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Rainwater Catchment Systems

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Rainwater Catchment Systems

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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Duke University West Campus Water Reclamation Pond | Click on image

One of several consensus documents asserting leading practice for rainwater catchment systems — an emergent design feature many college and university facility departments are signaling to demonstrate their conformity to the campus sustainability zietgeist — has entered a new revision cycle:  ASPE 63 Rainwater Catchment Systems; developed and published by the American Society of Plumbing Engineers.  From the project prospectus:

Scope: This standard covers requirements for the design and installation of rainwater catchment systems that utilize the principle of collecting and using precipitation from a rooftop and other hard, impervious building surfaces. This standard does not apply to the collection of rainwater from vehicular parking or other similar surfaces.

Project Need: The purpose of this standard is to assist engineers, designers, plumbers, builders/developers, local government, and end-users in safely implementing a rainwater catchment system.

Stakeholders: Plumbing engineers, designers, plumbers, builders/developers, local government, end users.

Because this is just an announcement of a new revision, and there is no document to review other than the current 2013 draft, there are no comments due yet.   You may obtain a copy of the 2013 edition by contacting Gretchen Pienta, (847) 296-0002, gpienta@aspe.org,  6400 Shafer Court, Suite 350, Rosemont, IL 60018.   ASPE will announce the start of the public commenting period which will cover here.

We have all water system codes and standards on the agenda of our next monthly Mechanical Engineering teleconference — next week on July 24th, 11 AM EST — during which time we will sort through the several consensus documents setting the standard of care for this technology.  We count five competitors in this space.   We place special attention to the consensus documents that show up in design guidelines, construction contracts and public water safety compliance checklists.   Login information is available in the link below:

Mechanical Engineering Codes & Standards

Issue: [13-61]

Category: Mechanical Engineering, Water

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

University of Toledo

Sustainable cities and communities

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The United States Technical Advisory Group (US-TAG), with oversight by the American National Standards Institute and administration by NFPA International, are participating in the development of an International Organization for Standardization consensus document that will shape policy development for smart cities (sustainable cities and communities).  As cities-within-cities, major international research universities are stakeholders in these discussions because of the town-gown infrastructure interface in the emergent #SmarCampus.  We have been participants in this project since 2014.

Consensus documents emerging from ISO/TC 268 tend to be large and fast-moving as new workgroups are spawned from the core committees.  Click here for the Business Plan.

CLICK ON IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Owing to copyright restrictions upon ISO consensus documents we are unable to reproduce draft documents in their entirety beyond the balloting periods.  We limit our use of these documents to collaborations with subject matter experts in knowledge of, and concern for, the user-interest in the US education industry (See ABOUT) .  We are happy to review these documents during our weekly Open Door teleconference which takes place online every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  (Click here for login information).   You may also communicate directly with Robert Solomon (rsolomon@nfpa.org) and/or Linda MacKay (lmackay@nfpa.org) at NFPA International, the US TAG Administrator for this project.

 

July 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  US TAG will meet in at NFPA headquarters, September 12-13, 2018

June 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  The US TAG is planning a September on-site meeting at NFPA Headquarters in Boston.

May 2018 Update:

Balloting was completed by the US TAG on proposed ISO/FDIS 37120 Sustainable Development in Communities – Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life

April 2018 Update:

At the 2017 Paris meeting of TC/268, the UK suggested that it would be helpful to develop an overall maturity model for cities, drawing on the framework set out by SC1 in ISO/DIS 37153. The TC agreed, and WG4 was asked to work up proposals.

At its Berlin meeting in May, WG4 made good progress and recommended a way forward. But in plenary discussion with other working groups, there was concern that WG4 was moving too quickly and on too narrowly‐focused a basis

The purpose of a recent release by ISO TC/268 — an outline of city “maturity models” — is to respond to those concerns, proposing a broader framework for future work in this area across TC/268

ISO TC 268 City Maturity Model Presentation

An explanation of the broad contours of parent standard — with the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR Groupas the Secretariat — is described in the videoclip below:

Issue: [14-101] and [18-5]

Category: #SmartCampus, Informatics, Administration & Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

 

Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Western Wyoming Community College

The ASHRAE committee writing standards for ventilation and indoor air quality has released two batches of redlines for public review.  These changes are important because they are referenced into ASHRAE 90.1 — Energy Standard for Buildings — and ASHRAE 90.1 is referenced into the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).  The IECC is incorporated by reference into federal and state energy laws.

Addendum ad.  Proposed changes to Table 6.5 that lists minimum exhaust rates for certain spaces in which contaminants generation have been deemed high enough that it contaminant cannot be diluted and thus need to be exhausted.  However, the standard does not require these spaces to be at any pressure. This proposed addendum adds the
requirement for these spaces to be at a negative pressure with respect to adjacent spaces in order to minimize contaminants leakage to adjacent spaces.  Exceptions are granted to the local Evironmental Health and Safety professional responsible to the owner or to the owner’s designee.

Addendum x.   Prescriptive compliance paths for laboratories, parking garages and toilet exhaust air.  The exhaust procedure in Standard 62.1-2016 contains requirements in notes. This proposed addendum relocates those requirements to the body of the standard. The performance compliance path is modified to be consistent with the proposed changes to the indoor ari quality program in Addendum aa to 62.1-2016. Table 6.5.2 is added as relocated from Section 5

Comments are due August 12th.

Addendum aa. The indoor air quality procedure has a long history going back to the 1981 standard. Weaknesses in the requirements for identifying the contaminants
of concern, identifying concentration limits and exposure periods, and specifying the percentage of building occupants to be satisfied with perceived IAQ. Although the percentage of building occupants to be satisfied with perceived IAQ may be specified, and the standard requires that it be measured; this measurement usually would take place after occupancy so is often ignored or omitted. This proposed addendum adds requirements for designing to specific targets. The target design compounds and mixtures are specifically identified.

Addendum ab. Indoor CO2 has had a prominent place in discussions of ventilation and IAQ for many years. The relevant issues include the impacts of CO2 on building occupants, the use of CO2 to control outdoor air ventilation rates, CO2 monitoring as an indicator of general IAQ conditions and the use of indoor CO2 to estimate building ventilation rates. This proposed addendum adds a new Normative Appendix D, Estimation of Steady-State Indoor CO2 Concentrations Based on Per Person Ventilation Rates and Occupant Characteristics. The purpose is to describe the estimation of steady-state indoor carbon dioxide concentrations for a given per-person outdoor air ventilation rate.

Addendum ac.  Informative Appendix C (Summary of Selected Air Quality Guidelines) in 62.1-2016 was deleted in a previous addendum. This proposed addendum
adds a new Informative Appendix C with content supportive of changes to the Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP).

Comments are due August 27th.

Both batches of redlines are accessible on on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review.   We encourage our colleagues to comment.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Agenda teleconference.  CLICK HERE to log in.   Additionally, we host an monthly online teleconference for building industry professionals in the mechanical engineering discipline that are active in the education facility market.  It should be obvious that we have mastered the stream of technical standards that determine #TotalCostofOwnership in education facilities.  The next teleconference is on July 24th, 11 AM Eastern time.

Mechanical Engineering Codes & Standards

Feel free to log in.

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


Posted May 24, 2018

Beloit College

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — which specifies minimum ventilation rates and other measures for new and existing buildings that are intended to provide indoor air quality that is acceptable to human occupants and that minimizes adverse health effects.  Recently released Addendum i contains significant changes to the scope of this document which are now open for public review and can be accessed  on ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)

Comments are due May 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 and any other of its consensus documents.   The ASHRAE suite is a swiftly moving suite which effectively sets the standard of care for environmental air systems in education and healthcare facilities.  Many of its committees meet twice a year at various locations around the US; the next Annual conference to be hosted in Houston, June 23-27.   We encourage workpoint subject matter experts in the Houston area — i.e. design, construction and O&M tradespersons working in education and healthcare campus HVAC shops — to attend this conference and sit in on the meetings of ASHRAE 62.1 (or any other technical committee) to observe how leading practice is discovered.

All ASHRAE consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

 


April 21, 2018

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  These can be found on Pages 36 through 83 of ANSI Standards Action or at ASHRAE’s Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here)   The changes are non-trivial; a sample of three of them summarized below:

Addendum g: HVAC requirements for minimally occupied spaces

Addendum h:  The standard may be applied to both new and existing buildings but its provisions are not primarily intended to be applied retroactively when the standard is used as a mandatory regulation or code.

Addendum z: Tabulation of requisite ventilation required at the outdoor air intake for many systems.

There are 15 more changes in the batch most recently released.  These specifics will find their way into construction documents and commissioning agreements and operations and maintenance budgets.

Comments are due April 22nd.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

Issue: [12-21]

Category Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to our ASHRAE 62.1 Workspace

 


September 5, 2017

University of Michigan Ross School of Business

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard — ASHRAE 62 | Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality — several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1b-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum responds to increasing requests for more simplified table for ventilation rate procedure of the standard. It contains a simplified ventilation rate table in Informative Appendix D for use in existing buildings where information for calculating minimum ventilation using Normative Appendix A for multiple spaces is often unavailable.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1d-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) This proposed addendum deletes Informative Appendix D (Rationale for Minimum Physiological Requirements for Respiration Air Based on CO2 Concentration). Appendix D first appeared in 62-1989. Its purpose was to explain the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide in spaces. It is based on data from the 1950’s. Newer information is available. The committee is aware of misuse and confusion caused by the information in its present form and prefers to delete this misused appendix now. The committee may add back relevant informative guidance that assists with implementation of the standard in the next version of the standard.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.1f-201x, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016) The so-called “Multiple Spaces Equation” is very difficult to use, especially for variable volume systems for which there are an infinite number of scenarios with varying airflow, occupancy, supply air temperature, etc., all of which affect system ventilation efficiency. 62.1 includes two options for calculating system ventilation efficiency, a prescriptive approach using Table 6.2.5.2 and a more fundamental approach in Normative Appendix A. This proposed addendum replaces the table approach with two formulas, one used to determine system ventilation efficiency (Ev) and one used to determine minimum primary airflow setpoint intended to be used for VAV systems.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2i-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would make explicit that placing a new fan in a kitchen or bathroom in an existing dwelling unit can address the airflow deficit that would otherwise have existed through Section A3. This has been assumed to be true, but has not previously been made explicit. This proposed change would make this condition more transparent to users.

BSR/ASHRAE Addendum 62.2j-201x, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Residential Buildings (addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2 -2016) This proposed addendum would explicitly allow existing buildings to use a branch-circuit overcurrent device as an override even if it is not dedicated to only the ventilation fan in recognition that running a new circuit for the fan in an existing home is not always feasible.

Comments are due October 8th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 62.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

Sustainability Criteria for Professional Services

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“In the Sierras. /Lake Tahoe” | Albert Bierstadt, 1868 | Harvard University Art Museum

NSF International has released for public review a proposal for a new American national standard titled NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services.  From the project prospectus:

The Standard is one of the first to focus on the service industry subsectors described as “professional services”. Professional service firms are often characterized as those that have low capital intensity, high knowledge intensity, and a professionalized workforce. This Standard is applicable to the professional service subsectors identified in GSA’s Professional Services Schedule (“PSS”). These services include: Financial and Business Solutions; Advertising and Integrated Marketing Services; Language Services; Professional Engineering Services; Mission-Oriented Business Integrated Services; Worldwide Logistics Services; Environmental Services; and Consolidated Services.

Because the education industry has thousands — if not tens of thousands — of sustainability workgroups that manage sustainability projects; this proposed standard is noteworthy.  More complete information is available in NSF Public Groups Area linked below:

NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services

Comments are due August 13th.  CLICK HERE for a public review copy.   Send your comments to Kianda Franklin, (734) 827-3813, kfranklin@nsf.org with with copy to (psa@ansi.org).

All NSF standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to join them by CLICKING HERE.

Issue: [18-187]

Category: Administration & Management, Facility Asset Management, Public Safety, Risk Management

Contact: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben, Jack Janveja

 


LEARN MORE HERE:

ANSI Standards Action Announcement | PDF Page 7

Introducing NSF 391.1: A Sustainability Standard for Professional Services Providers

Designing, Installing, Operating, and Maintaining Microgrids

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Click on image for current information

The National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) is proposing a new standard — NECA 417 Recommended Practice for Designing, Installing, Operating, and Maintaining Microgrids.  The proposed standard applies to microgrids and provides recommended practices for their design, installation, commissioning, operation, and maintenance.   Public notification of this commenting opportunity filed with ANSI is available at the link below:

ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 7

Comments are due July 30th.  You may obtain an electronic copy from neis@necanet.org.  Send comments to Aga Golriz, (301) 215-4549, Aga.golriz@necanet.org.  Send a copy of your comments psa@ansi.org.

Additionally, we will refer this to the IEEE Education & Healthcare Committee for specific response.

 

Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The School of Athens

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is swiftly preparing a timely regulatory product — NFPA 3000 Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events — in response to the rise in active shooter incidents and the escalating impact of hostile events in all industries.   Many of these incidents occur in educational settings; hence our interest in promoting the participation of subject matter experts, individual school districts, colleges and universities and the many non-profit trade associations that service the education industry. 

Principal and Alternate Votes on the NFPA Technical Committee from educational institutions: Harvard School of Public Health,  Auburn University,  Missouri State University, University of Connecticut and Vanderbilt University.  None of them are casting User-interest votes according to the NFPA Classification of Committee Members.  In other words,  no representative of an entity that is subject to the provisions of the standard or that voluntarily uses the standard — such as a student or a teacher — has a vote on this committee.   They will depend upon the standard of care set by other interest categories.  See our ABOUT to understand why this is.  

This document will likely establish the standard of care for the prevention and management of these incidents.  It will provide the minimum criteria for the level of competence required for responders organizing, managing, and sustaining an active shooter and/or hostile event preparedness and response program based on the authority having jurisdiction’s (AHJ) function and assessed level of risk.  From the public announcement: (ANSI Standards Action January 12, 2018, Page 4):  

….[This consensus body] has been assembled in response to recent active shooter and hostile events of increasing magnitude occurring globally, which are resulting in tragic loss of life, as well as countless injuries. The very nature of these unpredictable, deadly events and the frequency of recurrence establishes the need for prompt dissemination of standards for preparedness and response. Moreover, the Council found that the urgency in addressing these serious safety concerns warranted the initiation of expedited standards development procedures.   The standard is being developed to address preparedness, planning, and response to cross-functional, multi-discipline, and cross-coordinated emergency events that are not already established by the NFPA. This includes provisions that establish criteria for the professional qualifications of those who are responsible for preparation, planning, exercising, and responding to cross-functional, cross-jurisdictional events. The standard is being processed as a Provisional Standard to ensure the prompt dissemination of new safety criteria….

The project’s prospectus is available at this link: NFPA Fact Sheet

An exposure draft was posted for public comment at this link: Public Input NFPA 3000 . Standards Michigan submitted original public comment (click here).  The First Draft Report is now available at this link:  NFPA 3000 Next Edition.

Comments are due August 1st.

For more information about this document please feel free to contact Jenny Depew, Project Administrator at 617-984-7505 or jdepew@nfpa.org.

Standards Michigan will be monitoring the participation of individuals,  school districts, higher education institutions as well as many of the education industry trade associations whose members may be stakeholders in this NFPA product.   We also extend an invitation to any high school, community college or university students who would like help participating in the development of this document.  We will show them how to set up an NFPA Public Comment account; how to navigate the NFPA TerraView site; how to navigate the current draft; how to find the appropriate location in the text for their idea; and how to key it in so that their idea is on the agenda of the NFPA 3000 technical committee.  

Ahead of the NFPA Conference & Expo June 11-14 (Las Vegas) we will host a breakout teleconference for NFPA 3000 on June 8th, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Eastern time, during which time we will examine all of the public input.    (See Calendar for login information; the same login as our weekly teleconferences)

We will place NFPA 3000 along with all the other NFPA documents we follow on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone may join these teleconferences with login information in this link: (Open Door Login).

Issue [18-15]

Category: Public Safety, Risk Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben


 

Finish Carpentry Installation

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

University of Southern California

The Architectural Woodwork Institute (AWI) seeks to be the global leader in architectural woodwork standards and related interior finishes.   It has released a redline for public review and comment its standard AWI 0620 Finish Carpentry/Installation.   AWI 0620 is written to provide comprehensive guidelines for the installation and finishing of architectural woodwork and related interior products.  This standard should be important to the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.

Comments are due  August 20th.  You may obtain an electronic copy from: agoodin@awinet.org.  Send your comments to the same email address (with copy to psa@ansi.org).  All consensus standards involving the architectural trades are on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time  (CLICK HERE to log in).  Additionally, we have set aside an hour per month to run through all consensus documents that are referenced in typical design, construction, operations & maintenance contracts.  The next teleconference is scheduled for July 23rd, 11 AM Eastern time, as described in the link below:

Design Guidelines & Specifications

Issue: [18-189]

Category; Architectural

ANSI Standards Action Notice | PDF Page 7


McMaster University

Elevator Safety Code

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Many colleges, universities, academic medical research and healthcare delivery campuses have hundreds of elevators whose design, construction, operations and maintenance is highly regulated by local and state level public safety agencies.   More than a few large research universities have thousands of elevators and, at cost upwards of $100,000 per floor just to build them (apart from the cost of running a certified in-house maintenance and contractor management staff) elevators represent a significant component of the #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities. 

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) is the developer of the most widely adopted consensus standard incorporated by reference into public safety law for this core technology.  The redline (“strike-and-bold”) of candidate changes for next revision of the parent document — ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators — is now available for public comment.  You will find it on the ASME Codes & Standards web page linked below:

ASME Consensus Documents Open for Public Review

Comments are due August 8th.   You may comment directly to ASME through Geraldine Burdeshaw, (212) 591-8523, burdeshawg@asme.org with a copy of your comments to psa@ansi.org.

The original University of Michigan infrastructure standards advocacy enterprise advocated #TotalCostofOwnership concepts across the entire A17.1 suite for several cycles.  That work continues here (see ABOUT).   Some facts and observations about that experience with the ASME A17 suite are listed below:

  • The A17 suite is broken down into many sub-disciplines (CLICK HERE for overview of the entire suite)
  • The technical committees are composed almost entirely by market incumbents* who are able to finance the cost of their participation into the price of the product they sell to the user-interest as identified in Section 2.3 of ANSI’s Essential Requirements
  • The absence of user interests is not the fault of ASME — it is the fault of the user interest; in our case the education facilities industry (the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.
  • Candidate changes are developed largely by the members of the technical committee; though other stakeholders may submit their suggestions to the technical committee chairman through the ASME administrative staff identified above at any time.  Keep in mind that A17.1 is on a 5-year revision cycle.
  • Only the changes are shown in the public review document.  A full understanding of the context of the changes will require purchase of the entire document through ASME; or through access to the public edition of the code through state regulatory agencies.
  • The technical committees meet face-to-face 4 to 5 times a year so many of the proposed changes have been vetted well before the A17.1 is released for public review.
  • The 45-day public review period is permitted by ANSI but is a very narrow window of opportunity for the user interest.

We will host an online review and comment development teleconference on July 19th, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM Eastern time which is open to everyone.   The entire ASME codes and standards suite is on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.   CLICK HERE to log in.

Issue: [11-50]

Category: Architectural, Mechanical, Electrical, Telecommunications, Public Safety, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Richard Robben, David Flint, Larry Spielvogel

Link to Legacy Workspace


* Market incumbent.

Door Locking Systems

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Loreto Secondary School | Kilkenny, Ireland

The Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (BHMI) is the ANSI accredited consensus standards developer for building access and egress technology education facility managers typically see referenced deep in the architectural and electrical sections of construction contract specifications (as in “Conform to all applicable standards”).  Architects, electrical and information and communications technology professionals usually have to collaborate on the application of the technology.

Gone are the days when a door was just a door (or “opening”) — at least insofar as public safety expectations are  concerned.   As we explain in our School Security Standards post the pace of standardization in public safety management and technology has increased; driven by events.  Some of the risk management can be accomplished with integrated technical solutions that are complex and more expensive to design, build, operate and maintain.

A fair estimate of the annualized cost of a door now runs on the order of $1000 to $10,000 per door (with hospital doors at the high end).

BHMI has opened several standards for public review that are relevant to our #TotalCostofOwnership for this technology which seeks an optimal (abeit, dynamic) reconciliation of the competing requirements of safety and economy.

BHMA A156.25 | Electrified Locking Devices (revision of 2013 edition)

Electrified locking systems are usually comprised of four functional components: locking devices, input devices, controlling devices, and power supplies. This standard establishes requirements for the locking devices, whose mechanical aspects are described in the applicable BHMA product standards; in addition, where the input or controlling device or both are an integral part of the locking device, they shall also be tested with the locking device covered by this standard. This standard includes requirements for cyclical, security, operational, strength, and environmental tests for these products.

BHMA A156.12 | Interconnected Locks (revision of 2013 edition).

This Standard establishes performance requirements for Interconnected Locks and and includes operational, cycle, strength, material evaluation, security, and finish tests.

BHMA A156.28 | Recommended Practices for Mechanical Keying Systems (reaffirmation of 2013 edition)

This recommended practice is intended for building owners, security professionals and others responsible for designing, implementing, and maintaining secure keying systems. Minimize legal liability by providing industry proven guidelines. It covers system design, to provide design criteria to establish and maintain a secure keying system. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the essential keying conference, establish good practices for effective key management, and give building owners the ability to extend the life of keying systems to meet future demands.

Comments are due August 6th.  You may obtain an electronic copies of any of the foregoing from MTierney@kellencompany.com and send comments to the same (with copy to psa@ansi.org).

BHMA has also announced the launch of a new standard:

BHMA A156.35 | Standard for Power Supplies

This Standard establishes requirements for external power supplies specifically designed for use with access control and burglar-alarm systems and accessories. Products will be classified based on their type, graded on performance, and given an energy efficiency rating. These basic criteria will enable a customer to make an informed decision to best fit their needs and ensure compatibility with the EAC system.

Roxbury Community College

All education facility safety standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.   Standards Michigan is the only organization with the tenure and deep expertise in the constellation of education industry safety standards that often compete, contradict or leave gaps for their application at the federal, state and local levels.   CLICK HERE to log in.

Issue: [16-183]

Category: Architectural, Electrical, Facility Asset Management, Telecommunication, Public Safety, #SmartCampus, Risk Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jim Harvey. Jim Vibbart

Link to original announcement: ANSI Standards Action | PDF Page 5


Uniform Mechanical Code

July 20, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The IAPMO Group has launched the 2021 revision cycle for the Uniform Mechanical Code; widely incorporated by reference into public safety law in many states.

BSR/IAPMO UMC 1-20xx, Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC). This code provides minimum standards to safeguard life or limb, health, property, and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance, or use of heating, ventilating, cooling, refrigeration systems, incinerators and other miscellaneous heat-producing appliances. The provisions of this code apply to the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, replacement, addition to, use, or maintenance of mechanical systems.

This document is developed so that its technical concepts correlate with the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).  The UPC provides standards and requirements to safeguard life or limb, health, property and public welfare by regulating and controlling the design, construction, installation, quality of materials, location, operation and maintenance or use of plumbing systems. The provisions of this code apply to the erection, installation, alteration, repair, relocation, addition to, use, or maintenance of plumbing systems.

Project Need: Designation of the UMC as an American National Standard has provided the built industry with uniform mechanical standards resulting in a reduction in training costs and product development costs, and in price reduction for consumers. This American National Standard provides consumers with safe mechanical systems while allowing latitude for innovation and new technologies. This project is intended to keep the code current.

Stakeholders: Manufacturers, users, installers and maintainers, labor research/standards/testing laboratories, enforcing authorities, consumers, and special experts. *

The Complete Monograph of proposed revisions for the 2021 Uniform Mechanical Code has been released and available for public review.

UMC 2018 Technical Committee Meeting Monograph

Comments are due January 3, 2019.   We encourage subject matter experts at the workpoint in the education facilities industry — i.e. tradespersons, foremen, supervisors that have a user-interest point of view (the stakeholder who is the final fiduciary)– to participate in the development of the next revision of the Uniform Mechanical Code.  As we explain in our ABOUT we find that standards developers routinely attempt to cultivate the user-interest.

More detailed information about how all stakeholders may participate is available this link: Public Comment Page.    You may communicate directly with IAPMO’s standards staff here: IAPMO (International Association of Plumbing & Mechanical Officials) 4755 E. Philadelphia Street Ontario, CA 91761 Office: (909) 472-4241 Gabriella Davis gaby.davis@iapmo.org

University of Richmond

Since 2012 we have been tracking several IAPMO documents which govern the safety and sustainability concepts in education facilities; among them:

Uniform Solar Energy and Hydronics Code [Issue 15-15]

Cross-Connection Control Professional Qualifications Standard [13-75]

Uniform Swimming Pool Code [Issue 13-14]

Aluminum and copper plumbing fixtures [Issue 12-99]

 

Issue: [17-299]


 

 

 

 

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