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Consulting System for University Athletic Sports

CLICK ON IMAGE

Analysis and Design of Consulting System for University Athletic Sports

Babak Moatamed – Sajad Darabi – Migyeong Gwak – Mohammad Kachuee – Casey Metoyer – Mike Linn

 

Many coaches and athletes are showing an increasing interest in training monitoring systems every year. There is a plethora of performance markers that can aid in a coaches assessment of physiological and psychological conditions of their athletes. These markers can indicate an athletes readiness for competition, adaptation to training, or risk for injury. However, studies have shown examination of these performance markers individually may not result in a clear perception of ones performance. Hence, an inclusive analysis of these metrics is required to achieve meaningful assessment. Recently with the growing use of wearable activity trackers, we have access to many of these markers. Currently, there are a few sport monitoring tools which are using a subset of these metrics and are mostly providing real-time data visualization to coaching staff. However, an appropriate athletic performance monitoring system should be intuitive, provide useful data analysis, feedback and reliable predictions to coaches and athletes. In this paper, we are proposing an athletic monitoring system which collects a comprehensive set of metrics and visualize them in real-time and informs coaches about athlete’s readiness score.

 

Published in: 2017 IEEE Healthcare Innovations and Point of Care Technologies (HI-POCT)

Campus Fire Safety Month

Photo by Architect of the Capitol

Left: The teacher and children in a “little red schoolhouse” represent an important part of American education in the 1800s.  Right: Students attend a land grant college, symbolic of the national commitment to higher learning.

 

RESOLUTION

Expressing support for the designation of September 2019 as Campus Fire Safety Month.

Whereas student-related housing fires in Texas, Oregon, Illinois, Washington, DC, Pennsylvania, and other schools across the country have tragically cut short the lives of some of the youth of the Nation;

Whereas, since January 2000, at least 175 people, including students, parents, and children have died in college-related fires;

Whereas approximately 87 percent of these deaths have occurred in off-campus occupancies;

Whereas a majority of the students across the Nation live in off-campus occupancies;

Whereas a number of fatal fires have occurred in buildings where the fire safety systems have been compromised or disabled by the occupants;

Whereas it is recognized that automatic fire alarm systems and smoke alarms provide the necessary early warning to occupants and the fire department of a fire so that appropriate action can be taken;

Whereas it is recognized that automatic fire sprinkler systems are a highly effective method of controlling or extinguishing a fire in its early stages, protecting the lives of the building’s occupants;

Whereas many students are living in off-campus occupancies, Greek housing, and residence halls that are not adequately protected with automatic fire sprinkler systems and automatic fire alarm systems or adequate smoke alarms;

Whereas it is recognized that fire safety education is an effective method of reducing the occurrence of fires and reducing the resulting loss of life and property damage;

Whereas students are not routinely receiving effective fire safety education throughout their entire college career;

Whereas it is vital to educate the future generation of the Nation about the importance of fire safety behavior so that these behaviors can help to ensure their safety during their college years and beyond; and

Whereas by developing a generation of fire-safe adults, future loss of life from fires can be significantly reduced: Now, therefore, be it

 

Energy Standard for Buildings

“Painting Competition” (2013) / Rida Maryam Qureshi United States Agency for International Development

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (a major contributor to what we call a regulatory product development “stream”).   Continuous maintenance means that changes to its consensus products can change in as little as 30 days so it is wise to keep pace.

ASHRAE has released another batch of candidate changes to its flagship product — ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings — all of which affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities because they are heavily referenced in local, state and federal energy legislation.   Standard 90.1 has been a benchmark for commercial building energy codes in the United States and a key basis for codes and standards around the world for more than 35 years.  Free access to ASHRAE 901. is available at the link below:

READ-ONLY Version of 2016 ASHRAE 90,1

Note that ASHRAE 90.1 is co-developed with the Illumination Engineering Society (IES) because. among other reasons, about 35 percent of electrical energy in a typical building is owed to lighting load and the heat throw associated with that lighting load.   Also, unlike the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) which would seem to be a natural home for leading practice discovery in electrotechnology energy conservation, the IES has developed a cadre of subject matter experts financially supported by incumbent stakeholders and therefore you will find market-making code writing tracking in ASHRAE 90.1.  The IEEE is more closely aligned with the user interest in the global standards system; thus our alignment with the IEEE on electrotechnology; though the IEEE produces far fewer consensus products suitable for incorporation by reference into public safety and sustainability legislation than does ASHRAE.

ASHRAE leads the development of another, related consensus product — ANSI/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1-2017, Standard for the Design of High Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings — which we also follow; covered in other posts.   Much of the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) is informed by the ideas that track through it; covered in separate posts.  With fast-moving Memoranda of Understanding among standards developers in the energy space, there is plenty of action relevant to the education facility industry  in both ASHRAE 189.1 and the IgCC.

That much said, ASHRAE has developed one of the best public-commenting facilities among the 300-odd ANSI accredited standards developers; linked below

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

We draw your attention to Addendum by, Addendum da and Addendum db; all three of which will affect building energy systems design and conformance activity.

Comments are due September 22nd.

Education industry facility managers, energy conservation workgroups, sustainability officers, electric shop foreman, electricians and front-line maintenance professionals who change lighting flxtures, maintain environmental air systems are encouraged to participate directly in the ASHRAE consensus standard development process.   Also, the next ASHRAE Annual meeting takes place in Orlando, Florida, February 1-5, 2020 and attendance at any of ASHRAE’s standards development committee meetings would be relatively convenient for our colleagues in the Orlando region.  CLICK HERE for more information about this conference.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our daily teleconferences every day, 11 AM Eastern time.  We also pull together all mechanical engineering standards once per month and knock around ideas for responding to proposed changes or developing proposals of our own.   See our CALENDAR for the next Mechanical Engineering and Energy Standards teleconference.  Use the same login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy Conservation, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben

#StandardsGeorgia #StandardsFlorida

 


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ARCHIVE / ASHRAE 90.1 ENERGY STANDARD FOR BUILDINGS

US Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program

 

Standards Arizona

As we explain in our ABOUT, we are continuing the development of the cadre of “code writers and vote-getters” begun at the University of Michigan in 1993.  We are now drilling down into state and local adaptations of nationally developed codes and standards that are incorporated by reference into public safety and sustainability legislation.

This post is a “test pancake” for generating discussion, and for developing a way forward for crafting state exceptions to nationally developed codes and standards.  Every state will have to be managed according to its history, culture, governance regime, asset-base and network of expertise.

Standards Michigan will remain the “free” home site but state-specific sites such as Standards Arizona will be accessible to user-interest code-writers and vote-getters.   Please send bella@standardsmichigan.com a request to join one of our mailing lists appropriate to your interest for #SmartCampus standards action in the State of Arizona.

Connected & Automated Vehicle Code

Satire on Steam Coaches (1831) / H. T. Alken

The CSA America Standards organization has launched a new consensus product — CSA T150 Connected & Automated Vehicle Code — that may, at the very least, guide the safety and sustainability agenda of many large research universities that have transportation service units.   Many governments direct research funding toward transportation so this product may inform the practicality of academic research.  The CSA Group announcement, made through ANSI’s Project Initiation Notification platform, is paraphrased below:

Project Need: To support innovation and deployment in the field of connected and autonomous vehicles by providing infrastructure requirements for the installation and safe operations of CAVs and corresponding infrastructure in the North American context.  

Stakeholders: This proposed Code is being developed at the request of industry and manufacturers. It will provide the industry with the technical requirements and standards of safe operation of CAVs. This will meet the strategic needs of the following key interests:

(a) Ensuring that the latest innovative/technology/safety features are available for users,

(b) Addressing needs of regulators by providing suitable requirements;

(c) Supporting certification bodies.

The connected and automated vehicle (CAV) code specifies infrastructure requirements for CAVs operating or intended to operate in both on-road and off-road environments in order to address public safety, security, and privacy challenges. The code includes, but is not limited to, physical and digital infrastructure. Consideration is given to cybersecurity, interoperability, data management, data privacy, data integrity, human aspects, and accessibility. The CAV code is intended to primarily address issues related to public safety, security, and privacy in conjunction with detailed knowledge of the legal, regulatory, and technological landscape, and ensuring compliance with all relevant and applicable law. The CAV code is not intended as a design specification nor as an instruction manual for untrained persons.

No comments are due at this time. 

Having been involved in global standards development for over 25 years now (See our ABOUT) we are qualified to say that this is an ambitious undertaking and certain to inspire competition among competitor conformance and certification organizations.   Accordingly, we will follow the developmental path of the proposed “Code” ; perhaps participate as a user-interest in its development.   We also encourage direct participation in the CSA Group’s standards development program by students, faculty and staff in the education industry.

CSA Group Standards Home Page

Standards Michigan will continue to be a resource for education facility managers, academic researchers and any other final fiduciary (user-interest) in the public or private sector who need cross-cutting perspective on the “bazillion silos” of global standards development.  Accordingly CSA T150 has been placed on the standing agenda of our monthly Transportation & Parking teleconference.   See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

Photo Credit: Center for Digital Education

Issue: [19-146]

Category: Transportation & Parking

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Paul Green, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

Source: ANSI Standards Action


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Smart Grid & Smart Energy Standards

Electrical building — World Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois (1892)

We participate as a “user-interest” on the US National Committee of the International Electrotechnical Commission (USNC) that is developing an international standard for Smart Grid and Smart City concepts.   We also collaborate with other US-based and other international universities through several societies of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers through its networking facility — Collabratec.

The Association of Medical Imaging and Electrical Equipment Manufacturers (NEMA) — the Administrator of the USNC /IEC Technical Advisory Group of the USNA/IEC — has released material for US stakeholders to review.   The concepts within these documents should interest both the academic and business side of the education industry in any nation.

Because of copyright restrications upon draft material — very common in the development of regulatory products — we must be mindful of releasing the full text of draft documents.   We are able, however, to provide a broad overview of the most recent batch of proposed refinements to the IEC Smart City standardization project:

IEC/USNA/IEC Workspace

The ambitions of this batch of documents is to formalize the landscape of the emergent Smart City (and, accordingly, #SmartCampus) by doing the following:

  • Providing the rationale for the market relevance of the future standards being produced in the parent IEC technical committee.
  • Providing an indication of global or regional sales of products or services related to the TC/SC work and state the source of the data.
  • Providing standards that will be significantly effective for assessing regulatory compliance.

In late June, through NEMA,  we received another update on the SyC Smart Energy/110/INF that shows eleven development plans which have been selected to be the most essential for achieving
Smart Energy related standardization works. Selection was made by the voting by TCs /NCs followed by ranking process, checking Pros and Cons for resolutions.   It is rather nettlesome stuff — the “skunkworks” of what we call “code-writing and vote getting” so we will refer this item to the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times per month in both European and American time zones and open to everyone.

Issue: [15-197]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Paul Green, Jim Harvey, Massimo Mittolo

Colleagues: Mahesh Illindala (Ohio State University), Giuseppe Parisi (Sapienza University of Roma), Loren Clark (University of Alberta). Jim Murphy (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory: University of California Berkeley),  Brian Marchionini (NEMA), Paul Green (University of Michigan)

Category: Electrical, Telecommunications, Energy Management, #SmartCampus, Informatics, Information & Communications Technology

LINK TO ARCHIVE


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Service requirements for distance learning

Hans Christian Ørsted discovers electromagnetism / Københavns Universitet

We follow the gathering pace of international distance learning enterprises with particular interest in its technical foundation for quality and availability.   International Telecommunication Union Recommendation F.742 provides the service description and the requirements for distance learning services. This Recommendation is intended to support the multimedia framework for distance learning services.  From the project description:

“…Distance learning involves interactive and non-interactive multimedia communications between learners and learning resources located at two or more separate locations. The aims of learners who use distance learning services may be to get some degree certificates based on the degree standards, to get training given by employers, or to learn special knowledge independently. The distance learning services may be teaching-centred learning services that are similar to traditional face-to-face classroom learning, individual instruction, self-pacing learning, multi-role learning/team learning, etc.

In the course of distance learning, information may be required from remote databases containing the learning resources, or from live lectures. The material may be textual, aural, graphical, or video in nature and may be stored in a multimedia format. The information can be delivered in point-to-point configuration, point-to-multipoint or multipoint-to-multipoint configuration.
Participants in the distance learning may be located in classrooms equipped with related facilities, offices, homes or other places, such as on trains, where they are able to access to a distance learning services platform. Learners may learn in real-time with or without interaction with others, following a curriculum schedule or in non-real-time by themselves on demand. The equipment that learners use may be a PC, PDA, mobile phone, or even a TV set with STU. Learners can change their equipment without interruption while they are learning, with the assistance of a DLSP…”

Note that the last revision became effective in 2005; and was re-affirmed in 2008.  Other ITU documents relevant to the education industry can be found on the page linked below:

ITU-T Recommendations

We normally coordinate our engagement with ITU standards with the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets four times monthly in European and American time zones.  We discuss any consensus product that affects the education industry every day at 11 AM Eastern time.  We also host a monthly teleconference on telecommunication standards.  See our CALENDAR for the next online meeting; open to everyone.

Issue: [8-8]

Category: Academics, Electrical, Information and Communication Technology, Telecommunications

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Mike Hiler

 


LEARN MORE:

Physical Security of Water Utilities

 

Many school districts, colleges and universities are affected by the flooding in the Central United States this week; inspiration enough for revisiting the technical and management codes and standards to avoid and/or mitigate damages.   The consensus documents developed by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and its affiliate institute — Environmental Water Resource Institute (EWRI) — should appear in the design guidelines given to professional services firms retained by the facility construction, operations and maintenance workgroups.  We encourage our colleagues in these units to update their design guidelines with the latest versions of the documents linked below:

ASCE/EWRI 56: Guidelines for the Physical Security of Water Utilities.  These water utility guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons.

ASCE/EWRI 57: Guidelines for the Physical Security of Wastewater/Stormwater Utilities.   These wastewater/stormwater utilities guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons. Additional requirements and security equipment may be necessary to defend against threats with greater capabilities.

Note that these documents are “paired” for the obvious reason that potable water systems must be separate from all other water systems.

No redlines are open for public comment at this time.  No open redlines does not mean that ASCE standards development committees are not receptive to operating and maintenance “war stories” that might have a standardization solutions. however.  We encourage direct engagement by education industry leaders, their engineering consultants, or municipal water management experts to participate in the development of these standards through the ASCE standards portal:

ASCE Standards Public Comment Page

You will need to set up an access account.  You may also communicate directly with the American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Dr., Reston, VA 20191.  Contact: James Neckel (jneckel@asce.org).   Note that ASCE’s Annual Conference is hosted October 10-13 in Miami Florida.  CLICK HERE for registration information.  We encourage our colleagues in #StandardsFlorida to attend this conference for a front row seat on technical committee action.

As of this posting, ASCE has another standard open for public review — Standard Guidelines for Managed Aquifer Recharge —  but we will place this on the agenda of the monthly Food Safety & Sustainability teleconference.   Comments on this standard are due September 9th  Access the commenting facility linked above.

We are open every day at 11 AM Eastern time to discuss technical specifics of these, and all other consensus documents affecting #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities.  We also devote one hour per month walking through all other consensus standards devoted to Water Management issues.  See our CALENDAR for the next teleconference; open to everyone.

 

Issue: [18-52]

Category: Civil Engineering, Water, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

#StandardsFlorida


LEARN MORE:

 

 


ARCHIVE: Posted September 17, 2018

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and its affiliate institute — Environmental Water Resource Institute (EWRI) — have released redline  drafts of its jointly developed consensus documents for water infrastructure safety:

ASCE/EWRI 56: Guidelines for the Physical Security of Water Utilities.  These water utility guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons.

ASCE/EWRI 57: Guidelines for the Physical Security of Wastewater/Stormwater Utilities.   These wastewater/stormwater utilities guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons. Additional requirements and security equipment may be necessary to defend against threats with greater capabilities.

Comment Deadline: October 29, 2018

We encourage direct engagement by education industry leaders, their engineering consultants, or municipal water management experts to participate in the development of these standards through the ASCE standards portal:

ASCE Standards Public Comment Page

You will need to set up an access account.  You may also communicate directly with the American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Dr., Reston, VA 20191.  Contact: James Neckel (jneckel@asce.org)

Our monthly breakout teleconference for campus water management standards is scheduled for October 19th, 11 AM Eastern time.   Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

 

Issue: [18-52]

Category: Civil Engineering, Water, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

ANSI Standards Action | PDF Pages 5-6

 


ARCHIVE: Posted June 1, 2018

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and its affiliate institute — Environmental Water Resource Institute (EWRI) — has released a redline draft of its jointly developed consensus document: ASCE/EWRI 56-10 an 57-10 Guidelines for the Physical Security of Water Utilities.  According to ANSI due process procedures, the current 2014 document is entering its 5-year reaffirmation/revision cycle for the 2019 edition.  ANSI’s due process procedures assure that consensus documents are optimally suitable for incorporation into federal, state and local government public safety law.*

From the project prospectus:

Scope: These water utility guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons.

Project Need: Guidelines for physical security for facilities used in potable water source, treatment, and distribution systems.

Stakeholders: Utility staff.

This document (and supplement) is 134 pages long.  Access to draft changes are restricted to stakeholders with approved login credentials.

Comments are due July 2, 2018.  Because many research universities have healthcare delivery campuses, district energy and fire protection systems that are dependent upon water supply and wastewater security — with complex interdependencies upon the municipal and/or utility systems —  we regard this guideline as a priority and an opportunity to contribute to setting the standard of care for the safety and sustainability of those systems owned and operated by education facility industry operations and maintenance units.

You are encouraged to visit the ASCE Standards Public Comment Page and/or communicate directly with the American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Dr., Reston, VA 20191.  Contact: James Neckel (jneckel@asce.org)

Click on image

All ASCE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11:00 AM Eastern time — to which everyone is welcomed.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We hope to collaborate with workpoint experts such as tradespersons, shop foremen, design engineers and front-line campus security experts in district energy and healthcare delivery systems for specific technical recommendations.

Issue: [18-52]

Category: Civil Engineering, Water, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben, James R. Harvey

Ohio State University

 

Link to ANSI Standards Action Announcement | PDF Page 14

 

Blockchain Application for Disaster Management

Siddhartha wins at Mathematics at Borobudur

Mohit Singh Panesir

Graduate School of the University at Buffalo, State University of New York

 

Natural phenomena such as floods, storms, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides have affected our planet in an unpredictable way. However, these phenomena are merely classified as a hazard when they may affect people and the things they value (Cutter, 2005). The involvement of many agencies and the public is important in planning for disaster relief, in rescuing victims, and in managing the event. A lot of individuals are deprived of help due to poor coordination, late assistance and uneven distribution of food, water, medical assistance, clothes, and vehicles. The need for a proper disaster relief plan is crucial to overcome these challenges. On the other hand, identity theft is one of the most bizarre and rapidly growing crimes present in the world. Identity thieves are active more than ever as the e-commerce trading keeps on growing. Earlier the thieves used to buy pieces and parts of someone’s personal identification information but now they could have hold of everything. Similarly there has been an increase in illegal immigration, smuggling of weapons and terrorist activities noticed in last 2 decades in the United States. This study focuses on the current condition of disaster management, identity theft, border security and controlling the misuse of weapon of mass destruction. It proposes the use of advanced technological methods like Blockchain to overcome the loss of time and cost to provide a quick response to the victims and to provide secure ways to store personal identification information and better national security. The study helps to understand how better disaster management and national security can be achieved by using various use cases and implementation models. By implementing these models, the border security can be improved and proper handling of weapons of mass destruction can also take place.

University at Buffalo

 

 

 

 

 

Stray Voltage: Sources and Solutions

Michigan State University

Stray Voltage: Sources and Solutions

Truman C. Surbrook – Norman D. Reese – Angela M. Kehrle

 

Abstract.  Stray voltage is caused by voltage drop and ground faults and may have its origin on the primary electrical distribution system or on the customer’s secondary electrical system. The rms value of the neutral-to-earth voltage along a primary distribution line may be at a value of zero some distance from the substation depending on the condition of the conductor resistances, grounding resistances, and the amount of load. Neutral-to-earth resistance is not the cause of stray voltage; however, the value of this resistance to earth at a particular location will affect the level of stray voltage. A four-wire single-phase feeder system supplying farm buildings from a single metering point is effective in preventing on-farm secondary neutral voltage drop, provided the four-wire system is extended to all farm loads, and provided no high-magnitude ground faults are present. Isolation of the primary and secondary neutral systems at the distribution transformer is effective in preventing off-farm sources from entering the customer’s system. This separation may be accomplished using a number of commercially available devices.

CLICK HERE for access to entire paper

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