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INCITS | Information Technology

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INCITS | Information Technology

May 25, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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The International Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS) — an ANSI accredited standards developing organization — is the forum of choice for information technology developers, producers and users for the creation and maintenance of formal de jure IT standards.   The INCITS mission is to promote the effective use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) through standardization in a way that balances the interests of all stakeholders and increases the global competitiveness of the member organizations.   

The INCITS Executive Board serves as the consensus body with oversight of 40+ Technical Committees. Additionally, the INCITS Executive Board has the international leadership role as ANSI’s US Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information Technology with Standards Australia as the Global Secretariat.

Information and communication technology is a fast-moving, highly networked, global industry.  The United States ICT community — with the education industry a key stakeholder — may be served best with identical, whole cloth adoption of relevant ISO/IEC standards coordinated between the ISO and the IEC through Joint Technical Committee 1.  In many ways, the reliance upon joint ISO/IEC standards may have as transformative an effect upon the management of ICT as the ISO-9000 suite of standards had upon development and management of the global automobile industry.

In last week’s ANSI Standards Action (Pages 7-9) INCITS has opened its proposed re-accreditation of several (previously adopted) ISO/IEC ICT management standards to US stakeholders.

INCITS/ISO/IEC 20000-3, Information technology – Service management – Part 3: Guidance on scope definition and applicability of
ISO/IEC 20000-1

INCITS/ISO/IEC 30105-1, Information technology – IT Enabled Services-Business Process Outsourcing (ITES-BPO) lifecycle processes –
Part 1: Process reference model (PRM)

INCITS/ISO/IEC 30105-2, Information Technology – IT Enabled Services-Business Process Outsourcing (ITES-BPO) lifecycle processes –
Part 2: Process Assessment Model (PAM)

INCITS/ISO/IEC 30105-3, Information Technology – IT Enabled Services-Business Process Outsourcing (ITES-BPO) lifecycle processes –
Part 3: Measurement Framework (MF) and Organization Maturity Model (OMM)

INCITS/ISO/IEC 30105-4, Information Technology – IT Enabled Services-Business Process Outsourcing (ITES-BPO) Lifecycle Processes –
Part 4: Terms and Concepts

INCITS/ISO/IEC 30105, Information Technology – IT Enabled Services-Business Process Outsourcing (ITES-BPO) Lifecycle Processes –
Part 5: Guidelines

Comments are due July 3rd.  We encourage subject matter experts on the business side of the education industry to participate and comment.  To do so you will likely need to purchase the documents themselves; though special arrangements may be possible by collaborating directly with INCITS staff.  (Click here for the INCITS standards landing page).  Electronic copies are available from the ANSI webstore.   You may send your comments to comments@standards  (with copy to psa@ansi.org)

All ICT standards are on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences, every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.   Anyone is welcome to join by clicking here.  We also collaborate relatively closely with the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee and IEEE SCC-18.

Issue: [12-77]

Category: Telecommunications, #SmartCampus, Administration & Management, International

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey

 

USNC/IEC | Call for Experts

May 25, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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Click on image

It is difficult finding subject matter experts within the education industry — both on the academic and business side — to help develop and advocate user-interest position in global electrotechnology standards.  Academics respond to funding opportunities; either from the government or from incumbent, competitor stakeholders in the global standards system.   The business side of the education industry is unable to bear the complexity and expense of supporting an expert over a long enough period of time where that voice is effective in advocating safer, simpler, lower-cost and longer-lasting campuses.  As we explain in our ABOUT, effectiveness requires the sensitivity of education industry leadership to long and deep cycle undertakings — and a willingness to accept that results are subtle and oftentimes politically invisible in prospect.  In retrospect, however; the stream of subtle changes accumulate into techtonic movement in technology and economics which benefits both sides of the education industry.

Nevertheless, we continue to try; and pass on to our rapidly growing cadre of website visitors, calls for new committee members.

The US National Committee to the International Electrotechnical Commission (USNA/IEC) has recently sent out a Call for Members in this week’s ANSI Standards Action Page 42.  Subject matter experts are needed for the following committees:

US Coordinating Committee on IEC ACSEC Information Security and Data Privacy

US Coordinating Committee on IEC ACEE Energy Efficiency

US Coordinating Committee on IEC ACTAD Electricity Transmission and Distribution

If education industry subject matter experts are interested in participating in any of these groups, please contact Kendall Szulewski-Francis, USNC Program Administrator, at ksfrancis@ansi.org.   We note that all IEC standards on the standing of our own weekly Open Door teleconference every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.   (Click here to log in)

Also, insofar as electrotechnology in the education facilities is concerned, the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (IEEE E&H) — as a group with American and European members — also follows IEC standards according to the requirements of the various national committees administered by CEN/CENELEC.   The IEEE E&H Committee meets online twice this coming Tuesday, May 22nd.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Electrical, Telecommunications, Information Communications & Technology, #SmartCampus, International

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Giuseppe Parise



Related links:

USNC Current Newsletter: Latest Issue Focuses on IEC Communications and Cultivating International Relationships

IEC SyC Smart Grid & Smart Energy Standards

IEC TC 85 | Electrical safety in low voltage distribution systems up to 1 000 V

 

ASHRAE 62.1 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — which specifies minimum ventilation rates and other measures for new and existing buildings that are intended to provide indoor air quality that is acceptable to human occupants and that minimizes adverse health effects.  Recently released Addendum i contains significant changes to the scope of this document which are now open for public review and can be accessed  on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)

Comments are due May 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 and any other of its consensus documents.   The ASHRAE suite is a swiftly moving suite which effectively sets the standard of care for environmental air systems in education and healthcare facilities.  Many of its committees meet twice a year at various locations around the US; the next Annual conference to be hosted in Houston, June 23-27.   We encourage workpoint subject matter experts in the Houston area — i.e. design, construction and O&M tradespersons working in education and healthcare campus HVAC shops — to attend this conference and sit in on the meetings of ASHRAE 62.1 (or any other technical committee) to observe how leading practice is discovered.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


April 21, 2018

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  These can be found on Pages 36 through 83 of ANSI Standards Action or at ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)   The changes are non-trivial; a sample of three of them summarized below:

Addendum g: HVAC requirements for minimally occupied spaces

Addendum h:  The standard may be applied to both new and existing buildings but its provisions are not primarily intended to be applied retroactively when the standard is used as a mandatory regulation or code.

Addendum z: Tabulation of requisite ventilation required at the outdoor air intake for many systems.

There are 15 more changes in the batch most recently released.  These specifics will find their way into construction documents and commissioning agreements and operations and maintenance budgets.

Comments are due April 22nd.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to our ASHRAE 62.1 Workspace

 


September 5, 2017

University of Michigan Ross School of Business

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1b-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum responds to increasing requests for more simplified table for ventilation rate procedure of the standard. It contains a simplified ventilation rate table in Informative Appendix D for use in existing buildings where information for calculating minimum ventilation using Normative Appendix A for multiple spaces is often unavailable.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1d-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum deletes Informative Appendix D (Rationale for Minimum Physiological Requirements for Respiration Air Based on CO2 Concentration). Appendix D first appeared in 62-1989. Its purpose was to explain the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide in spaces. It is based on data from the 1950’s. Newer information is available. The committee is aware of misuse and confusion caused by the information in its present form and prefers to delete this misused appendix now. The committee may add back relevant informative guidance that assists with implementation of the standard in the next version of the standard.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1f-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) The so-called “Multiple Spaces Equation” is very difficult to use, especially for variable volume systems for which there are an infinite number of scenarios with varying airflow, occupancy, supply air temperature, etc., all of which affect system ventilation efficiency. 62.1 includes two options for calculating system ventilation efficiency, a prescriptive approach using Table 6.2.5.2 and a more fundamental approach in Normative Appendix A. This proposed addendum replaces the table approach with two formulas, one used to determine system ventilation efficiency (Ev) and one used to determine minimum primary airflow setpoint intended to be used for VAV systems.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2i-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would make explicit that placing a new fan in a kitchen or bathroom in an existing dwelling unit can address the airflow deficit that would otherwise have existed through Section A3. This has been assumed to be true, but has not previously been made explicit. This proposed change would make this condition more transparent to users.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2j-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would explicitly allow existing buildings to use a branch-circuit overcurrent device as an override even if it is not dedicated to only the ventilation fan in recognition that running a new circuit for the fan in an existing home is not always feasible.

Comments are due October 8th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

IAPMO | Uniform Solar, Hydronics and Geothermal Code

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Cornell University Roosevelt Island Geothermal Campus (Click on image)

The IAPMO Group has entered the final developmental stage of the 2018 revision of IAPMO USHGC 1 Uniform Solar, Hydronics and Geothermal Code.  This standard applies to the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, replacement, addition to, use, or maintenance of solar energy, geothermal and hydronic systems including but not limited to equipment and appliances intended for space heating or cooling; water heating; swimming pool heating or process heating; and snow and ice melt systems.    The Report on Comments — 477 pages — can be accessed by clicking here.

Written petitions to the IAPMO Executive Committee are due May 21st.   You may obtain an electronic copy from Hugo Aguilar, Hugo.aguilar@iapmo.org.  Send your comments to Hugo (with copy to psa@ansi.org).

More detailed information about how users may participate more broadly — either as a technical committee member or with a proposal for better idea across the entire IAPMO suite — by communicating directly with IAPMO’s standards staff: IAPMO (International Association of Plumbing & Mechanical Officials) 4755 E. Philadelphia Street Ontario, CA 91761 Office: (909) 472-4241 Gabriella Davis gaby.davis@iapmo.org

Issue: [16-125] and [15-15]

Category: Water, Energy

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel, Ron George

Link to ANSI Announcement

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IES | Compact Fluorescent Lamps

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The Illumination Engineering Society (IES) is one of the first names in non-profit trade associations whose consensus documents are heavily referenced in the specifications of building construction projects for the US education industry.

We are following developments in a few technical committees put together by the IES who set the standard of care for illumination technologies by coordinating our understanding of the scopes and purposes of other consensus documents developed by:

There are a number of other trade associations that are participants in research and open source standards for faster moving parts of the illumination science.  We will cover these in future posts.

For the moment IES has released an addendum to Section 4.2.2.3 Compact Fluorescent Lamps) for public review:

ANSI Standards Action Page 42

Comments are due June 3, 2018.   You are encouraged to send comments directly to IES (with copy to psa@ansi.org) c/o pmcgillicuddy@ies.org.   Application information to participate in the IES process is available at this link:  https://www.ies.org/standards/technical-committees/  

IES consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference (every Wednesday,  11:00 AM Eastern) which is open to everyone with the login information below:

Contact

Issue: [15-236]

Category: Electrical, #SmartCampus

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey, Kane Howard

 

 

 

 

 

ANSI Standards Action Page 42

ISO/TC 267 Facility Management

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Click on image

The original University of Michigan regulatory advocacy enterprise was catalyst for persuading selected institutions, subject matter experts and education industry trade associations to participate in international codes and standards development (See ABOUT).  With a spend running at about $300 billion the education facilities industry ought to be at the meetings where the standard of care was being discovered and promulgated.

In 2010 the need was especially acute in the square footage devoted to research; where a trend toward offshoring research — and a significant revenue source for large research universities — was gathering pace.  Two years earlier that enterprise had already commented on the scope of the ISO/TC 276 Biotechnology committee (administered by the Deutsches Institut für Normung)  to remove the facility component in the committee scope.  Taking facility management out of a biotechnology standard was important because research square footage is expensive.  Not all nations — and local safety enforcement authorities — have the same safety regulations that provides a level playing field for competitive market participants in biotechnology research.   (See: ISO 276 Biotechnology).

University of Glasgow

In 2010 a new committee was formed — ISO/TC 267 Facility management — led by the BSI Group, and an internationally oriented subject matter experts from many countries who had extensive experience in designing, building, operating and maintaining the built environment for private industry.  Why not convey the perspective and lessons learned from the private sector into the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States (see our monthly US Census Bureau coverage)?    Collaboration with ANSI and the prospective US Technical Advisory Group administrator – the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) — was the first step.

This month, ISO  TC 267 has released several new work products; one of which is noteworthy for its prospect of providing discipline to the facility management profession in the US education facilities industry:

Facility management — Management systems — Requirements with guidance for use

From the document prospectus:

ISO 41001:2018 specifies the requirements for a facility management (FM) system when an organization:

a) needs to demonstrate effective and efficient delivery of FM that supports the objectives of the demand organization;

b) aims to consistently meet the needs of interested parties and applicable requirements;

c) aims to be sustainable in a globally-competitive environment.

The requirements specified in ISO 41001:2018 are non-sector specific and intended to be applicable to all organizations, or parts thereof, whether public or private sector, and regardless of the type, size and nature of the organization or geographical location. 

 Click here for the ISO announcement.  Click here for link to the IFMA announcement



All international standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to Click Here to login and help prepare user-interest comments on documents open to public review:

Issue: [11-33]

Category: Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

Link to legacy workspace 

ISO Focus January 2015 Anthony-Robben – Education Enterprise pp 33-37

ISO/TC 267 Project Kickoff Meeting | Berlin 2012

*With all due respect to all the world’s standards developers: One must be mindful of the claim that “academia is involved”.  In nearly all cases, academic faculty are aligned more closely with the Producer and General Interest stakeholder category rather than the User.  In other words, many academic faculty (as subject matter experts with Ph.D’s) are funded by manufacturers, insurers, labor and the conformity/compliance interest — the stakeholders who are, by design, opposed to the user interest.  Most standards developers struggle to recruit and retain pure user interests — whom we call the final fiduciary — on their technical committees.   As we explain in ABOUT, the fault does not lie with the standards developer — the fault lies with the education industry itself; the parabolic rise in the cost of education in the US being the proof. 

 

 

 

 

IEEE I&CPS Color Book Update

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

“View of Malakoff Hauts de Seine” | Henri Rousseau, 1903

For over 50 years the IEEE Color Books have set the standard of care for electrical power system design, construction, operation and maintenance.  Reference to the Color Books usually show up in contracts that assert: “Conform to all applicable IEEE standards“.

While the Color Books are not written in the transitive language required of a “code” that can be incorporated by reference into public safety legislation[1] ; the Color Book committees have traditionally provided the most authoritative technical foundation for documents for the NFPA family of electrical safety documents.   The Color Books continue to be referenced into the National Electrical Code, for example; though that has been changing [2]; and the rate of that change will gather pace.  Competition from other trade associations that want to claim ownership of the regulatory landscape for the emergent #SmartCampus will make it so.

The IEEE committees are populated largely by electrical professionals; the NFPA committees are populated by a balance of subject matter experts  largely informed by the fire safety culture.  The leadership of electrical safety in the United States a fire safety organization is unique in the world.  In other nations that adopt derivatives of Technical Committee 64 of the International Electrical Code Commission the subject matter experts are largely electrical industry professionals.  The regulatory product of TC 64 is the IEC 60364 series of interdependent electrical safety documents are developed in relatively small, swiftly-moving modules and are referenced in Article 90 of the National Electrical Code.  This is important because IEEE — the largest professional association in the world — has been migrating toward the more global IEC standards development model which features a constellation of interdependent modules.

Now comes another in a series of formal announcements by the IEEE Standards Association that another legacy Color Book will be allowed to lapse so that it can be superceded by its replacement in the 3000-suite[3].

(Green Book) ANSI/IEEE 142-2007, Recommended Practice for Grounding of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems [4]

(Gold Book) ANSI/IEEE 493-2007, Recommended Practice for the Design of Reliable Industrial and Commercial Power Systems [5]

IEEE Standards association formally announced it in this week’s ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 13.  Note that several other Color Books — notably the White Book ANSI/IEEE 602-2007, Recommended Practice for Electric Systems in Health Care Facilities — will also be allowed to lapse.

This means that design, construction, operations and maintenance documents that reference them as the standard of care will require an update. 

While all IEEE standards are on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference every Wednesday, 11 AM EST, we typically refer issues of this nature to the IEEE Education and Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times monthly in both European and American time zones.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Electrical, Telecommunications, Facility Asset Management, #SmartCampus, Public Safety

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Robert G. Arno,  Neal Dowling,  Gary Fox, Karen Evangelista, Jim Harvey, Andrew Hernandez, Christel Hunter, Daleep Mohla, Sergio Panetta, Dev Paul, Robert Schuerger, Joe Weber


[1] The requirement to be a “code” carries specific requirements for public access which places a financial responsibility upon the consensus document developers.   ANSI accredited standards developers are accredited with consideration for conformity to ANSI due processes.  The accreditation applies to their entire family of documents; however not all documents qualify as an ANSI accredited document that can be referenced into public safety law.

[2] See: IEEE IAS Color Book Update by David Mills 2008

[3] Coordinating the development cycles of the IEEE 3000-series recommended practices with the NFPA 70 series-documents

[4] This document is heavily referenced in telecommunication, information and computer technology standards

[5] This document is referenced in Article 700 of the National Electrical Code, establishing formal reliability concepts for emergency power systems.

[6] European electrical safety concepts evolved around shock hazard because, a) user exposure to a higher outlet utilization voltage of 220-240V and b) recognition of the diverse configuration European utilization outlets owing to the diversity of national electrical equipment markets.


NFPA 3000 | Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The School of Athens

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is swiftly preparing a timely regulatory product — NFPA 3000 Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events — in response to the rise in active shooter incidents and the escalating impact of hostile events in all industries.   Many of these incidents occur in educational settings; hence our interest in promoting the participation of subject matter experts, individual school districts, colleges and universities and the many non-profit trade associations that service the education industry. 

Principal and Alternate Votes on the NFPA Technical Committee from educational institutions: Harvard School of Public Health,  Auburn University,  Missouri State University, University of Connecticut and Vanderbilt University  

This document will likely establish the standard of care for the prevention and management of these incidents.  It will provide the minimum criteria for the level of competence required for responders organizing, managing, and sustaining an active shooter and/or hostile event preparedness and response program based on the authority having jurisdiction’s (AHJ) function and assessed level of risk.  From the public announcement: (ANSI Standards Action January 12, 2018, Page 4):  

….[This consensus body] has been assembled in response to recent active shooter and hostile events of increasing magnitude occurring globally, which are resulting in tragic loss of life, as well as countless injuries. The very nature of these unpredictable, deadly events and the frequency of recurrence establishes the need for prompt dissemination of standards for preparedness and response. Moreover, the Council found that the urgency in addressing these serious safety concerns warranted the initiation of expedited standards development procedures.   The standard is being developed to address preparedness, planning, and response to cross-functional, multi-discipline, and cross-coordinated emergency events that are not already established by the NFPA. This includes provisions that establish criteria for the professional qualifications of those who are responsible for preparation, planning, exercising, and responding to cross-functional, cross-jurisdictional events. The standard is being processed as a Provisional Standard to ensure the prompt dissemination of new safety criteria….

The project’s prospectus is available at this link: NFPA Fact Sheet

An exposure draft was posted for public comment at this link: Public Input NFPA 3000    Standards Michigan submitted original public comment (click here).  The First Draft Report is now available at this link:  NFPA 3000 Next Edition.

Comments are due August 1st.

For more information about this document please feel free to contact Jenny Depew, Project Administrator at 617-984-7505 or jdepew@nfpa.org.

Standards Michigan will be monitoring the participation of individuals,  school districts, higher education institutions as well as many of the education industry trade associations whose members may be stakeholders in this NFPA product.   We will place NFPA 3000 along with all the other NFPA documents we follow on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone may join these teleconferences with login information in this link: (Open Door Login).

Issue [18-15]

Category: Public Safety, Risk Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben

 

ASTM International | Office Facility Management

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The ASTM Subcommittee E06.25 on Whole Buildings and Facilities — founded in 1946 — will meet again Sunday October 21 through Wednesday October 24 at the  in Washington, Hilton; Washington DC.  The event will coincide with a symposium on Building Science and the Physics of Building Enclosure Performance co-sponsored with the ASTM Committee D08 on Roofing and Waterproofing.   The symposium will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on current research regarding building science and the physics of building enclosure and whole building performance, with an emphasis on transitions between the horizontal and the vertical and the critical points of intersection; testing and assessment of heat, air, and moisture transfer; energy use, and the environment.

While papers for the upcoming symposia have already been submitted. information about the topics for the 2019 conference may be obtained from Symposium Chairman Dan Lemieux, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc, Fairfax, VA, USA, Email: dlemieux@wje.com, tel: +1 703-641-4601; or Symposium Co-Chair Jennifer Keegan, ATI/ Intertek, Blue Bell, PA, USA, Email: Jennifer.keegan@intertek.com, Tel: +1 215-554-4648.

The entire ASTM suite is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door Teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time — which are open to the public.  (Click here for login credentials)

Issue: [18-37]

Category: Architectural, Space Planning, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

 


March 1, 2018

University of Central Missouri

There are many non-profit trade associations engaged in developing consensus documents that set the standard of care for the built environment.   These documents are frequently referenced in design, construction and facility management contracts.  Given the large proportion of office space in higher education — by some accounts up to half of all square footage in colleges and universities is office space and classified as “commercial” in building codes — the ASTM International (ASTM) suite of standards may be of interest to  subject matter experts, education industry trade associations and other stakeholders that seek to lower #TotalCostofOwnership by using benchmarking tools for comparative performance.   The titles of documents now open for public review are listed below:

ASTM E1661-1995A (R201x), Classification for Serviceability of an Office Facility for Meetings and Group Effectiveness

ASTM E1662-1995A (R201x), Classification for Serviceability of an Office Facility for Sound and Visual Environment

ASTM E1664-1995A (R201x), Classification for Serviceability of an ASTOffice Facility for Layout and Building Factors

ASTM E1665-1995A (R201x), Classification for Serviceability of an Office Facility for Facility Protection

ASTM E1666-1995A (R201x), Classification for Serviceability of an Office Facility for Work Outside Normal Hours or Conditions

Each Facility Rating Scale in these classifications provides a means to estimate the level of serviceability of a building or facility for one topic of serviceability and to compare that level against the level of any other building or facility.   This classification can be used for comparing how well different buildings or facilities meet a particular requirement for serviceability. It is applicable despite differences such as location, structure, mechanical systems, age, and building shape.  This classification can be used to estimate the amount of variance of serviceability from target or from the requirement, for a single office facility, or within a group of office facilities.   More complete information with essential graphical diagrams is available at this link:  ASTM Subcommittee E06.25 on Whole Buildings and Facilities

Comments are due March 19th.   You may obtain an electronic copy for commenting purposes from Corice Leonard at ASTM International, (610) 832-9744, accreditation@astm.org.   Send comments directly to her with copy to psa@ansi.org.  The entire ASTM suite is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door Teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time — which are open to the public.  (Click here for login credentials)

 

Issue: [18-37]

Category: Architectural, Space Planning, Facility Asset Management

 

The New School University Center | New York City

Link to original ANSI Standards Action announcement: (Pages 3-4)

 

 

ICC | Group A School Security Concepts

May 24, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

“The Country School” | Winslow Homer

A number of candidate code changes regarding ingress and egress paths in education facilities were debated during last week’s International Code Council Spring Committee Action Hearings in Columbus, Ohio.  These have been identified in our previous post and are identified below.  Search the Complete Monograph to see the proposal detail.

IBC Proposal E49-18 | New definition of “Control Vestibule”

IBC Proposal E48-18 | Locking arrangements in educational occupancies (PDF Page 141)

IFC F37-18 | Fire safety, evacuation and lockdown plans | (PDF Page 1086)

IFC F38-18 | Exterior door numbering | (Page 1087)

Keep in mind that the placement of educational facility safety concepts –whether a concept belongs in the fire code or the building code or both — is an ongoing debate among building safety professionals generally.

The public will have an opportunity to respond to the formal balloting on Committee Actions when the transcript is released on May 30th.

Comments are due July 16th.  Additionally, public comment is possible at the Fall Committee Action Hearings.   The results of the Group A Hearings will be revisited during the Group A Public Comment Hearings, October 24-31, 2018 in Richmond Virginia.  See: Complete 2018 Group A Schedule.

We keep the entire ICC suite on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door Teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Click here to log in.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Architectural, Facility Asset Management, Space Planning

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

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