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S. 2530 / School Safety Clearinghouse Act

Photo by Architect of the Capitol | Left: The teacher and children in a “little red schoolhouse” represent an important part of American education in the 1800s.
Right: Students attend a land grant college, symbolic of the national commitment to higher learning.

S. 2530: School Safety Clearinghouse Act

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a School Safety Clearinghouse, and for other purposes.


5.4.20

Disaster

Today at 11 AM/ET we update our understanding of the state of best practice literature for disaster avoidance, disaster management and disaster recovery.   We side-step the over-arching topic of the COVID-19 disaster because leading practice discovery and promulgation is well covered elsewhere in real time.

Disaster is Big Business in the education industry and others.    The disaster “domain” is characterized by niche vertical incumbents that have secured a silo of stakeholders that support a business model that has generally proven successful.  You cannot avoid many disasters but you can prepare for them.

We start with the consensus products of ANSI-accredited standards developing organizations and, time-permitting will review the current state of legislative proposals which, they they do no compete with privately developed standards setting organizations, fill the gaps that standard setting organization business models cannot.

A sample of the standards setting organizations in the disaster domain are listed below:

APCO International

ARMA International

Disaster Recovery Institute International

Emergency Management Accreditation Program

The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification

National Air Duct Cleaners Association

National Disaster Preparedness Consortium

There are many others – NFPA, IEEE, ICC, etc. (public safety vertical incumbents); many others driven by the conformance and insurance interests we identify in our ABOUT.

Open to everyone.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

Standing Agenda / Disaster

Storm Shelters

“Landscape between Storms” 1841 / Auguste Renoir

The International Code Council has released an exposure draft of its revisions to ICC/NSSA 500 Standard for the Design and Construction of Storm Shelters.  From the project prospectus:

The objective of this Standard is to provide technical design and performance criteria that will facilitate and promote the design, construction, and installation of safe, reliable, and economical storm shelters to protect the public. It is intended that this Standard be used by design professionals; storm shelter designers, manufacturers, and constructors; building officials; and emergency management personnel and government officials to ensure that storm shelters provide a consistently high level of protection to the sheltered public.

Comments are due August 10th.  The current 2014 edition of ICC 500 is also linked at the bottom of this page.

The ICC receives public response to proposed changes to its products at the link below

Standards Public Forms

Send comments to Kimberly Paarlberg (kpaarlberg@iccsafe.org) with optional copy to psa@ansi.org

The advantage of this approach is that it avoids some of the proprietary idiosyncrasies of specialty content management systems used by other standards setting organizations.  When the content is curated by ICC staff it is made available at the link below:

ICC cdpACCESS

We maintain this title on the agenda of our periodic Model Building Code and Disaster teleconferences which approach this product from the point of view of education community facility managers.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting, open to everyone. 

 


CLICK ON IMAGE

Readings / The Hartford Consensus

“After School” / Norman Rockwell

The last public comment intake step for NFPA’s Active Shooter/Hostile Event Response Program consensus product happened on February 19th.    Additional public engagement with this product is possible at the 2020 NFPA Annual Conference; though that has seen been cancelled.   It is likely that committees will be meeting online instead.  NFPA is pretty good at letting the world know what they are doing so we encourage to you keep pace from the project page linked above.

For the moment, it is worth noting that some of NFPA 3000 is built on the foundation of recommendations made by the American College of Surgeons — The Hartford Consensus — a consortia consensus product to inform the formulation of policies and procedures to enhance survivability from intentional mass casualty and active shooter events.

The Hartford Consensus

 

5.4.20

5.11.20

Open for Comment

This post is being re-coded to synchronize with our public commenting tracking algorithm. The technical substance is here but we are working to make it easier for our colleagues to keep pace and interact with it.

Our algorithm smashes horizontally through an expanding constellation best practice literature emanating from 1000-odd standard setting organizations every day.  These 1000-odd developers throw off the better part of 10,000 titles relevant to the safety and sustainability agenda of education communities.  These products compete with national, state and local legislative proposals — many which are drafted by contractors retained by incumbent stakeholders.

A sample of the action of ANSI-accredited standards setting organizations can be found in the weekly  ANSI Standards Action.   This publication reveals a relatively small part of the standards setting domain, however.  Open source and consortia standards setting organizations dominate leading practice discovery in faster-moving technologies and have open-ended commenting periods; not unlike ANSI’s continuous maintenance process which permits changes in as little as 30 days.

About 10 to 100 consensus products are open for comment on any given day.   On any given day, we typically identify the products we want to drill into, assign them a priority, then set up a separate markup session.


SYLLABUS: WEEK 27


 

Thursday | July 2, 2020

Today at 11 AM/ET we update our understanding of the state of best practice literature for disaster avoidance, disaster management and disaster recovery.   Disaster is Big Business in the education industry and others.

The disaster domain is characterized by niche vertical incumbents that have secured a silo of stakeholders that support a business model that has generally proven successful.  You cannot avoid many disasters but you can prepare for them.   That’s what these organizations do and there are the better part of 100 of them that directly affect education communities.

We start with the consensus products of ANSI-accredited standards developing organizations and, time-permitting. will review the current state of legislative proposals which, when they do not compete with proposals administered by privately developed standards setting organizations, fill gaps that standard setting organizations cannot; or cannot in a timely manner.

Open to everyone.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

Open for Comment / Disaster

 


Friday | July 3, 2020

 


Saturday | July 4, 2020

 


Sunday | July 5, 2020

 


Monday | July 6, 2020

Open for Comment / Water


SYLLABUS: WEEK 28

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*Not all public commenting opportunities relevant to the safety and sustainability agenda of the education facility industry appear in “ANSI Standards Action”. Many best practice standards reside in consortia and open-source platforms; particularly ICT and IoT standards. In many economic spaces, privately-developed consensus products compete with local, state and federal legislative proposals.

University of Michigan Legacy Workspace / 1993-2016

 

Emergency Management & Business Continuity

NFPA Standard 1600 — Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity/Continuity of Operations Programs — is in its 2022 revision cycle and is close-coupled with FEMA’s National Incident Management System.   As described on its title page, this product will be reconfigured as NFPA 1660 Standard on Community Risk Assessment, Pre-Incident Planning, Mass Evacuation, Sheltering, and Re-entry Programs.  For the moment, we continue to approach the substance of the forthcoming product as MFPA 1600 until the public input report is released; when we can see how the product is organized.

The original University of Michigan standards advocacy enterprise began advocating user-interest concepts for the US education facility industry in 2007 and achieved some changes that were useful to that industry in the 2010 revision.[1]   The reconstructed enterprise (see ABOUT) now resumes its attention to NFPA 1600 as the development of asset management standards for non-normal enterprise operations gathers pace globally.  

From the NFPA 1600 prospectus:

This standard shall establish a common set of criteria for all hazards disaster/emergency management and business continuity programs, hereinafter referred to as “the program. The Emergency Management and Business Continuity community comprises many different entities, including the government at distinct levels (e.g., federal, state/provincial, territorial, tribal, indigenous, and local levels); commercial business and industry; not-for-profit and nongovernmental organizations; and individual citizens. Each of these entities has its own focus, unique mission and responsibilities, varied resources and capabilities, and operating principles and procedures.

Related document — NFPA 1620 Standard for Pre-Incident Planning — is, remarkably, on a different developmental timetable. Its Second Draft will be posted for public comment on or before August 1, 2019.  We will be following that.

It is noteworthy that the NFPA 1620 technical committee is composed almost entirely by insurance and enforcement interests–fairly common across the entire sweep of American national standards that deal with public safety–but it presents a one-sided market of ideas for which the user interest pays.  There are no user interests from the education industry on the technical committees of either standard; raising the likelihood of market-making by stakeholders who benefit from litigation.

That is today’s editorial on the US consensus product development system.

Owing to the demand for emergency management and incident management templates the NFPA is consolidating the content of this project into a new combined product; title to be announced sometime later this year.   The announcement is reproduced below:

“This Standard is no longer accepting Public Input due to the Emergency Response and Responder Safety Document Consolidation Plan (consolidation plan) as approved by the NFPA Standards Council.  As part of the consolidation plan, this Standard is slipping cycle and being combined into a new consolidated draft.  Once the new draft is available and open for Public Input, this notice will be updated with a link to the applicable document information page.”

Public comment on the input received in January 2020 is due November 19th.  When the public review draft is released no later than September 10th, you may submit public input directly to NFPA by CLICKING HERE.

We maintain NFPA 1600 on the standing agenda of our monthly campus Security and State Regulation teleconferences.   See our  CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

 

Issue: [13-58] and [18-151]

Category: Public Safety, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Robert G. Arno, Jim Harvey, Richard Robben

ARCHIVE / Emergency Management and Business Continuity

 

Risk Assessment in Emergency Facilities

 

 

Critical Operations Power Systems: Improving Risk Assessment in Emergency Facilities with Reliability Engineering

University of Michigan | Ann Arbor, Michigan
HP Critical Facilities Services | Bethesda, Maryland
Mark Beirne

DLB Associates | Chicago, Illinois

Abstract. The key feature of this article is the application of quantitative method for evaluating risk and conveying the results into a power system design that is scaled according to hazards present in any given emergency management district. These methods employ classical lumped parameter modeling of power chain architectures and can be applied to any type of critical facility, whether it is a stand-alone structure, or a portion of stand-alone structure, such as a police station or government center. This article will provide a risk assessment roadmap for one of the most common critical facilities that should be designated as COPS per NEC 708-a 911 call center. The existing methods of reliability engineering will be used in the risk assessment.

 

* Robert Schuerger is the lead author on this paper

CLICK HERE to order complete article: IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Volume 19 Issue 5 • Sept.-Oct.-2013

 

Standards for Healthcare Personnel

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine

To Support COVID-19 Response, ANSI Launches Portal for Freely Available ISO Standards

CDC References Standards for Recommended Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel during Coronavirus Outbreak

Standards Idaho

“Shoshone Falls. Idaho” 1875 / Thomas Moran

As we explain in our ABOUT, we are continuing the development of the cadre of “code writers and vote-getters” begun at the University of Michigan in 1993.  We are now drilling down into state and local adaptations of nationally developed codes and standards that are incorporated by reference into public safety and sustainability legislation.

Standards Michigan remains the “free” home site but state-specific sites such as Standards Idaho will be accessible to subscribers.   Please send bella@standardsmichigan.com a request to join one of our mailing lists appropriate to your interest for #WiseCampus standards action in the State of Idaho. #StandardsIdaho


Electronic Municipal Market Access / Idaho

Standards Idaho Workspace

Sustainable cities & communities

Mexico City – Palacio Nacional. Mural by Diego Rivera showing the life in Aztec times, i.e., the city of Tenochtitlan

The United States Technical Advisory Group (US-TAG), with oversight by the American National Standards Institute and project administration by NFPA International, is participating in the development of an International Organization for Standardization consensus document that will shape policy development for smart cities (sustainable cities and communities).   The ISO Global Secretariat is ANSI’s French counterpart Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR) as shown in the map below.

As cities-within-cities, major international research universities are stakeholders in these discussions because of the town-gown infrastructure interface in the emergent #SmartCampus.  We have been participants in this project since 2014:

Click here for the Business Plan.

Consensus documents emerging from ISO/TC 268 tend to be large, fast-moving and highly interdependent.  Drafts for US stakeholder comment and balloting arrive frequently as new workgroups are spawned from the core ISO TC/268 committees.

CLICK ON IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Access to “commentable” draft documents is limited to US TAG members however ANSI has arranged for restrictions to be lifted for circulation among US stakeholders.  Those who would like to participate should communicate directly with Robert Solomon (rsolomon@nfpa.org) and/or Linda MacKay (lmackay@nfpa.org) at NFPA International, the US TAG Administrator for this project.

We are happy to review these documents online during our Global Standardsteleconference; the next shown on our CALENDAR.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

Harvard University

 

1 July 2020:

No drafts open for comment

15 June 2020:

ISO/FDIS 37163 Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on Smart Transportation for Parking Lot Allocation in Cities.   Comments due June 22nd

7 May 2020:

ISO / DIS 37167 Smart Community Infrastructures – Smart Transportation for Energy Saving Operation by Slowly Driving Intentionally.  Comments due June 5th.

1 May 2020:

ISO/CD 37166 Smart Community Infrastructures – Urban Data Integration Framework for Smart City Planning.   Comments due May 21st.

21 April 2020:

No drafts open for comment

19 March 2020:

ISO/NP Reserved 37180  Smart community infrastructures — Guidance on smart transportation with QR code identification/authentification in transportation and its related/additional services    Comments due April 9th

11 March 2020:

ISO/ DIS 37106 Sustainable Cities and Communities – Guidance on Establishing Smart City Operating Models for Sustainable Communities – Amendment 1.   Comments due by March 18th

3 February 2020:

ISO/FDIS 37160 Smart Community Infrastructure – Electric Power Infrastructure – Measurement Methods for the Quality of Thermal Power Infrastructure and Requirements for Plant Operations and Management.   Comments due by February 17th

13 January 2020 Update:

No exposure drafts open for comment at this time.

26 December 2019 Update:

ISO/FDIS 37162 Smart Community Infrastructures – Smart Transportation for Newly Developing Areas.  Comments due 9 January 2020

4 December 2019 Update:

ISO/DIS 37165 Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on Smart Transportation by Non-cash Payment for Fare/Fees in Transportation and its Related or Additional Services.  Comments due 18 December 2019

WG4 TR— Data exchange and sharing for community infrastructure based on Geoinformation.  Comments due 18 December 2019

WG4 TR Smart Community Infrastructures Report of Pilot Project on the Application of SC1 Deliverables.  Comments due 18 December 2019

4 November 2019 Update:

ISO/NP 37169 Smart Community Infrastructures –Smart Transportation by Run-Through Train/Bus Operation in/between Cities.  Comments due November 20th

ISO/NP 37168 Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on Smart Transportation for Autonomous Shuttle Services Using Connected Autonomous Electric Vehicles (eCAVs).  Comments due November 20th

ISO/FDIS 37155 Framework for Integration and Operation of Smart Community Infrastructures – Recommendations for Considering Opportunities and Challenges from Interactions in Smart Community Infrastructures from Relevant Aspects through the Life Cycle.  Comments due November 20th

7 October 2019 Update:

ISO/FDIS 37123 Sustainable Cities and Communities – Indicators for Resilient Cities.  Comments due October 29th

25 September 2019 Update:

ISO/NP 24609 Smart Community Infrastructures – Data and Framework of Digital Technology Apply in Smart City Infrastructure Governance.  Comments due October 3rd

10 September 2019 Update:

ISO/FDIS 37105 Sustainable Cities and Communities – Descriptive Framework for Cities and Communities.  Comments due September 19th

2 August 2019 Update:

ISO/CD 37164 Smart community infrastructures — Smart transportation using fuel cell light rail transportation.  Comments due August 16th

ISO/DIS 37163 Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on Smart Transportation for Parking Lot Allocation in Cities.  Comments due August 19th

1 August 2019 Update:

ISO/NP 37167 Smart Community Infrastructures — Smart Transportation for Energy Saving by Intentionally Slowly Driving.  Comments due August 12th

July 28, 2019 Update:

ISO/CD 37155-2 Framework for Integration and Operation of Smart Community Infrastructures- Part 2: Holistic Approach and the Strategy for Development, Operation and Maintenance of Smart Community Infrastructures.  Comments due August 1st.

June 25, 2019 Update:

 ISO / DIS 37160 Smart Community Infrastructure – Measurement Methods for Quality of Thermal Power Station Infrastructure and Requirements for Plant Operations and Management.   Comments due July 12th

June 5, 2019 Update:

No commentable documents at this time.

May 22, 2019 Update:

ISO/DIS 37161 Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on Smart Transportation for Energy Saving in Transportation Services in Cities.  Comments due June 5th

May 16, 2019 Update:

No commentable documents at this time.   We walk through all transportation-related standards action on May 16th.

April 29, 2019 Update:

ISO NP 37166 New Work Item Proposed:  Smart Community Infrastructures.  Specification of Multi-Source Urban Data Integration for Smart City Planning.  Comments due May 14th

March 14, 2019 Update:

ISO/FDIS 37122 Sustainable Cities and Communities – Indicators for Smart Cities | Comments due April 2nd.

February 19, 2019 Update:

ISO/FDIS 37104 Sustainable Cities and Communities – Transforming Our Cities – Guidance for Practical Local Implementation of ISO 37101 | Comments due February 15th

ISO NP 23944 (N330) New Work Item Proposed:  Smart Community Infrastructures – Guidance on smart Transportation by Non-Cash payment for Fare/Fees in Transportation and its Related or Additional Services | Comments due February 15th

Ballot for ISO NP 23943 (N328) New Work Item Proposed:  Smart Community Infrastructures – Smart Transportation using Fuel Cell LRT | Comments due February 15th

January 24, 2019 Update:

ISO/DIS 37123 Sustainable cities and communities — Indicators for resilient cities.  Ballots due February 8th

Some amount of the commentable material cannot be distributed and must be viewed online (a chronic problem).  Click in to any of our daily 11 AM EST teleconferences if you would like to read and mark up with comments.

December 18, 2018 Update:

No commentable documents at this time

November 1, 2018 Update:

ISO / DIS 37155 Framework for Integration and Operation of Smart Community Infrastructures – Part 1: Opportunities and Challenges from Interactions in Smart Community Infrastructures from all Aspects through the Life Cycle.

* Owing to copyright restrictions you must send an email to bella@standardsmichigan.com to access to the documents

https://standardsmichigan.com/iso-267-access-to-documents-open-to-public-review/

  Comments are due November 19th

October 1, 2018 Update:

Comments due October 5th:

14-101 ISO 268 Item ISO IEC 17021 Public Review Draft

September 18, 2018 Update:

Comments are due September 24th on the documents linked below:

14-101 ISO WD TS 37107 SEPT 2018 Sustainable Cities

14-101 ISO CD 37160 SEPT 2018 Sustainable Cities

September 16, 2018 Update:

The US TAG convened at NFPA Headquarters last this week.   Since some of the material is copyright protected, we welcome education facility professionals to click in any day at 11 AM to review the commenting opportunities open to US stakeholders generally, and education industry professionals specifically.

Draft document now open for public review: Smart community infrastructures — Guidance on smart transportation for allocation of parking lots in cities. (ISO Stage 20.20) Comments are due at NFPA on September 13th

US TAG meets at NFPA Headquarters in Quincy, Massachusetts September 12 and 13.   Mike Anthony will be in attendance.

August 2018 Update:

Draft document now open for public review: Sustainable development in communities — Indicators for Smart Cities.  Comments are due at NFPA on August 27th.

Draft document now open for public review: Guidelines on Data Exchange and Sharing for Smart Community Infrastructures.  Comments are due at NFPA on August 24th 

One draft document is now open for public review:   Smart community infrastructures — Smart transportation for rapid transit in/between large city zones and the surrounding areas (ISO/DIS 37159).   Comments are due at NFPA on August 7th. 

July 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  US TAG will meet in at NFPA headquarters, September 12-13, 2018

June 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  The US TAG is planning a September on-site meeting at NFPA Headquarters in Boston.

May 2018 Update:

Balloting was completed by the US TAG on proposed ISO/FDIS 37120 Sustainable Development in Communities – Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life

April 2018 Update:

At the 2017 Paris meeting of TC/268, the UK suggested that it would be helpful to develop an overall maturity model for cities, drawing on the framework set out by SC1 in ISO/DIS 37153. The TC agreed, and WG4 was asked to work up proposals.

At its Berlin meeting in May, WG4 made good progress and recommended a way forward. But in plenary discussion with other working groups, there was concern that WG4 was moving too quickly and on too narrowly‐focused a basis

The purpose of a recent release by ISO TC/268 — an outline of city “maturity models” — is to respond to those concerns, proposing a broader framework for future work in this area across TC/268

ISO TC 268 City Maturity Model Presentation

An explanation of the broad contours of parent standard — with the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR Groupas the Secretariat — is described in the videoclip below:

Issue: [14-101] and [18-5]

Category: #SmartCampus, Informatics, Administration & Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Jack Janveja, John Kaczor, Richard Robben, David Welsh


LEARN MORE:

NIST: Developing a consensus Framework for Smart City Architectures

ANSI Coverage of European Standards Action

University of Michigan Legacy Workspace

*  Permission is granted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to electronically reproduce this draft International Standard for purpose of review and comment related to the preparation of the U.S. position, provided this notice is included.  All other rights are reserved.

 

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