage of building occupants to be satisfied with perceived IAQ. Although the percentage of building occupants to be satisfied with perceived IAQ may be specified, and the standard requires that it be measured; this measurement usually would take place after occupancy so is often ignored or omitted. This proposed addendum adds requirements for designing to specific targets. The target design compounds and mixtures are specifically identified.

Addendum ab. Indoor CO2 has had a prominent place in discussions of ventilation and IAQ for many years. The relevant issues include the impacts of CO2 on building occupants, the use of CO2 to control outdoor air ventilation rates, CO2 monitoring as an indicator of general IAQ conditions and the use of indoor CO2 to estimate building ventilation rates. This proposed addendum adds a new Normative Appendix D, Estimation of Steady-State Indoor CO2 Concentrations Based on Per Person Ventilation Rates and Occupant Characteristics. The purpose is to describe the estimation of steady-state indoor carbon dioxide concentrations for a given per-person outdoor air ventilation rate.

Addendum ac.  Informative Appendix C (Summary of Selected Air Quality Guidelines) in 62.1-2016 was deleted in a previous addendum. This proposed addendum
adds a new Informative Appendix C with content supportive of changes to the Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP).

Comments are due August 27th.

All ASHRAE redlines are accessible on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review.   We encourage our colleagues to comment.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Agenda teleconference.  CLICK HERE to log in.   Additionally, we host an monthly online teleconference for building industry professionals in the mechanical engineering discipline that are active in the education facility market.  It should be obvious that we have mastered the stream of technical standards that determine #TotalCostofOwnership in education facilities.  The next teleconference is on August 30th, 11 AM Eastern time.

Mechanical Engineering Codes and Standards

Feel free to log in.

We also encourage students, faculty and facility management professionals to attend ASHRAE technical committee meetings at its next Winter Conference, January 12-16, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (LEARN MORE)

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


Posted May 24, 2018

Beloit College

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — which specifies minimum ventilation rates and other measures for new and existing buildings that are intended to provide indoor air quality that is acceptable to human occupants and that minimizes adverse health effects.  Recently released Addendum i contains significant changes to the scope of this document which are now open for public review and can be accessed  on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)

Comments are due May 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 and any other of its consensus documents.   The ASHRAE suite is a swiftly moving suite which effectively sets the standard of care for environmental air systems in education and healthcare facilities.  Many of its committees meet twice a year at various locations around the US; the next Annual conference to be hosted in Houston, June 23-27.   We encourage workpoint subject matter experts in the Houston area — i.e. design, construction and O&M tradespersons working in education and healthcare campus HVAC shops — to attend this conference and sit in on the meetings of ASHRAE 62.1 (or any other technical committee) to observe how leading practice is discovered.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


April 21, 2018

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  These can be found on Pages 36 through 83 of ANSI Standards Action or at ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)   The changes are non-trivial; a sample of three of them summarized below:

Addendum g: HVAC requirements for minimally occupied spaces

Addendum h:  The standard may be applied to both new and existing buildings but its provisions are not primarily intended to be applied retroactively when the standard is used as a mandatory regulation or code.

Addendum z: Tabulation of requisite ventilation required at the outdoor air intake for many systems.

There are 15 more changes in the batch most recently released.  These specifics will find their way into construction documents and commissioning agreements and operations and maintenance budgets.

Comments are due April 22nd.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to our ASHRAE 62.1 Workspace

 


September 5, 2017

University of Michigan Ross School of Business

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1b-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum responds to increasing requests for more simplified table for ventilation rate procedure of the standard. It contains a simplified ventilation rate table in Informative Appendix D for use in existing buildings where information for calculating minimum ventilation using Normative Appendix A for multiple spaces is often unavailable.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1d-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum deletes Informative Appendix D (Rationale for Minimum Physiological Requirements for Respiration Air Based on CO2 Concentration). Appendix D first appeared in 62-1989. Its purpose was to explain the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide in spaces. It is based on data from the 1950’s. Newer information is available. The committee is aware of misuse and confusion caused by the information in its present form and prefers to delete this misused appendix now. The committee may add back relevant informative guidance that assists with implementation of the standard in the next version of the standard.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1f-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) The so-called “Multiple Spaces Equation” is very difficult to use, especially for variable volume systems for which there are an infinite number of scenarios with varying airflow, occupancy, supply air temperature, etc., all of which affect system ventilation efficiency. 62.1 includes two options for calculating system ventilation efficiency, a prescriptive approach using Table 6.2.5.2 and a more fundamental approach in Normative Appendix A. This proposed addendum replaces the table approach with two formulas, one used to determine system ventilation efficiency (Ev) and one used to determine minimum primary airflow setpoint intended to be used for VAV systems.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2i-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would make explicit that placing a new fan in a kitchen or bathroom in an existing dwelling unit can address the airflow deficit that would otherwise have existed through Section A3. This has been assumed to be true, but has not previously been made explicit. This proposed change would make this condition more transparent to users.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2j-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would explicitly allow existing buildings to use a branch-circuit overcurrent device as an override even if it is not dedicated to only the ventilation fan in recognition that running a new circuit for the fan in an existing home is not always feasible.

Comments are due October 8th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

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