6.22 | Standards Michigan

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Building Construction & Safety Code

“Architect’s Dream” / Thomas Code

The scope of NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code — a consensus product of ‘similar’ scope developed by the International Code Council* — is paraphrased below:

 “…The Code addresses those construction, protection, and occupancy features necessary to minimize danger to life and property.  The Code does not address features that solely affect economic loss to private property…”

This product creates a fully dimensioned best practice bibliography for the built environment in education communities and others.  CLICK HERE for Free Access

The original University of Michigan standards advocacy enterprise began its participation in this code since its inaugural edition in 2009, with special attention to the chapters listed below:

Chapter 17: Educational Occupancies

Chapter 18: Daycare Occupancies

Chapter 19: Health Care Occupancies

Chapter 51: Energy Systems

Chapter 52: Electrical Systems

NFPA 5000 is deep into its 2021 revision; with the status of NITMAM’s filed with the NFPA Standards Council uncertain owing to COVID-19 contingencies.   Jim Pauley’s statement regarding cancellation all gathering, including the Standard’s Council’s NITMAM meeatings is linked below:

CANCELLATION OF THE 2020 NFPA CONFERENCE & EXPOSITION

We can, however, have a look at the ideas in play in the 2021 revision; some of which have been inspired by Standards Michigan:

Educational and Day-Care Occupancies

Health Care Occupancies

We maintain NFPA 5000 on the standing agenda of our Model Building Code teleconference, during which time we examine it along with competitor products; notably the International Building Code.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

Issue: [8-100]

Category: Architectural, Structural, Accessibility

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Joe DeRosier, Jack Janveja

*By comparison the scope statement in the International Building Code — Section 101 General — is paraphrased below:

“…The provisions of this code shall apply to the construction, alteration, relocation, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, maintenance, removal and demolition of every building or structure or appurtenances connected or attached to such buildings or structures…”

 

CFR Title 41: PART 102-76—DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

The Birth of a Building: Constructing the United States National Museum

The construction industry is one of the largest employers in any community and, as such, a significant generator of employment.  The so-called “multiplier effect” cited by economists means that when you add one person working in the construction industry you create two additional jobs in other sectors.

The construction industry is also one of the most heavily regulated; heavy regulation being a characteristic of many solid, but slow-growth economic sectors.

As public assets, education facilities are much like federal facilities — both expected to have a long life-cycles — reflected in the guidance in the in the link below.   In privately developed best practice literature authored by ANSI-accredited standards developers you will find federal regulations heavily referenced; but not the other way around.

Code of Federal Regulations Title 41: PART 102-76—DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

We track action in federal design and construction regulations because federal regulatory bodies are relatively well staffed.  Some within those groups may say otherwise but that is another discussion.  Federal regulators know know what other federal agencies are doing — such as the Occupational Safety & Health Administration and the Department of Energy  — and they seem to keep pace with private, non-profit standards developers.  Also: many colleges and universities enjoy the “halo effect” of having a National Laboratory or a Presidential Library * present within or near the footprint of their campus.  With the  halo comes the obligation to maintain separate staffing of finance and facility management professionals.

By statue (National Technology Transfer & Advancement Act) federal agencies defer to private standards setting organizations.   The limit of our attention in this section of the Code of Federal Regulations ends here.

We maintain federal construction standards on the standing agenda of our Model Building Code and Federal teleconferences.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.


*  The University of Michigan, Harvard University, the University of Arkansas, and three other Texas universities — University of Texas at Austin,  Texas A&M and Southern Methodist University — are locations of presidential libraries governed by the provisions of this section of the Code of Federal Regulations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.18

Whole Building Design Guide

“The Ideal City” (c. 1480) / Fra Carnevale

The National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization bringing together representatives of government, the professions, industry, labor and consumer interests to focus on the identification and resolution of problems and potential problems that hamper the construction of safe, affordable structures for housing, commerce and industry throughout the United States.  The National Institute of Building Sciences was authorized by the U.S. Congress in the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, Public Law 93-383.

As the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States — and one that is largely financed with public money —  the education industry is a major stakeholder in NIBS leading practice discovery and promulgation.  Best practice in education facility construction is informed by best practices in other federal agencies with significant construction spend

We track development and commenting opportunities on NIBS consensus products linked below:

Whole Building Design Guide

National BIM Standard V3

United States National CAD Standard

It is remarkable how much standards action happens in the drearier (boilerplate) — General Conditions — part of a construction contract.  Admittedly, you must have an interest in the fine points of the building construction disciplines.

As of today’s posting we do not find any NIBS consensus products open for public comment or in the Federal Register.  We do, however, keep NIBS products on our monthly Design & Contract teleconferences; open to everyone.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

Issue: [15-317]

Category: Architectural, Management & Finance

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben

Representative School, College & University Construction Contract General Conditions


LEARN MORE:

2018 NIBS Report to the President of the United States

 

H.R. 865 / Rebuild America’s Schools Act of 2019

Photo by Architect of the Capitol | Left: The teacher and children in a “little red schoolhouse” represent an important part of American education in the 1800s.
Right: Students attend a land grant college, symbolic of the national commitment to higher learning.

 

Higher Education Estates Management Report 2019

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Building Code of Canada

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r Solar Thermal Collector / august 3rd

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Day Care

“Kindergarten” c. 1885 / Johann Sperl

Safety and sustainability for any facility begins with an understanding of who shall occupy the built environment and how.  University settings, with mixed-use phenomenon arising spontaneously and temporarily, often present challenges.   Educational communities are a convergent settings for families; day care facilities among them.  First principles regarding occupancy classifications for day care facilities appear in Section 308 of the International Building Code, Institutional Group I; linked below:

2018 International Building Code Section 308 Institutional Group I-4

The ICC Institutional Group I-4 classification includes buildings and structures occupied by more than five persons of any age who received custodial care for fewer than 24 hours per day by persons other than parents or guardian, relatives by blood, marriage or adoption, and in a place other than the home of the person cared far.  This group includes both adult and child day care.

We maintain focus on child day care.  Many educational communities operate child day care enterprises for both academic study and/or as auxiliary (university employee benefit) enterprises.

Princeton University Child Care Center

Each of the International Code Council code development groups fetch back to a shared understanding of the nature of the facility; character of its occupants and prospective usage patterns.

The Group B developmental cycle ended in December 2019.  The 2021 revision of the International Building code is in production now, though likely slowed down because of the pandemic.   Ahead of the formal, market release of the Group B products, you can sample the safety concepts in play during this revision with an examination of the documents linked below:

2019 GROUP B PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE I-CODES ALBUQUERQUE COMMITTEE ACTION HEARINGS

2019 REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ACTION HEARINGS ON THE 2018 EDITIONS OF THE GROUP B INTERNATIONAL CODES

Search on the terms “day care” and “daycare” to get a sample of the prevailing concepts; use of such facilities as storm shelters, for example.

“The Country School” | Winslow Homer

We encourage our safety and sustainability colleagues to participate directly in the ICC Code Development process.   We slice horizontally through the disciplinary silos (“incumbent verticals”) created by hundreds of consensus product developers every week and we can say, upon considerable authority that the ICC consensus product development environment is one of the best in the world.  Privately developed standards (for use by public agencies) is a far better way to discover and promulgate leading practice than originating technical specifics from legislative bodies.   CLICK HERE to get started.  Contact Kimberly Paarlberg (kpaarlberg@iccsafe.org) for more information.

There are competitor consensus products in this space — Chapter 18 Day-Care Occupancies in NFPA 5000 Building Construction and Safety Code, for example; a title we maintain the standing agenda of our Model Building Code teleconferences.   It is developed from a different pool of expertise under a different due process regime.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

 

Issue: [18-166]

Category: Architectural, Healthcare Facilities, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Richard Robben


LEARN MORE:

cdpACCESS Hearing Video Streaming Service

5.10.20

Sustainability in buildings and civil engineering work

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Remote Inspections / PINS

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