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ASCE/EWRI 56 | Physical Security of Water Utilities

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and its affiliate institute — Environmental Water Resource Institute (EWRI) — has released a redline draft of its jointly developed consensus document: ASCE/EWRI 56-10 an 57-10 Guidelines for the Physical Security of Water Utilities.  According to ANSI due process procedures, the current 2014 document is entering its 5-year reaffirmation/revision cycle for the 2019 edition.  ANSI’s due process procedures assure that consensus documents are optimally suitable for incorporation into federal, state and local government public safety law.*

From the project prospectus:

Scope: These water utility guidelines recommend physical and electronic security measures for physical protection systems to protect against identified adversaries, referred to as the design basis threats (DBTs), with specified motivation, tools, equipment, and weapons.

Project Need: Guidelines for physical security for facilities used in potable water source, treatment, and distribution systems.

Stakeholders: Utility staff.

This document (and supplement) is 134 pages long.  Access to draft changes are restricted to stakeholders with approved login credentials.

Comments are due July 2, 2018.  Because many research universities have healthcare delivery campuses, district energy and fire protection systems that are dependent upon water supply and wastewater security — with complex interdependencies upon the municipal and/or utility systems —  we regard this guideline as a priority and an opportunity to contribute to setting the standard of care for the safety and sustainability of those systems owned and operated by education facility industry operations and maintenance units.

You are encouraged to visit the ASCE Standards Public Comment Page and/or communicate directly with the American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Dr., Reston, VA 20191.  Contact: James Neckel (jneckel@asce.org)

Click on image

All ASCE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11:00 AM Eastern time — to which everyone is welcomed.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We hope to collaborate with workpoint experts such as tradespersons, shop foremen, design engineers and front-line campus security experts in district energy and healthcare delivery systems for specific technical recommendations.

Issue: [18-52]

Category: Civil Engineering, Water, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

Ohio State University

 

Link to ANSI Standards Action Announcement | PDF Page 14

 

NFPA 101 | Life Safety Code

It is not too soon to begin preparing public input for the 2021 edition of NFPA 101: Life Safety Code.  The Life Safety Code is the most widely used source for strategies to protect people based on building construction, protection, and occupancy features that minimize the effects of fire and related hazards. Unique in the field, it is the only document that covers life safety in both new and existing structures.

We have been advocating in this document since the 2003 edition in which we submitted candidate code changes such as the following:

• Student residence facility life safety crosswalk between NFPA 101 and IBC

• Refinements to Chapters 14 and 15 covering education facilities

• Identification of an ingress path for rescue and recovery personnel toward electric service equipment installations.

• Risk-informed requirement for installation of grab bars in bathing areas

• Modification of the 90 minute emergency lighting requirements rule for small buildings and for fixed interval testing

• Modification of emergency illumination fixed interval testing

• Table 7.3.1 Occupant Load revisions

• Harmonization of egress path width with European building codes

There are others.  It is typically difficult to make changes to any consensus standard though some of the concepts were integrated by the committee into other parts of the NFPA 101 in unexpected, though productive, ways.

Public input is due June 27, 2018.  We reach out to facility managers, subject matter experts and trade associations — collaborating where possible – but at least reporting on the progress made on behalf of the user/owner/final fiduciary in this industry.  This document is a standing item on our weekly (Wednesday 11 AM Eastern) Open Door teleconference to which everyone is welcomed.   Click here to log in.

Issue: [18-90]

Category: Fire Safety, Public Safety

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Josh Elvove, Joe DeRosier

Link to legacy workspace: Fire Protection for the Education Facilities Industry


 

 

ICC | Proposed Building Code Changes

Mesa Community College

The International Code Council released the 2018 Report of the Committee Action Hearings on the 2018 Editions of the Group A International Codes two weeks ago.  The 313 page monograph linked below contains the results of the balloting of all Group A codes:

Report: 2018 – 2019 Code Development Cycle Group A

Public comments are due July 16th.  These concepts will eventually be incorporated by reference into state building codes and thereby affect #TotalCostofOwnership.

We have begun our examination of the monograph regarding means of egress concepts — for which the ICC has a designated committee — with special attention to the concepts that will effect planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance of the built environment for the education industry.   Means of egress (MOE) concepts inform the application of all other building technologies such as mechanical, electrical, fire protection and security systems.   Egress concepts developed by the ICC are conveyed into NFPA’s National Electrical Code, for example.   Mechanical systems for smoke control are designed around egress concepts.  The number and orientation of occupant access and egress points is high on the agenda of public safety professionals charged with protecting educational campus communities.

A listing of means of egress concepts that appear in the monograph has been distilled by the ICC Building Code Action Committee and is linked below:

ICC 2018-2019 Code Development Cycle MOE Concepts

We have set aside two working sessions to examine and prepare responses to the ICC invitation for public comment.

June 21st: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

July 12th: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

We welcome the participation of subject matter experts who service the education industry who are skilled in marking up legislative documents such as the International Building Code.  Additionally, we keep all ICC consensus products on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference (which we host every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time).  Anyone is welcomed to join us with the login information linked below:

Contact

 


Original post: April 23, 2018

Greater Columbus Convention Center | ICC Group A Code Hearings April 15-25, 2018The International Code Council (ICC) will host the final day of hearings on candidate revisions to its Group A Codes.   These include the International Building Code which establishes the standard of care for design, construction, operation and maintenance of education and university-affiliated healthcare facilities, in most of the United States   The hearings — 10 days for about 12 hours each day — are an impressive event which is livestreamed at the link  below.

Webcast

As we have for the past several revision cycles, we encourage our facility colleagues to “click in” to the hearings if they cannot attend the hearings in person in Columbus, Ohio.   (Registration information).    During the hearings we will post some of the safety and sustainability concepts we have been advocating — either by presenting a new concept of our own or by supporting the concepts of other user-interests — on the site linked below:

Workspace for ICC 2018 Group A Hearings

The order in which the proposals will be heard appears on Page 979 of the Complete Monograph

We generally pay closer attention to proposals dealing with electrotechnology (power, telecommunications, signaling, #SmartCampus, etc.) because — as it should be clear from viewing the livestream — that building inspectors and fire safety professionals are comparatively well-funded.  Their role in upholding the safety of the built environment is understood by local and state agencies and their participation is built into public safety budget.  The IEEE Education & Healthcare Committee is following the trajectory of a number of proposals submitted to the ICC Group A technical committees and discusses them during its bi-weekly teleconferences.

Public comments on the results of the Spring Hearings are due on July 16th. The results of the Group A Hearings will be revisited during the Group A Public Comment Hearings, October 24-31, 2018 in Richmond Virginia.  See: Complete 2018 Group A Schedule

IEEE C2 | 2020 National Electrical Safety Code

With the balloting of the First Draft of the 2020 National Electrical Code (the NEC, a consensus document developed by the National Fire Protection Association) now completed, we turn our attention to the 2022 revision of the National Electrical Safety Code (te NESC, a consensus document developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers).*

We collaborate with the IEEE SCC-18 and the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee in developing safety and sustainability concepts unique to educational facilities — particularly the campuses of large research universities where the power systems are on the order of 25 to 250 connected MVA.    Power systems this large are unregulated by public service commissions because they are considered premises wiring by the NEC and considered to be on the customer side of the point of common coupling by investor-owned utilities who are.   Coupled with the NEC, the NESC sets the standard of care for all exterior campus power system design, construction and maintenance.

Public input is due July 16, 2018.   All IEEE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11:00 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.  The next teleconference of the E&H committee is scheduled for June 9th.  Anyone is welcomed to join either of the two teleconferences hosted bi-weekly during the business day of Europe (15:00 – 15:30) and the Americas (3:00 – 3:30 PM EDT) with the login information on the IEEE E&H website:  http://sites.ieee.org/icps-ehe/

Issue: [16-67]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Robert G. Arno, Lorne Clark, Nehad El-Sharif, Jim Harvey, Kane Howard, Joe Weber, Guiseppe Parise, Jim Murphy

Category: Electrical, Energy Conservation & Management, Occupational Safety

Walla Walla University

*The NFPA is an organization with fire safety as a primary consideration.  The IEEE is an organization with the safety and sustainability of electrotechnology as a primary consideration.  These are two different complementary but oftentimes competing cultures with respect to sustaining the business model of an accredited consensus standards developer.

NSF 49 | Biosafety Cabinetry

NSF International develops a consensus standard for one of the centerpiece safety technologies in educational facilities — NSF 49 Biosafety CabinetryThis Standard applies to Class II (laminar flow) biosafety cabinetry designed to minimize hazards inherent in work with agents assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3, or 4.  It also defines the tests that shall be passed by such cabinetry to meet this standard. NSF 49 includes basic requirements for the design, construction, and performance of biosafety cabinets that are intended to provide personnel, product, and environmental protection; reliable operation; durability and structural stability; cleanability; limitations on noise level; illumination; vibration; and motor/blower performance.   

Proposed changes to electrical system requirements for this technology are now open for public review:

ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 46

Comments are due July 15th.

The committee also meets face-to-face annually at NSF International Headquarters and will do so this week on June 21st, 8:00 AM to 2:30 PM at NSF’s headquarters in Ann Arbor.   Remote online attendance by observers is welcomed but must be cleared the NSF International committee administrator Allan Rose (arose@nsf.org).   Learn more HERE

Action in the NSF International suite of standards generally track on this page: (Click here).  The NSF International suite of standards are a standing item of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which are open to anyone.  Click here to log in.

Issue: [13-118]

Category: Risk Management, Occupational Health and Safety

Link to legacy workspace

University of Texas Medical Branch Biosafety Training Center

 

 


Posted May 20, 2018

The education industry provides one of the largest markets for biosafety cabinetry manufacturers — particularly large research universities, university-affiliated healthcare enterprises and K-12 science laboratories.   When new research square-footage is budgeted the effective cost of this equipment is often difficult to determine; not just in per-unit terms but the degree to which environmental air management systems are affected.

NSF International develops a consensus standard for this technology — NSF 49 Biosafety CabinetryThis Standard applies to Class II (laminar flow) biosafety cabinetry designed to minimize hazards inherent in work with agents assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3, or 4.  It also defines the tests that shall be passed by such cabinetry to meet this standard. NSF 49 includes basic requirements for the design, construction, and performance of biosafety cabinets that are intended to provide personnel, product, and environmental protection; reliable operation; durability and structural stability; cleanability; limitations on noise level; illumination; vibration; and motor/blower performance.   

Now comes a proposal for revising the requirements for electrical wiring documentation:  ANSI Standards Action Page 33

Comments are due May 27th.  The public may comment directly on the NSF Online Workspace and/or communicate directly with Allan Rose, (734) 827-3817, arose@nsf.org (with copy of comments to psa@ansi.org

Action in the NSF International suite of standards generally track on this page: (Click here).  The NSF International suite of standards are a standing item of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which are open to anyone.  Click here to log in.

Issue: [13-118]

Category: Risk Management, Occupational Health and Safety

Link to legacy workspace

 


February 28, 2018

Laboratory at University Leipzig (Institute of Chemistry) 1906

NSF 49 Biosafety Cabinetry applies to Class II (laminar flow) biosafety cabinetry designed to minimize hazards inherent in work with agents assigned to biosafety levels 1, 2, 3, or 4.  It also defines the tests that shall be passed by such cabinetry to meet this standard. NSF 49 includes basic requirements for the design, construction, and performance of biosafety cabinets that are intended to provide personnel, product, and environmental protection; reliable operation; durability and structural stability; cleanability; limitations on noise level; illumination; vibration; and motor/blower performance.   

NSF 49 is undergoing revisions that are relevant to the teaching and research enterprises in the education industry:

RE: Average inflow velocity.  The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 42.  Comments are due March 25, 2018.

RE: Inflow canopy velocity alarms.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 98Comments are due March 11, 2018.  

RE: Interlocking with building environmental air systems.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Page 22Comments are due February 11, 2018.  

RE: Cabinetry exhaust.   The redline (strike and bold) public review document is available at this link:  ANSI Standards Action Pages 38 – 40 Comments are due January 28, 2018.  

RE: Hood visibility criteria.   The strike and bold document for these revisions are accessible at this link: ANSI Standards Action Pages 35-36.  Comments are due January 14, 2018. 

The public may comment directly on the NSF Online Workspace. and/or communicate directly with Allan Rose, (734) 827-3817, arose@nsf.org (with copy of comments to psa@ansi.org

Action in the NSF International suite of standards generally track on this page: (Click here).  The NSF International suite of standards are a standing item of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, which are open to anyone.  Login information is available in the link below:

Contact

Issue: [13-118]

Category: Risk Management, Occupational Health and Safety

University of Calcutta

NECA 417 | Designing, Installing, Operating, and Maintaining Microgrids

Click on image for current information

The National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) is proposing a new standard — NECA 417 Recommended Practice for Designing, Installing, Operating, and Maintaining Microgrids.  The proposed standard applies to microgrids and provides recommended practices for their design, installation, commissioning, operation, and maintenance.   Public notification of this commenting opportunity filed with ANSI is available at the link below:

ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 7

Comments are due July 30th.  You may obtain an electronic copy from neis@necanet.org.  Send comments to Aga Golriz, (301) 215-4549, Aga.golriz@necanet.org.  Send a copy of your comments psa@ansi.org.

Additionally, we will refer this to the IEEE Education & Healthcare Committee for specific response.

 

ISEA Z358.1 | ANSI Standard for Emergency Shower & Eyewash Testing

We find emergency shower and eyewash safety and sustainability concepts tracking in the next revision of the International Plumbing Code.  A simple search on the word “eyewash” in the link below identifies the response of the ICC Group A plumbing technical committee to proposals to modify the requirements for location, operation and maintenance of this technology:

2018 Report of the Committee Action Hearings

As stated throughout this advocacy stream, in supporting the education industry “user-interest” #TotalCostofOwnership agenda do not object to the specific safety technology itself; we are simply advocating for more risk-informed criteria and site-specific performance guidelines.   Ahead of the next public announcement by the ISEA technical committee we will host an online teleconference to evaluate the International Plumbing Code proposals (now open for public review) for the application of this essential safety technology.

Anyone may join this teleconference — July 12th, 11:00 – 11:30 AM Eastern time — with the login information below:

Open Door Teleconference Login Information

 


Posted May 24, 2018

University of Delaware | Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory

We have been advocating for risk-informed applications of emergency shower and eyewash testing safety technologies since the 2014 revision of ISEA Z358.1 | ANSI Standard for Emergency Shower & Eyewash Testing (Click here).    Through indications received from many users in research enterprises in the education industry, the quantity overspecification and the fixed interval testing of this safety technology imposes a financial burden that prohibits scarce preventive maintenance resources from being allocated to other safety technologies where risk is higher.

We have not had much success in this advocacy project (begun ahead of the 2014 revision cycle) owing to the dominance of manufacturer, compliance and enforcement interests.  Admittedly, great deal of resistance to change originates in the rather well-funded compliance enterprises in research universities also.  As in many ANSI-accredited standards suites, the manufacturers — the organizations that support the trade association – write the standard to reduce their risk.  Only after the public standard is written is the user-interest — the stakeholder in university research enterprises in the best position to manage all dimensions of risk — allowed to vote.   The stakeholder we have in mind is the principal investigator who has received the research grant — not the university compliance officer.

The 2019 revision to ISEA Z358.1 is under development now and was on the agenda of ISEA’s Annual Executive Summit that took place May 6-8 in Arlington, Virginia.   It is noteworthy that laboratory safety technology is on the agenda of the International Code Council’s Group A Code Development Cycle.   One proposal for laboratory safety can be found on Page 10 (Item K322) of the link below:

Healthcare Proposals Group A I-2 11-29-2017 File 16-69 and 13-28

The proposal for inclusion into the International Fire Code (IFC) appears to expand the application of the safety technology.   Whatever concepts we have proposed in the past for  ISEA Z358.1 will have a new challenge in the next revision of the IFC.    Many research universities have enterprises that will be affected by this proposal.  Does over-testing of laboratory safety equipment make US research universities less competitive globally?

We welcome collaboration with all stakeholders on this proposal during our weekly Open Door teleconferences.   Anyone is welcomed to participate with the login information below:

Contact

 

Issue: [13-28] and [16-69]

Contact: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben, Mark Schaufele, Ron George


Hunter College Laboratory | Our position has been to specify more of these rather than more of them in laboratory building hallways.

ASHRAE 135 Addendum bj | Building Automation & Control Networks

Otterbein University

The American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE) released Addendum bj to ASHRAE 135 Building Automation & Control Networks.  The purpose of ASHRAE 135 is to define data communication services and protocols for computer equipment used for monitoring and control of HVAC&R and other building systems and to define, in addition, an abstract, object-oriented representation of information communicated between such equipment, thereby facilitating the application and use of digital control technology in buildings.

The proposed revisions in Addendum bj are focused on the following:

135-2016bj-1. Introduce BACnet Secure Connect Datalink Layer Option
135-2016bj-2. Introduce BACnet/SC in the Network Layer Specifications
135-2016bj-3. Add new Annex YY for the BACnet Secure Connect Datalink Layer Option
135-2016bj-4. Extend the Network Port Object Type for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-5. Add and Extend ASN.1 Types for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-6. New Error Codes for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-7. Interoperability Specification Extensions for BACnet/SC

 ASHRAE 135 development presents a solid example of an optimal firmware consensus process for the emergent #SmartCampus; in our view.   You may access the redline in the link below:

https://osr.ashrae.org/default.aspx

Comments are due July 16th.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts web page.   We will coordinate our comments with user stakeholders in the education industry during our standing Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the credential in this link: (Weekly Open Door Teleconference Login)

 

Issue: [17-230]

Category: #SmartCampus, Electrical, Telecommunications, Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: David Anderson, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben


From our archive on a related ASHRAE standard:

 


Posted February 12, 2018

The American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE) released its Fourth Public Review Draft of ASHRAE 135 Building Automation & Control Networks.  The purpose of ASHRAE 135 is to define data communication services and protocols for computer equipment used for monitoring and control of HVAC&R and other building systems and to define, in addition, an abstract, object-oriented representation of information communicated between such equipment, thereby facilitating the application and use of digital control technology in buildings.

The proposed revisions are focused on ways for BACnet devices to map analog values onto multiple Binary Value, Binary Output, or Binary Lighting Output objects.  A common use case is in lighting applications, where a level, identified by a numeric value, sets the appropriate values of multiple binary outputs (on or off). Support of this new object type is excluded from all data sharing BIBBs for life safety and access control.   You may access the redline in the link below:

https://osr.ashrae.org/default.aspx

Comments are due February 19th.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts web page.   We will coordinate our comments with user stakeholders in the education industry during our standing Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the credential in this link: (Weekly Open Door Teleconference Login)

 

Issue: [17-230]

Category: #SmartCampus, Electrical, Telecommunications, Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: David Anderson, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben

 

From our archive (related standard ASHRAE 13):

 

NIST | Federal Technology Transfer

NIST Solar Testbed

The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) are co-leading the Lab-to-Market Cross Agency Priority goal, part of the recently released President’s Management Agenda(link is external). To accelerate these efforts, NIST has launched an initiative to improve federal technology transfer.

The education industry – particularly large research universities — are likely stakeholders in this discussion  – which NIST will expand outside the policy-making precincts of Washington DC.   Standards Michigan collaborates with the American National Standards Institute on issues of this nature.

Comments are due July 30th.   Ahead of this deadline a series of meetings will be hosted by NIST — both online and on-site — from May 17 through May 31.   See the the first page of the Federal Register Notice [Docket Number: 180220199–819–01] for more information.

All NIST activity is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences; every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time which are open to everyone.  Click here to log in.

 

Issue: [18-122]

Category: US Department of Commerce, Public Policy

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Paul Green

Related posts:

NIST | Standards Curricula Program

National Technology Transfer & Advancement Act

History of the American National Standards Institute

Uniform Mechanical Code

The IAPMO Group has launched the 2021 revision cycle for the Uniform Mechanical Code; widely incorporated by reference into public safety law in many states.

BSR/IAPMO UMC 1-20xx, Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC). This code provides minimum standards to safeguard life or limb, health, property, and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance, or use of heating, ventilating, cooling, refrigeration systems, incinerators and other miscellaneous heat-producing appliances. The provisions of this code apply to the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, replacement, addition to, use, or maintenance of mechanical systems.

This document is developed so that its technical concepts correlate with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).  The UPC provides standards and requirements to safeguard life or limb, health, property and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance or use of plumbing systems. The provisions of this code apply to the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, addition to, use, or maintenance of plumbing systems.

Project Need: Designation of the UMC as an American National Standard has provided the built industry with uniform mechanical standards resulting in a reduction in training costs and product development costs, and in price reduction for consumers. This American National Standard provides consumers with safe mechanical systems while allowing latitude for innovation and new technologies. This project is intended to keep the code current.

Stakeholders: Manufacturers, users, installers and maintainers, labor research/standards/testing laboratories, enforcing authorities, consumers, and special experts. *

The Complete Monograph of proposed revisions for the 2021 Uniform Mechanical Code has been released and available for public review.

UMC 2018 Technical Committee Meeting Monograph

Comments are due January 3, 2019.   We encourage subject matter experts at the workpoint in the education facilities industry — i.e. tradespersons, foremen, supervisors that have a user-interest point of view (the stakeholder who is the final fiduciary)– to participate in the development of the next revision of the Uniform Mechanical Code.  As we explain in our ABOUT we find that standards developers routinely attempt to cultivate the user-interest.

More detailed information about how all stakeholders may participate is available this link: Public Comment Page.    You may communicate directly with IAPMO’s standards staff here: IAPMO (International Association of Plumbing & Mechanical Officials) 4755 E. Philadelphia Street Ontario, CA 91761 Office: (909) 472-4241 Gabriella Davis gaby.davis@iapmo.org

University of Richmond

Since 2012 we have been tracking several IAPMO documents which govern the safety and sustainability concepts in education facilities; among them:

Uniform Solar Energy and Hydronics Code [Issue 15-15]

Cross-Connection Control Professional Qualifications Standard [13-75]

Uniform Swimming Pool Code [Issue 13-14]

Aluminum and copper plumbing fixtures [Issue 12-99]

 

Issue: [17-299]


 

 

 

 

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