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School Assembly Spaces

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The International Code Council has received all comments on its proposed changes to Group A codes which includes 2021 International Building Code.   Breakout committees are now sorting through the public comments and preparing them for the Group A Public Comment Hearings, October 24-31, 2018 in Richmond Virginia.  See: Complete 2018 Group A Schedule.

We participate as an observer in several of those committees with an eye toward how new proposals with effect design, construction, operation and maintenance of education and university-affiliated healthcare facilities.   The record of our work and attention to concepts in play is reported routinely on this site and always on the agenda of our weekly open agenda teleconferences.  At the moment there is not much for public stakeholders to do until the Public Comment monograph is released to the public on August 31st.  We will be participating in the ICC breakout committee meetings until then.

On August 31st, 11:00 AM we will host a breakout teleconference of our own to sort through all the safety and sustainability issues in play as a result of the public comments.  Anyone is welcomed to join this teleconference with the login information in the link below:

ICC Group A Agenda Review

 

Issue: [17-237]

Category: Architectural, Facility Asset Management, Space Planning

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

University of Chicago Business School


Posted July 9, 2018

We focus today on a proposal to change the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) so that the general rules for (Group E) educational assembly in the 2021 IBC will read as follows:

303.1.3 Associated with Group E occupancies. A room or space used for assembly purposes that is associated with a Group E occupancy, with an occupant load of 300 or less, is not considered a separate occupancy.

This proposal (identified in our previous 2021 IBC posts) will require larger gymnasiums and auditoriums associated with a Group E occupancy to be protected with a fire suppression system in areas where the previous interpretation was to allow these larger spaces to be considered part of the Group E occupancy.   It affects our #TotalCostofOwnership agenda which seeks the optimal reconciliation of the competing requirements of safety and economy.

This proposal — made by the ICC Building Code Action Committee – will affect how architects and fire protection professionals approach new education facility design.   The parent committee rejected the proposal as recorded in the transcript of the ICC Group A Spring Committee Action Hearings.

 Search the Complete Monograph to see the proposal detail — PDF Page 71, Item G14-18

Comments are due July 16th.  You may comment directly on the ICC cdpACCESS platform (CLICK HERE). Additionally, public comment is possible at the Fall Committee Action Hearings.   The results of the Group A Hearings will be revisited during the Group A Public Comment Hearings, October 24-31, 2018 in Richmond Virginia.  See: Complete 2018 Group A Schedule.

We give all proposals involving education facilities a fair hearing through across the full span of the ICC Code Development Process.  Accordingly, this item will be on the agenda of our breakout teleconference scheduled for July 12th, 11:00 AM Eastern time during which time we will also review the positions of other education industry trade associations on this specific issue; if any.

ICC Group A Markup Session

We keep the entire ICC suite on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door Teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  CLICK HERE to log in.

 

Issue: [17-237]

Category: Architectural, Facility Asset Management, Space Planning

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Jack Janveja, Richard Robben

 

Savannah State University

Sustainability Criteria for Professional Services

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

“In the Sierras. /Lake Tahoe” | Albert Bierstadt, 1868 | Harvard University Art Museum

NSF International has released for public review a proposal for a new American national standard titled NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services.  From the project prospectus:

The Standard is one of the first to focus on the service industry subsectors described as “professional services”. Professional service firms are often characterized as those that have low capital intensity, high knowledge intensity, and a professionalized workforce. This Standard is applicable to the professional service subsectors identified in GSA’s Professional Services Schedule (“PSS”). These services include: Financial and Business Solutions; Advertising and Integrated Marketing Services; Language Services; Professional Engineering Services; Mission-Oriented Business Integrated Services; Worldwide Logistics Services; Environmental Services; and Consolidated Services.

Because the education industry has thousands — if not tens of thousands — of sustainability workgroups that manage sustainability projects; this proposed standard is noteworthy.  More complete information is available in NSF Public Groups Area linked below:

NSF 391 General Sustainability Assessment Criteria for Professional Services

Comments are due August 13th.  CLICK HERE for a public review copy.   Send your comments to Kianda Franklin, (734) 827-3813, kfranklin@nsf.org with with copy to (psa@ansi.org).

All NSF standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Anyone is welcomed to join them by CLICKING HERE.

Issue: [18-187]

Category: Administration & Management, Facility Asset Management, Public Safety, Risk Management

Contact: Mike Anthony, Richard Robben, Jack Janveja

 


LEARN MORE HERE:

ANSI Standards Action Announcement | PDF Page 7

Introducing NSF 391.1: A Sustainability Standard for Professional Services Providers

Finish Carpentry Installation

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

University of Southern California

The Architectural Woodwork Institute (AWI) seeks to be the global leader in architectural woodwork standards and related interior finishes.   It has released a redline for public review and comment its standard AWI 0620 Finish Carpentry/Installation.   AWI 0620 is written to provide comprehensive guidelines for the installation and finishing of architectural woodwork and related interior products.  This standard should be important to the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.

Comments are due  August 20th.  You may obtain an electronic copy from: agoodin@awinet.org.  Send your comments to the same email address (with copy to psa@ansi.org).  All consensus standards involving the architectural trades are on the agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time  (CLICK HERE to log in).  Additionally, we have set aside an hour per month to run through all consensus documents that are referenced in typical design, construction, operations & maintenance contracts.  The next teleconference is scheduled for July 23rd, 11 AM Eastern time, as described in the link below:

Design Guidelines & Specifications

Issue: [18-189]

Category; Architectural

ANSI Standards Action Notice | PDF Page 7


McMaster University

Energy Standard for Buildings

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Blue Ridge Community College

ASHRAE is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (what we call a regulatory product development “stream”).  It has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.

Addenda ai

This is a summary of incorporated changes from the first public review of addendum ai regarding field assembly of materials, and proper functioning of HVAC, service hot water, power, and lighting controls.

Addenda an

This addendum provides a new table of information about the new efficiency requirements from the US Department of Energy. It also provides new definitions that are needed to accompany the table. This addendum will have an energy savings impact in those buildings that use clean water pumps.

Addendum as

A proposed appendix to be included in Standard 90.1 as informative resources to aid in the understanding and adoption of the commissioning and testing by code officials, building owners, designers, commissioning providers, and others

Comments due August 13th. 

There is another batch of addenda — nine of them — that were released on August 3rd.   We will be sorting through them over the next few days but you can see them all now at the link below.

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

Comments are due September 2nd.

Keep in mind that technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 release public review documents in 30-to-90 day intervals and also meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Atlanta, Georgia January 14-16 2019.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference to attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We will also host a dedicated markup session for mechanical engineering standards on August 30th, 11 AM Eastern time during which time we will examine and markup documents released for public review by ASHRAE, ASME, AWWA, IAMPO and other organizations developing documents for incorporation by reference into public safety laws and energy conservation legislation.


Posted July 20, 2018

North Dakota State University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.

Addendum ao

A fan efficiency metric, called Fan Energy Index (FEI), was developed by manufacturer trade associations working collaboratively with efficiency advocates and DOE. FEI is defined in the calculation standard.  FEI is a ratio of electrical input powers that accounts for the electrical and mechanical losses upstream of the impeller shaft compared to a reference fan. The reference fan’s electrical input power is the numerator of the ratio, and the subject fan’s electrical input power is the denominator. The lower the subject fan’s electrical input power, the higher the FEI rating. FEI is a wire-to-air metric that considers losses of motors, variable speed drives, belts, etc., and FEI differentiates selections based on fan static pressure from selections based on fan total pressure.

Addendum ap

HVAC systems with simultaneous heating and cooling require supply air temperature (SAT) reset except in climate zones 0A through 3A. In these climate zones, several system types can successfully dehumidify the outside air while still providing SAT reset and reducing reheat energy use. Supply temperature reset saves significant heating energy in VAV reheat systems in high outside air systems, and that savings is higher in climate zone 3A than 2A, 1A and 0A. Separately dehumidifying the outside air reduces the total volume of air that must be cooled, significantly reducing cooling energy use in all the warm and humid climate zones

Addendum aq

Significant changes to Chapter 9 – Lighting Control

Addendum m

Table G3.1 Modeling Requirements for Calculating Proposed and Baseline Building Performance

Addendum z

Calculation of Design Energy Cost and Energy Cost Budget

Comments due July 29th.  There is another batch of addenda that span across several sections of content which we may cover in a future post.   Those addenda are due August 13th.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

ASHRAE is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (what we call a regulatory product development “stream”).  Technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 release public review documents in 30-to-90 day intervals and also meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Atlanta, Georgia January 14-16 2019.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference to attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  CLICK HERE to log in.  We will also host a dedicated markup session for mechanical engineering standards on July 24th, 11:00 AM during which time we will examine and markup documents released for public review by ASHRAE, ASME, AWWA, IAMPO and other organizations developing documents for incorporation by reference into public safety law.

 

Issue: [Various]

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to ANSI Standards Action Public Review | PDF Pages 30-55


Posted April 24, 2018

 

University of Houston

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  Two addenda have been released following the ASHRAE Winter 2018 Conference a few weeks ago.   The topical considerations of the redlines are summarized below:

Addendum ak: Revisions to Tables in Appendix G regarding solar heat gain coefficients in assembly spaces according to climatic zone.

Addendum bg:   A Simplified Building Method intended to provide a simple approach for contractors and designers who design or renovate office, school and retail buildings up to 25,000 ft2

Comments are due April 23rd.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

Technical committees developing ASHRAE 90.1 typically meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Houston Texas, June 23 through 27.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference at least attend the ASHRAE 90.1 technical meetings.

All ASHRAE standards are a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.

 


March 26, 2018

Harvard University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which will affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities.  Two batches of addenda have been released following the ASHRAE Winter 2018 Conference a few weeks ago.   The topical considerations of the redlines are summarized below:

Addendum ac: Definitions

Addendum ad: Compliance paths

Addendum ai: Commissioning and functional testing cost 

Addendum q: Reorganization of Section 5  

Comments are due March 26th.  You may key in your comments directly to ASHRAE at the link below:

Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

The ASHRAE suite of standards is a standing item on our weekly Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.

 


September 20, 2017

The New School | Manhattan

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

Addendum AA

The purpose of this addenda is to resolve possible confusion on the applicability of controls to the listed lighting equipment and applications in the exceptions to 9.2.2.3 (Interior Lighting Power Densities) and to ensure that the control requirements called out in the lighting power densities exceptions list are specifically spelled out in the controls section. This will improve compliance and prevent users from missing a control requirement.

Addendum G

Summary of independent substantive changes:

• An editorial change is made in the definition of “occupied-standby mode” to avoid confusion with the definition of population.

• Occupied Standby Controls is moved from the mandatory section to the prescriptive section so anyone who does not want to implement occupied standby controls can use the performance compliance approach.

• Clarification was added that the procedure only applies when using Standard 62.1’s Ventilation Rate Procedure since the reference to spaces that can be unventilated in standby mode is in the Standard 62.1 VRP Table. If natural ventilation alone is used or the IAQ Procedure is used to calculate ventilation rates, this section does not apply.

Addendum V

Most hospitals use reheat HVAC systems with simultaneous heating and cooling. Even with required air or water economizers, there are many hours with simultaneous heating and cooling use. It is generally lower cost and consumes less site and source energy to generate heating water and chilled water with a heat recovery chiller (aka heat pump chiller) than it is to use separate boilers that comply with 90.1. Evaluation of a typical hospital in multiple climate zones shows a potential for reasonable recovery with a heat recovery chiller that is sized between 7% and 12% of the cooling plant peak load, depending on climate zone. For simplification, the minimum is set at 7% of total cooling load across the board in this proposal. An economic analysis was made using the 90.1 scalar method based on installed heat recovery chiller costs of $1,800 per ton. The resulting scalars were all under 10 years for required climate zones vs. a scalar limit of 13 years. The trend of higher savings in warmer climate zones was used to include climate zones 1 and 0 without specific analysis. The payback in Climate Zone 2B was under 5 years.

Addendum W

Significant energy and water savings could accrue nationwide if these revised flowrates for showerheads and faucets are adopted. At the levels in the addendum, all fixtures except kitchen faucets match the WaterSense specifications, so they are readily identifiable and available in the market place. The proposal provides the following reductions in maximum flow when compared to the Uniform Plumbing Code and International Plumbing Code that both have the same flow limits

Addendum Y

The rules in Appendix G are ambiguous with regards to how sizing runs are performed. The current edition allows the use of either annual historic weather files or 99.6% design day heating and 1% dry bulb and wet-bulb cooling design temperatures. It is also silent on what diversity schedules to use for internal gains. Leaving these choices up to the user means that the stringency of the baseline can vary significantly which should be avoided. This proposal fixes those parameters so that they are modeled using the same approach by all modeling teams. The proposal clarifies that plant sizing is based on coincident loads

Comments are due October 1st.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 90.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).

We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

 


August 14, 2017

Arkansas State University

ASHRAE International has released several addenda to its widely adopted standard ASHRAE 90.1  Standard 90.1-2016, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, several of which may affect the design, construction and operation of education facilities:

Addendum M

When Addendum bm to Standard 90.1-2013 was developed it set baseline requirements in Appendix G approximately equal to the stringency of the 2004 Standard. Rules for modelling infiltration were developed in parallel to Addendum bm and included proposed building infiltration at 0.4 cfm/ft2 of the building envelope at a fixed building pressure differential of 0.3 in. of water. However the strategy of setting baseline requirements at the 2004 level was omitted and baseline infiltration was set same as the proposed building. This proposed change addresses that oversight by adding a requirement that the baseline include infiltration at 0.8 cfm/ft2 greater than that assumed for a building compliant with the 2013 Standard. This addendum impacts an optional performance path in the standard designed to provide increased flexibility and therefore was not subjected to cost effectiveness analysis

Indiana Wesleyan University

Addendum N

This addendum deletes (or modifies the terminology of) obsolete definitions that are no longer in use or necessary in ASHRAE 90.1. This addendum does not affect the energy use of the standard and has no economic impact.

Addendum S

The following change is required in order to capture the 5% limit on renewable energy proposed for Appendix G compliance. Using this formula allows the PCI to always reflect the actual building design without any adjustment for renewable energy contribution. Instead the PCI is adjusted such that it reflects the limit on renewable energy.  This addendum also clarifies for both Section 11 and Appendix G which renewable systems are eligible. This addendum impacts an optional performance path in the standard designed to provide increased flexibility and therefore was not subjected to cost effectiveness analysis.

University of Texas Antonio

Addendum T

This proposed addendum expands the exterior LPD application table to cover additional exterior spaces that are not currently in the exterior LPD table. The expansion references appropriate space types found in the interior LPD table with appropriate modifications of the value that recognizes the lower need for lighting power and illumination in exterior applications.  This addendum will advance energy savings by providing an appropriate LPD value for exterior applications where one did not exist before which potentially allows for either exemption or the use of a higher than appropriate value. This addendum has no cost increase because it only applies existing requirements to additional spaces and applications

Addendum U

This proposed addendum applies existing parking lot and other exterior lighting requirements (where applicable) to exterior lighting that is associated with and tied to a building as it is powered from electrical service on the building site.  This addendum will advance energy savings by providing appropriate LPD limits primarily to parking lots that are constructed and/or renovated as part of a building site to support the building in the same manner as current requirements in 90.1.   This addendum has no cost increase because it only applies existing requirements to additional spaces and applications

University of Utah Hospital

Comments are due August 27th.   ASHRAE invites anyone to comment on the development of ASHRAE 90.1 on its Online Standards Action & Public Review Draft page.  (Click here).   We will place these on the agenda of our regular Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time, Open Door teleconference.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login information below:

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/718914669

You can also dial in using your phone. United States : +1 (408) 650-3123 Access Code: 718-914-669

 

 

 

National Electrical Code 2020

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

University of Michigan College of Engineering

The National Fire Protection Association has released the First Draft Report for all 19 technical committees writing the 2020 National Electrical Code.  All reports are available at the link below:

2020 National Electric Code Public Review

Comments are due August 30th. 

All NFPA Standards are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM — which are open to everyone (CLICK HERE to log in).   Because of Standards Michigan tenure in advocating the NFPA standards suite — we collaborate closely with IEEE SCC-18 — the committee that coordinates and harmonizes user-interest concepts in the NFPA and IEEE electrical safety standards suite.   We also collaborate closely with experts on the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times monthly.  The next online teleconference is scheduled for August 14th — at 15:00 in Central Europe and 3:00 PM Eastern Time in the Americas.  (CLICK HERE) to log in.

Several online collaboration sessions on all NEC articles have been scheduled.  See CALENDAR for date, time, agenda and login information.

 

Issue: [Various]

Category: Electrical, Telecommunications, Facility Asset Management, #SmartCampus

Contact:  Jim Harvey (jharvey@ieee.org), Mike Anthony (maanthony@ieee.org), Rich Robben (rrobben1952@gmail.com), Christel Hunter (chunter@cerrowire.com)

 


Posted March 24, 2018

Time to revisit the “design regulations” that govern

the power chain within healthcare facilities

We are now reviewing public input for the 2020 revision to NFPA 70 the National Electrical Code (NEC) on all Code-Making Panels and through various Task Groups set up by the NFPA ahead of the First Draft meetings in Hiltonhead, South Carolina in January 2018.

We are exploring the amount of easily obtainable branch circuit and feeder data in healthcare facilities to confirm or deny our hypothesis that the power chain — within a limited class of healthcare facilities — can be reduced in order to improve safety and advance sustainability in terms of reducing energy and material waste. The amount of money involved runs into tens of billions of reduced #TotalCostofOwnership annually.

We collaborate with IEEE Standards Association SCC18, the IEEE Industrial Applications Society, the IEEE Power Engineering Society,  the IEEE Technology & Engineering Management Society and the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (IEEE E&H), academic departments of several educational institutions and several of the many education industry trade associations.

One of the concepts that the original University of Michigan Plant Operations regulatory advocacy enterprise advocated for — beginning with the 1999 NEC — is revision of the feeder and branch circuit “design” guidance in NEC Chapter 2.   Recognizing the gathering pace of variable speed drives and LED-lighting installation that dramatically reduced power densities, our proposals were intended to place downward pressure on the over-building of educational facility power supply chains; explained in research the University of Michigan funded and catalyzed (Click here) and explained in broad terms in these videoclips: (Click here)

We are now turning our attention to exploring remedies for a similar condition in academic medical facilities; collaborating with the American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) and the  IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee (IEEE E&H) to gather data for plug loads.

Plug Load Query

Several teleconferences are scheduled to pull together data driven concepts to present to the NEC technical committees during the 2020 revision cycle.   Dates, times and login information are available in the links below:

IEEE SCC18 National Electrical Code Teleconferences

Teleconferences | August 14, 2018

 

Contact:  Jim Harvey (jharvey@ieee.org), Mike Anthony (maanthony@ieee.org), Rich Robben (rrobben1952@gmail.com), Christel Hunter (chunter@cerrowire.com)

Campus Outdoor Lighting

August 13, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

The IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee has been developing a new chapter for designing, building, operating and maintaining campus exterior lighting systems in the emergent IEEE 3001.9 Recommended Practice for the Design of Power Systems for Supplying Commercial and Industrial Lighting Systems.  Campus exterior lighting systems generally run in the 100 to 10,000 fixture range and are, arguably, the most visible characteristic of public safety infrastructure.   Some major research universities have exterior lighting systems that are larger and more complex than cooperative and municipal power company lighting systems which are regulated by public service commissions.

While there has been considerable expertise in developing illumination concepts by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, Illumination Engineering Society, the American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers, the International Electrotechnical Commission and the International Commission on Illumination, none of them contribute to leading practice discovery for the actual power chain for these large scale systems.   The standard of care has been borrowed, somewhat anecdotally, from public utility community lighting system practice. These concepts need to be revisited as the emergent #SmartCampus takes shape.

The Industrial & Commercial Power Systems Department of IEEE is charged with writing all IEEE power system standards and coordinating their development with the Power Engineering Society and SCC-18 — the committee responsible for coordinating IEEE standards with NFPA standards.  IEEE 3001.9 will replace the lighting chapters the legacy IEEE Red Book.

A draft document for wiring methods for campus exterior lighting systems was presented at the meeting of the IEEE 3001.9 Working Group at the Industrial & Commercial Power Systems Conference, May 4 through 9 in Niagara Falls, Canada.  The working group is now commenting on an exposure draft that was circulated during those meetings.  Other subject matter experts in campus exterior lighting systems are encouraged to communicate directly with Steven Townsend (steven.townsend@gm.com) or Pat Roder (p.roder@ieee.org) about participating in the development of IEEE 3001.9 generally.

The working group that is writing the IEEE campus outdoor lighting system standard will meet again online again on August 14th, 11 AM Eastern time.   Anyone is welcomed to click in and follow the drafting action with the login information below:

IEEE E&H Committee Teleconference Login

All IEEE standards are on the standing agenda of the Standards Michigan Open Agenda teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  Click here to log in.  The IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee also meets twice today and the campus lighting standard will be on the agenda.  Electrical professionals in the education and healthcare industry are encouraged to join the teleconference with the login information below:

Calendar

Issue: [15-199]

Category: Electrical, Public Safety, Architectural, #SmartCampus, Space Planning, Risk Management

Contact: Mike Anthony, Kane Howard, Jim Harvey, Dev Paul, Steven Townsend

 

University Art Collections

August 12, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Click on images for more information.   Links to the consensus documents that establish the standard of care in designing, building, operating and maintaining academic art collections appear at the bottom of this page.

Yale University Art Museum | “Young Woman and Child | Berthe Morisot (1966)

Princeton University Art Museum | “Mount Adams, Washington” | Albert Bierstadt (1875)

Michigan State University | Broad Art Museum

 

“Boathouses and Lobster Pots” | Fairfield Porter | Amherst College Art Museum

 

Harvard University | In the Sierras, Lake Tahoe (Albert Bierstadt)

Stanford University Art Museum

 

Stanford University | “The Burghers of Calais” by Auguste Rodin

 

University of Texas | Indians of the Northwest (Thomas Hill)

Arizona State University Art Museum

 

 

Yale University | The Battle of Bunker Hill (John Trumbull)

 

Dante Gabriel Rossetti | La Pia de Tolomei | University of Kansas Art Museum

 

 

University of Minnesota Art Museum

 


LEARN MORE:

Code for the Protection of Cultural Resource Properties – Museums, Libraries, and Places of Worship

American Alliance of Museums | Facilities and Risk Management Standards

FM Global Special Protection Systems

Illumination Engineering Society | Museum and Art Gallery Lighting Committee

Association of Academic Museums and Galleries

Standards Curricula Program

August 12, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

NIST Headquarters (Click on image)

The Standards Coordination Office of the National Institute of Standards and Technology conducts standards-related programs, and provides knowledge and services that strengthen the U.S. economy and improve the quality of life.  Its goal is to equip U.S. industry with the standards-related tools and information necessary to effectively compete in the global marketplace. 

Every year it awards grants to colleges and universities through its Standards Services Curricula Cooperative Agreement Program  to provide financial assistance to support curriculum development for the undergraduate and/or graduate level. These cooperative agreements support the integration of standards and standardization information and content into seminars, courses, and learning resources. The recipients will work with NIST to strengthen education and learning about standards and standardization. 

The 2019 grant cycle will require application submissions sometime in April 2019.   Specifics about the deadline will be posted on the NIST and ANSI websites.  We will pass on those specifics as soon as they are known.*

The winners of the 2018 grant cycle are Bowling Green State University, Michigan State University,  Oklahoma State University, and Texas A&M University. (Click here)

Information about applying for the next grant cycle is available at this link (Click here) and also by communicating with Ms. Mary Jo DiBernardo (301-975-5503; maryjo.dibernardo@nist.gov)

 

* Last year the application submissions were due at NIST on April 16, 2018Click here for link to the previous announcement.   It is likely that the deadline for the current year grant cycle will follow the same pattern.

Musical Instruments

August 12, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

Click on image

We are seeking an update on the status of this proposed standard.  It is likely that even if the United States does not participate through an ANSI administered US Technical Advisory Group; other nations will.   We will identify that action as the information becomes available and collaborate with other universities as those opportunities present themselves.


Posted April 8, 2018

As the U.S. member body to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) encourages its members and relevant stakeholders to comment on an ISO new work item proposal focused on musical instruments.

Link to ANSI Announcement

The proposal, submitted by the Standardization Administration of China (SAC), notes that currently there are no existing technical committees or subcommittees directly related to musical instruments inside ISO or the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The main work of the new committee would focus on the standardization of musical instruments and related products, including standardization of terminology, classification, test methods, products, and assessment rules.

A new committee would consider systematically, comprehensively, and globally the current situation of musical instruments and related products and develop standards for terminology, methods, and major musical instrument products, thereby providing a valuable guide to relevant stakeholders in this field.

Standardization is proposed to be carried out mainly in three areas:

– The first aspect would focus on common standards, including classification and terminology;

– The second aspect would focus method standards, including the assessment of musical performance and test methods of limits of hazardous substances for musical instruments;

– The final aspect would focus on standards for application-oriented products and accessories, including main musical instrument products like piano, violin family (including violin, viola, cello, double bass), guitar, accordion, aerophones, bow, string.

All interested U.S. parties are invited to review the proposal, which includes an initial proposed work plan as well as information on how it may relate to existing international standardization work as well as relevant stakeholders and organizations.

Comments are due April 13th.  Please submit comments to Steve Cornish, ANSI senior director of international policy scornish@ansi.org,  Based on the input received from U.S. stakeholders, a recommended ANSI position and any comments will be developed and presented to the ANSI ISO Committee (AIC) for approval before the ISO voting deadline of May 17, 2018.

 

 

Issue: [18-68]

Category: Academic

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Instrument Associations

Technical Negotiation Skills for Students

August 12, 2018
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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Click on image for original ANSI post

Too little standardization: chaos.  Too much standardization: stifled innovation.  Guiding the next generation through technical and business landscapes where good minds disagree on reconciling these competing requirements of safety, economy and sustainability is an initiative undertaken by the Committee on Education of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) — the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system.  ANSI is the official U.S. representative to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and, via the U.S. National Committee, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

The program — Negotiation Skills Competition — now in its third year (somewhat like “moot court” competitions in most law schools) — is explained more fully in the link below:

Calling all University Students and Professors

Participation in the competition is open to university teams only, and space is limited to four to six teams. Multi-disciplinary teams consisting of undergraduate or graduate students in different areas of study are highly encouraged.

To be considered for participation in the competition, university students and professors should contact ANSI’s Lisa Rajchel at lrajchel@ansi.org as soon as possible.  Lisa would like a commitment to participate by September 1st.

Discovering leading practice for public safety in schools, colleges and universities is a high priority for the education industry.  We have been keeping track of school security standards for over 10 years now and it is only just recently have we observed the action of trade association involvement gather pace:

School Security Standards

Developing public policy solutions to the school security problem — based upon the foundation of ANSI-accredited consensus documents — is a near perfect case study for faculty and students to understand the following:

The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

White House Office of Management and Budget Circular A-119

The legislative drafting technique of “incorporation by reference”

Legislative lobbying, litigation and education industry trade associations

Because the elevated level of discussion on school security presents a “teachable moment” — and because so few faculty have experience wit leading practice discovery in ANSI accredited standards processes from the user-interest point of view — Standards Michigan re-states is standing invitation to faculty and students to click in to any of our weekly Open Door teleconferences — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern time.  During breakout teleconferences we will walk through public input and commenting opportunities — keystroke by keystroke — in interactive sessions on online public review environments.   We get very specific.  

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