Elevator Safety Code | Standards Michigan

Elevator Safety Code

The USER INTEREST in the development of this document is almost non--existent. One need only review the roster of technical committee members, their affiliation to get clear on this.

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Elevator Safety Code

May 22, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“Hudson River Waterfront” | Colin Campbell Cooper (1913)

Elevator and escalator systems are among the most complicated systems in any urban environment, no less so than on the emergent #SmartCampus in which many large research universities have 100 to 1000 elevators to safely and economically operate, service and continuously commission.  Some university elevator O&M units use a combination of in-house, manufacturer and standing order contractors to accomplish their safety and sustainability experts.   We are now seeing an expansion of the requirement to include software integration professionals to coordinate the interoperability of elevators, lifts and escalators with building automation systems for fire safety, indoor air quality and disaster management.

In the United States the American Society of Mechanical Engineers is the dominant standards developer of elevator and escalator systems.  It partitions safety discovery and promulgation into about 30 committees below:

A17 ELEVATORS AND ESCALATORS

The parent document for the entire span of ASME elevator safety codes — ASME A17.1 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators — is now deep into a new revision cycle.  As of this posting the parent A17 technical committee has not released any redlines that are open for public review.  When they are posted we will charge into them.

ASME Consensus Documents Open for Public Review

Two characteristics of the ASME standards development process are noteworthy:

  • Only the proposed changes to the BPVC are published.   The context surrounding a given change may be lost or not seen unless access to previous version is available.  Knowledgeable experts who contribute to the development of the BPVC usually have a previous version, however.  Newcomers to the process may not.
  • The BPVC has several breakout committees; owing to its longer history in the US standards system and the gathering pace of complexity in this technology.

We always encourage our colleagues to participate directly in the ASME standards development process.  CLICK HERE to get started.

All ASME standards are on the agenda of our monthly Mechanical Engineering and Elevator & Escalator teleconference.  See our CALENDAR for the next online teleconferences; open to everyone.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

 

Issue: [11-50]

Category: Electrical, Elevators, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


LEARN MORE:


ARCHIVE: Posted September 27, 2018

Many colleges, universities, academic medical research and healthcare delivery campuses have hundreds of elevators whose design, construction, operations and maintenance is highly regulated by local and state level public safety agencies.   More than a few large research universities have thousands of elevators and, at cost upwards of $100,000 per floor just to build them (apart from the cost of running a certified in-house maintenance and contractor management staff) elevators represent a significant component of the #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities. 

The deadline for submitting comments on the redline posted by ASME has since passed but it is possible to submit your ideas to the ASME A17 committees by attending the ASME “Elevator Week” in Austin, Texas, October 1 – 4 at the Holiday Inn Riverwalk in Austin, Texas.  More information is available in the link below:

ASME Elevator Week 2018

We will investigate whether any of the technical committee meetings are accessible online and open to the public.   In any case, the ASME A17 suite of documents is on our standing agenda.  Feel free to click in any day at 11 AM Eastern time to view the proposed changes to this, or any other, code or standard.

LIVE Daily 11:00 AM EDT

The ASME A17 Maintenance, Repair and Replacement Committee Meetings will take place at the National Association of Elevator Contractors Conference September 25th in Atlantic City — an apparent Producer Interest according to ANSI stakeholder criteria.  Colleges and Universities in the Atlantic City region are encouraged to attend as a User Interest.   There may be an opportunity to present #TotalCostofOwnership concepts to the incumbent interests on the committee.    CLICK HERE for more information.


Posted July 9, 2018

Many colleges, universities, academic medical research and healthcare delivery campuses have hundreds of elevators whose design, construction, operations and maintenance is highly regulated by local and state level public safety agencies.   More than a few large research universities have thousands of elevators and, at cost upwards of $100,000 per floor just to build them (apart from the cost of running a certified in-house maintenance and contractor management staff) elevators represent a significant component of the #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities. 

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) is the developer of the most widely adopted consensus standard incorporated by reference into public safety law for this core technology.  The redline (“strike-and-bold”) of candidate changes for next revision of the parent document — ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators — is now available for public comment.  You will find it on the ASME Codes & Standards web page linked below:

ASME Consensus Documents Open for Public Review

Comments are due August 8th.   You may comment directly to ASME through Geraldine Burdeshaw, (212) 591-8523, burdeshawg@asme.org with a copy of your comments to psa@ansi.org.

The original University of Michigan infrastructure standards advocacy enterprise advocated #TotalCostofOwnership concepts across the entire A17.1 suite for several cycles.  That work continues here (see ABOUT).   Some facts and observations about that experience with the ASME A17 suite are listed below:

  • The A17 suite is broken down into many sub-disciplines (CLICK HERE for overview of the entire suite)
  • The technical committees are composed almost entirely by market incumbents* who are able to finance the cost of their participation into the price of the product they sell to the user-interest as identified in Section 2.3 of ANSI’s Essential Requirements
  • The absence of user interests is not the fault of ASME — it is the fault of the user interest; in our case the education facilities industry (the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.
  • Candidate changes are developed largely by the members of the technical committee; though other stakeholders may submit their suggestions to the technical committee chairman through the ASME administrative staff identified above at any time.  Keep in mind that A17.1 is on a 5-year revision cycle.
  • Only the changes are shown in the public review document.  A full understanding of the context of the changes will require purchase of the entire document through ASME; or through access to the public edition of the code through state regulatory agencies.
  • The technical committees meet face-to-face 4 to 5 times a year so many of the proposed changes have been vetted well before the A17.1 is released for public review.
  • The 45-day public review period is permitted by ANSI but is a very narrow window of opportunity for the user interest.

We will host an online review and comment development teleconference on July 19th, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Eastern time which is open to everyone.   The entire ASME codes and standards suite is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.   CLICK HERE to log in.

Issue: [11-50]

Category: Architectural, Mechanical, Electrical, Telecommunications, Public Safety, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, David Flint, Larry Spielvogel

Link to Legacy Workspace


* Market incumbent.

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