6.2 | Standards Michigan

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Power, Information & Communications Technology

“Tesla: God of Lightning” / CLICK ON IMAGE FOR VIMEO CLIP

We collaborate closely with the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee; a subcommittee of the Industrial Applications Society which provides a platform for leading practice discovery among electrical engineers who are responsible for electrotechnologies in school districts, colleges, universities and university-affiliated healthcare systems.   In many cases, with research university power systems with upwards of 100 megawatts of base load supplying campuses and academic medical centers, many campus power systems are larger than investor owned, municipal or cooperatively-owned electrical utilities.   Accordingly, in recent years, many large educational organizations are selling their power systems to private industry to own and operate.

Many educational institutions also own and operate their own telecommunications system and have significant data management systems.

IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee 

The committee, founded in 2013, features open discussion, experience exchange, and solution consideration among thought leaders globally, every other week, in both European and American time zones.  It collaborates closely with the IEEE Standards Association and the NFPA Electrical Division through IEEE SCC-18.   

6.19.20

All teleconferences are upon to the public and can be accessed clicking here: IEEE E&H Committee Teleconference Login

The committee meets every other Tuesday — 15:00 Central European time and 3:00 PM Eastern time in the Americas.  We host our own Power & ICT teleconferences on the same day but will likely change this arrangement later in 2020.  Remote attendance is possible with the login credentials on the draft agendas.

You are invited to join the LinkedIn Group at this link: LinkedIn Education & Healthcare Facilities Electrotechnology Committee

@IEEECampus

 


From the emergent gallery of campus power system presentations by IEEE-TV:

Overview of UC Berkeley Resistance Grounded Campus Power System

Overview of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Power System

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post-Quantum Cryptographic Algorithms

CLICK ON IMAGE

Comments due June 30th.

CLICK HERE for information about how to submit comments.   We maintain NIST activity on the standing agenda of our Federal Action teleconferences.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

Internet of Small Things

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Healthcare Facilities Code

“The Doctor” | Sir Luke Fildes (1891)

The NFPA 99 Healthcare Facilities Code committee develops a distinct consensus document (i.e. “regulatory product”) that is distinct from National Electrical Code Article 517; though there are overlaps and gaps that are the natural consequence of changing technology and regulations.  It is worthwhile reviewing the scope of each committee:

NFPA 99 Scope: This Committee shall have primary responsibility for documents that contain criteria for safeguarding patients and health care personnel in the delivery of health care services within health care facilities: a) from fire, explosion, electrical, and related hazards resulting either from the use of anesthetic agents, medical gas equipment, electrical apparatus, and high frequency electricity, or from internal or external incidents that disrupt normal patient care; b) from fire and explosion hazards; c) in connection with the use of hyperbaric and hypobaric facilities for medical purposes; d) through performance, maintenance and testing criteria for electrical systems, both normal and essential; and e) through performance, maintenance and testing, and installation criteria: (1) for vacuum systems for medical or surgical purposes, and (2) for medical gas systems; and f) through performance, maintenance and testing of plumbing, heating, cooling , and ventilating in health care facilities.

NFPA 70 Article 517 Scope:  The provisions of this article shall apply to electrical construction and installation criteria in healthcare facilities that provide services to human beings.  The requirements in Parts II and III not only apply to single-function buildings but are also intended to be individually applied to their respective forms of occupancy within a multi-function building (e.g. a doctor’s examining room located within a limited care facility would be required to meet the provisions of 517.10)   Informational Note: For information concerning performance, maintenance, and testing criteria, refer to the appropriate health care facilities documents.

In short, NFPA 70 Article 517 is intended to focus only on electrical safety issues though electrotechnology complexity and integration in healthcare settings (security, telecommunications, wireless medical devices, fire safety, environmental air control, etc.) usually results in conceptual overlap with other regulatory products such as NFPA 101 (Life Safety Code) and the International Building Code.

Several issues were recently debated by the Article 517 technical committee during the 2020 National Electrical Code Second Draft meetings

  • The conditions under which reconditioned electrical equipment be installed in healthcare settings; contingent on listing and re-certification specifics.
  • Relaxation of the design rules for feeder and branch circuit sizing through the application of demand factors.
  • Application of ground fault circuit interrupters.

There are, of course, many others, not the least of which involves emergency management.

We need to “touch” this code at least once a month because of its interdependence on other consensus products by other standards developing organizations.  To do this we refer NFPA 99 standards action to the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online four times monthly in European and American time zones.  We also collaborate with IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 18.   We maintain NFPA 99 on the standing agenda of both our Power & ICT and Healthcare Facilities teleconferences; open to everyone.  See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting.

Issues: [12-18, [15-97] and [16-101]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Robert Arno, Josh Elvove, Joe DeRosier, Larry Spielvogel

NFPA Staff Liaison: Jonathan Hart

Archive / NFPA 99


LEARN MORE:

4.7.2020

 

Wiring Fire Prevention in Hospitals

Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli / Rome, Italy

Localized fire ignition hazard in branch circuits, cords and connected equipment

Electrical Engineering Department, Sapienza Università di Roma
Italian National Fire Department

Abstract.  In electrical power systems, the fire ignition can be originated by incident energy of faults. Faults involve overheating, arcing and burning for all the wiring exposed to mechanical damage and other insulation stresses especially wiring connected by flexible cords and cables. The mechanical damage of the stranded bare conductors can degrade the effective sizing of the total cross section, causing anomalous conditions of local overcurrent. To highlight the local incident energy in case of fault, the parameters steady current and transient current densities can assist in analyzing the event. The conductors size reduction, degrading locally the thermal withstand capability, makes ineffective the protection coordination amplifying the anomalous effect of current no detectable adequately by overcurrent protective devices. The faulted cords remain so energized and present electric shock and fire hazards. Generally and especially in strategic buildings as hospitals, preventing ignition is better than promptly extinguishing. An efficient protection can be achieved by integration of active and passive techniques : by adoption of the special device Arc-fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) that recognize the arcing; by wiring the circuits, particularly extension cords, with Ground-Fault-Forced Cables, GFFCs, that convert faults into ground faults easily protected by ground fault protective devices (GFPDs).

Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli / Rome, Italy

4.21.2020

 

IEC/SC 8C: Network Management

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83B-202X, Standard for Safety for Switchboard and Switchgear Wires and Cables PINS

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Medium-Voltage AC Contactors, Controllers, and Control Centers / july 13

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NEMA Generic / July 13

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INCITS Batch Mode Comment Deadline: July 14, 2020

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