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False Alarm Reduction

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False Alarm Reduction

January 17, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“Students from the Pestalozzian Academy” | Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (1806} | Meadows Museum Southern Methodist University

The Security Industry Association (SIA) has initiated a revision cycle for its standard — SIA CP-01 Features for False Alarm Reduction — which asserts leading practice for reduction of false alarms.  To paraphrase the benefits of this ANSI-accredited consensus document:

  • Saves facility management enterprises time and money with decreased alarm dispatches and programmable swinger shutdown.
  • Provides technical specifications for cross zoning and carbon monoxide zoning.
  • Provides commissioning, inspection, testing and maintenance guidance.
  • Provides guidance for installing security measures like the duress alarm that can be entered by a user to trigger a silent call for help while under threat from an intruder.
  • Features, including specifications for carbon monoxide zones and qualifications for swinger shutdown.

From the ANSI Project Initiation Notification Announcement:

Project Need: False Alarms and False Dispatches continue to be a thorn in the side of municipalities and law enforcement.

Stakeholders: Security integrators, security manufacturers, law enforcement, central stations, monitoring companies, and
some end-users (consumers) of security.

Scope: This standard details recommended design features for security systems, control panels, and their associated devices to reduce the incidence of false alarms. These features are applicable to both residential and commercial properties protected by an electronic security system. This standard is intended for use by manufacturers in the design of security systems and alarm signal receivers. It is also intended for reference by all affected parties, including security system installers, specifiers, and users; central station owners and operators; manufacturers of central station products, such as receivers and automation software; and local authorities

We will be watching for release of public review drafts.   You may do so yourself at the SIA standards home page linked below:

Industry Standards

You are encouraged to communicate directly with SIA: CONTACT 

Security standards for the education industry are developing on a near-weekly basis.  Every incident spawns new workgroups that compete with incumbents, consortia and open source licensing organizations to set the standard of care through documents, accreditation, training and other revenue-capture instruments.  We count the better part of 100 of them including the standards spawned from ad hoc alliances and partnerships.

Accordingly, we refer this SIA action to the agenda of our monthly school security standards teleconferences where we sort through the competitive landscape of education industry security standards.  The next teleconference is scheduled for January 15th, 11 AM EST.    For a draft agenda send a request for the School Security Standing Agenda to bella@standardsmichigan.com.   Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

 

Issue: [13-143]

Category: Facility Asset Management, Public Safety, #SmartCampus, Risk Management, US Department of Education

Colleagues: Andrew Updegrove, Mike Anthony, Richard Robben

 


LEARN MORE:

The Fire Technicians Network: Swinger

ConsortiumInfo.org

Standards Virginia

Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code

January 17, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“Mechanic and Steam Pump” | Lewis W. Hine (1921)

The heating and cooling requirements of K-12 schools, college and university educational, medical research and healthcare delivery campuses are a large market for boiler pressure vessel manufacturers, installers, maintenance personnel and inspectors.  The safety rules for these large, complex and frankly, fearsome systems have been developed by many generations of mechanical engineering professionals in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC).  Many state and local governments incorporate the BPVC by reference into public safety regulations.  Many large research universities have district energy systems in which these systems are the central fixture.

ASME has released a large batch of redlines of proposed changes to the BPVC suite:

ASME Codes & Standards Home Page

Comments are due February 4th.

You may download electronic copies of the redlines from the page linked above and/or communicate directly with ASME standards administration staff.  There are so many changes that we must refer you to the page linked above for the individual staffer.  Make sure you send a copy of your comments psa@ansi.org.

Our tenure in codes and standards development across the entire library of American national standards offers an authoritative point of view about business models of ANSI accredited standards developers and the knowledge communities that surround them.  There are ways for the education industry — both the business and academic side — to lower #TotalCostofOwnership with effective use of its economic footprint in the development of this and other ASME standards (such as the elevator safety codes.   We can discuss specifics about what we mean by this during our next Mechanical Engineering teleconference on January 14th, 11 AM Eastern time.  Use the login credentials in the upper right of our home page.

 

 

Issue: [12-33]. [15-4], [15-161], [16-77] and [18-4]

Category: District Energy, Energy, Mechanical

Contact: Eric Albert, Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

LEARN MORE:

Standards Michigan BPVC Archive

ASME BPVC Resources

Big Ten & Friends Energy Conference 2019

Standards Michigan Workspace (Requires access credentials from bella@standardsmichigan.com)

Source: ANSI Standards Action

Standards New York


LEARN MORE

 

 

 

Power Supply Cord Safety

January 17, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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A ward of the hospital at Scutari where Florence Nightingale worked and helped to restructure the modern hospital | William Simpson (1823-1899)

We find cord sets at the center of a great deal of action in electrical safety standards in the United States and globally in standards action administered by the International Electrotechnical Commission.  In the proposed changes to the method in which the lengths of cord sets are measured it is noteworthy that the proposal has been submitted by the only global electrical product manufacturer – Grenoble, France-based Schneider Electric — the only remaining stand-alone publicly traded electrical product manufacturer in the world.  As such, Schneider has an informed point of view about the value chain of utilization voltage devices; cord sets being the most common manner in which human beings interact with electrical energy.

The proposed changes simply have to do with how the lengths of cord sets are measured though, in some applications (such as in clinical delivery settings), we find cord sets — particularly how they inform the placement of 120 VAC power outlets — at the center of surprising technical debate.  First, let’s have a look at scope of UL 817 Standard for Cord Sets and Power Supply Cords :

1.1 This standard specifies the requirements for cord sets and power-supply cords employing molded-on or assembled-on fittings, rated 600 V maximum, and intended for use in non-hazardous locations in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

1.2 This Standard also specifies the requirements for molded-on general-use attachment plugs and cord connectors.

1.3 This Standard also specifies the requirements for hospital grade attachment plugs and cord connectors.

1.4 This Standard also specifies the requirements for cord restraint devices.

1.5 These requirements do not cover cord sets intended for temporary outdoor use – not to exceed 90 days – with outdoor equipment, Christmas-tree, and other seasonal decorative-lighting outfits. Such devices are covered by the Standard for Outdoor Seasonal-Use Cord-Connected Wiring Devices, UL 2438.

The proposed changes to the length measurement, the subject of the commenting opportunity, is linked below:

CLICK HERE for proposed revisions to UL 817 | Pages 30-33

Though the redline mentions the seasonal use power cord class of product, it is not clear whether the measurement methodology applies to hospital grade power cord product — the subject of the UL 60601-1 suite, Part 1: General Requirements for Safety    Getting this clarified may be the subject of a public comment.*

Comments are due February 3rd.

You may send comments (with copy to psa@ansi.org) to: Linda Phinney, (510) 319-4297, Linda.L.Phinney@ul.com.   We will also refer this to the agenda of the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets 4 times monthly in European and American time zones.  The next online teleconferences are scheduled for January 15th and is open to the public.

 

 

 

Issue: [19-4]

Category: Architectural, Electrical,  Structural, Facility Asset Managemet

Contact: Mike Anthony, Matt Dozier, Jim Harvey

* Power cords used with North American medical equipment must be hospital-grade. The plug makes the cord hospital-grade, nothing else. The colors of the plugs or the cable jacket are preference only, and are not part of the standard. Most commonly, you will notice solid gray cordsets and occasionally clear-blue male plugs. However, it is the construction of the male that determines if your power cord is approved for use in hospitals.


LEARN MORE:

Power Cords

UL White Book

 

Global Academic Competition on Standardization Challenges

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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Click on image for more information

Some follow up on the 2018 International Electrotechnical Commission(IEC) academic faculty paper competition concluded last month at the IEC General Meeting in Busan, Korea.  which was jointly sponsored the the IEC and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

The topics covered by the winning papers are summarized below:

New Rules for Standard-Setting and New Roles of Standardization Bodies in the era of IoT  (Yonsei University  & University of Glasgow).  The authors outline how so-called ‘standard-clashes’ are no longer between those in the same industry but instead between different industry sectors. They provide case studies in the areas of electrical vehicle charging and connected car communication systems.

Recommendations for a ‘smart’ system Single Sign-on  (Aachen University) An outline of the difficulty of standardization for ‘smart’ systems such as smart cities and proposed the establishment of a ‘smart’ system single sign-on.

Recommendations for electrical measurement data management standards in the oil and gas industries (American Bureau of Shipping)

Recommendations for synthetic index to measure the degree of standardization in a given country (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid)

Identification of knowledge and technology flows between standard making communities and how they can be used to indicate industry changes  (Korea Electronics Technology Institute)

Detailed coverage is available in the link below:

IEC IEEE KATS Challenge Award winners

As always, we work to translate these blue-key conceptions into meaningful results at the workpoint in order to lower the #TotalCostofOwnership of the emergent #SmartCampus.  In the United States alone, the education facilities industry spends $300 billion — the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.  Campuses are cities-within-cities and perfect study units for cities of the future.

We host a dedicated work session every month to review the blistering pace of international standards action.  The next session is scheduled for January 17th, 11 AM Eastern time.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.  For an advance draft agenda, please send a request to bella@standardsmichigan.com.  We also collaborate closely with the IEEE Education & Healthcare Facilities Committee which meets online 4 times per month and are open to everyone.  The next meetings are January 29th 15:00 in Europe and 3:00 PM Eastern time in the Americas.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Academics, Electrical, Telecommunications, #SmartCampus, Informatics, Information, International, Public Policy, Telecommunications, US Department of Commerce

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Robert G. Arno, Neal Dowling, Jim Harvey, Mike Hiler, Christel Hunter


LEARN MORE:

9TH IEC Young Professionals Workshop

 


Last Update: October 12, 2018

(Original post: January 27, 2018)

Seoul National University

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Korean Agency for Technology and Standards (KATS) have collaborated a Call for Papers addressing “Future challenges in standardization.”  The winners are scheduled to be announced in October during the 2018 IEC General Meeting in Busan, Korea.

This collaboration presents opportunities to faculty and staff from the fields of technology and engineering, economics, social science, policy and the law to share diverse perspectives and insights on future challenges in standardization.  Monetary prizes will be awarded to the three best submissions. LEARN MORE HERE.

Note that this opportunity is similar in its goals as ANSI’s Annual Student Paper Competition.

The U.S. National Committee (USNC) is the U.S. member body to IEC. The USNC is a totally integrated committee of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Learn more about the USNC and its work at www.ansi.org/usnc.  Feel free to click in to any of our daily teleconferences or our next monthly international standards teleconference on October 18th, 11 AM Eastern time.   We always use the login credentials available at the upper right of our home page.

Link to original ANSI announcement

Link to related post on ISO Educational organization management systems led by South Korea


 

Education Industry Construction Spend

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
one comments

Image credit: ESPN College Town

Update on the build-out of these “cities-within-cities” which,

when observed as a network, constitute a sovereign nation.

The value of construction put in place in October 2018 by the US education industry proceeded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $76.9 billion, 2.6 percent above the revised September estimate of $75.0 billion.  (This number does not include renovation and new construction in university-affiliated health care delivery enterprises).   The complete report is available at the link below:

https://www.census.gov/construction/c30/pdf/release.pdf

At this rate, the US education facilities industry (which includes colleges, universities, technical/vocational and K-12 schools, most university-affiliated medical research and healthcare delivery enterprises, etc.)  is the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States.  For more perspective consider total public + private construction ranked according to the tabulation most recently released:

$101.564 billion | (Electrical) power

$96.474 billion  | Educational

$95.353 billion | Highway and street

$ 91.665 billion | Commercial

$73.322 billion | Office

$42.556 billion | Healthcare

Overall — including construction, energy, custodial services, furnishings, security. etc., — the non-instructional spend plus the construction spend of the US education facilities is approximately $300 billion per year.  Cash throughput at this scale draws comparisons with the $223 billion annual revenue of Berkshire-Hathaway (a Fortune #2 corporation) and the $304 billion national gross domestic product of Denmark.

 

Construction cameras at US schools, colleges and universities

The next (November construction activity) report will be released on January 2nd — unless the partial federal government shutdown prohibits work on the monthly update. 

We encourage the education facilities industry to contribute to the accuracy of these monthly reports by responding the US Census Bureau’s data gathering contractors.

We are “open” every day at 11 AM Eastern time for one-on-one discussion about this and other content on this site.  Click in with the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

LEARN MORE:

Sightlines: Capital Investment College Facilities

OxBlue: Time-Lapse Construction Cameras for Education

Architectural Billing Index

IBISWorld Education Sector

Who are “incumbent stakeholders”?

American School & University


From our archives:

Sustainable cities and communities

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“A Square with Imaginary Buildings” | Hendrik van Steenwijck (1614)

The United States Technical Advisory Group (US-TAG), with oversight by the American National Standards Institute and administration by NFPA International, is participating in the development of an International Organization for Standardization consensus document that will shape policy development for smart cities (sustainable cities and communities).   The ISO Global Secretariat is ANSI’s French counterpart Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR) as shown in the map below.

As cities-within-cities, major international research universities are stakeholders in these discussions because of the town-gown infrastructure interface in the emergent #SmartCampus.  We have been participants in this project since 2014.

Click here for the Business Plan.

Consensus documents emerging from ISO/TC 268 tend to be large, fast-moving and highly interdependent.  Drafts for US stakeholder comment and balloting arrive on a monthly as new workgroups are spawned from the core ISO TC/268 committees.  NFPA is in the process of developing a platform for managing the documents that must be reviewed, commented and balloted.

CLICK ON IMAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Owing to copyright restrictions upon ISO consensus documents we are unable to reproduce draft documents in their entirety beyond the balloting periods.  We limit our use of these documents to collaborations with subject matter experts in knowledge of, and concern for, the user-interest in the US education industry.

We are happy to review these documents any day at 11 AM Eastern time.  Alternatively, you may click into our next International Standards teleconference scheduled for January 17, 2019, 11 AM Eastern time.  In either case use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.   You may also communicate directly with Robert Solomon (rsolomon@nfpa.org) and/or Linda MacKay (lmackay@nfpa.org) at NFPA International, the US TAG Administrator for this project.

 

January 7, 2019 Update:

No commentable documents at this time

December 18, 2018 Update:

No commentable documents at this time

November 1, 2018 Update:

ISO / DIS 37155 Framework for Integration and Operation of Smart Community Infrastructures – Part 1: Opportunities and Challenges from Interactions in Smart Community Infrastructures from all Aspects through the Life Cycle.

* Owing to copyright restrictions you must send an email to bella@standardsmichigan.com to access to the documents

https://standardsmichigan.com/iso-267-access-to-documents-open-to-public-review/

  Comments are due November 19th

October 1, 2018 Update:

Comments due October 5th:

14-101 ISO 268 Item ISO IEC 17021 Public Review Draft

September 18, 2018 Update:

Comments are due September 24th on the documents linked below:

14-101 ISO WD TS 37107 SEPT 2018 Sustainable Cities

14-101 ISO CD 37160 SEPT 2018 Sustainable Cities

September 16, 2018 Update:

The US TAG convened at NFPA Headquarters last this week.   Since some of the material is copyright protected, we welcome education facility professionals to click in any day at 11 AM to review the commenting opportunities open to US stakeholders generally, and education industry professionals specifically.

Draft document now open for public review: Smart community infrastructures — Guidance on smart transportation for allocation of parking lots in cities. (ISO Stage 20.20) Comments are due at NFPA on September 13th

US TAG meets at NFPA Headquarters in Quincy, Massachusetts September 12 and 13.   Mike Anthony will be in attendance.

August 2018 Update:

Draft document now open for public review: Sustainable development in communities — Indicators for Smart Cities.  Comments are due at NFPA on August 27th.

Draft document now open for public review: Guidelines on Data Exchange and Sharing for Smart Community Infrastructures.  Comments are due at NFPA on August 24th 

One draft document is now open for public review:   Smart community infrastructures — Smart transportation for rapid transit in/between large city zones and the surrounding areas (ISO/DIS 37159).   Comments are due at NFPA on August 7th. 

July 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  US TAG will meet in at NFPA headquarters, September 12-13, 2018

June 2018 Update:

No new business items received from ISO Genève.  The US TAG is planning a September on-site meeting at NFPA Headquarters in Boston.

May 2018 Update:

Balloting was completed by the US TAG on proposed ISO/FDIS 37120 Sustainable Development in Communities – Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life

April 2018 Update:

At the 2017 Paris meeting of TC/268, the UK suggested that it would be helpful to develop an overall maturity model for cities, drawing on the framework set out by SC1 in ISO/DIS 37153. The TC agreed, and WG4 was asked to work up proposals.

At its Berlin meeting in May, WG4 made good progress and recommended a way forward. But in plenary discussion with other working groups, there was concern that WG4 was moving too quickly and on too narrowly‐focused a basis

The purpose of a recent release by ISO TC/268 — an outline of city “maturity models” — is to respond to those concerns, proposing a broader framework for future work in this area across TC/268

ISO TC 268 City Maturity Model Presentation

An explanation of the broad contours of parent standard — with the Association Française de Normalisation (AFNOR Groupas the Secretariat — is described in the videoclip below:

Issue: [14-101] and [18-5]

Category: #SmartCampus, Informatics, Administration & Management

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Christine Fischer, Jack Janveja, John Kaczor, Richard Robben

*  Permission is granted by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to electronically reproduce this draft International Standard for purpose of review and comment related to the preparation of the U.S. position, provided this notice is included.  All other rights are reserved.

Building Automation & Control Networks

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“Universal Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London” | Thomas Abel Prior (1851)

The American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE) has released another candidate revision to ASHRAE 135 Building Automation & Control Networks.   Since the late 1970’s these systems have grown from single building control networks for environment air for a single building into multi-building, multi-vendor campus-wide systems that manage 100’s of thousands of control points that include control of access doors, elevators and exterior lighting.  They lie at the foundation of the emergent #SmartCampus.

Now comes Addendum br which appears to propose more granularity in event articulation:

135-2016br-1. Add new engineering units, p. 3.
135-2016br-2. Add mandate to accept writes of NULL to non-commandable properties, p. 4.
135-2016br-3. Add intrinsic fault reporting to Lighting Output object type, p. 6.
135-2016br-4. Deprecate Time form of timestamps, p. 10
135-2016br-5. Clarify the Multi-state object types when Number_Of_States shrinks, p. 12
135-2016br-6. Fix the language for event type and message text parameters of event notifications, p. 14
135-2016br-7. Clarify the object instance 4194303, p. 16
135-2016br-8. Wildcard instance for Network Port objects in ReadPropertyMultiple requests, p. 17
135-2016br-9. Clarify the timestamp of trend log and trend log multiple log records, p. 18

Comments are due January 20th.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Public Review Drafts Standards web page.

We follow standards action in all codes and standards that govern planning, design, construction. operation and maintenance of mechanical systems within buildings and between buildings and provide an overview every month.   Our next mechanical engineering teleconference is scheduled for January 14th 11 AM EDT.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login credentials at the upper right of our homepage

Issue: [17-230]

Category: #SmartCampus, Electrical, Telecommunications, Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: Eric Albert, David Anderson, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben

 


Posted October 9, 2018

The American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE) has released another candidate revision to ASHRAE 135 Building Automation & Control Networks.   Since the late 1970’s these systems have grown from single building control networks for environment air for a single building into multi-building, multi-vendor campus-wide systems that manage 100’s of thousands of control points that include control of access doors and exterior lighting.  They lie at the foundation of the emergent #SmartCampus.

Now comes Addendum bw which is a proposed response to the need for a simple, universal data exchange format for the transfer of a time-series data between various platforms for operations such as analyzing the energy performance of buildings.  You may access the redline in the link below:

https://osr.ashrae.org/default.aspx

Comments are due October 22nd.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts web page.   We will coordinate our comments with user stakeholders in the education industry during our monthly Mechanical Engineering Codes and Standards teleconference on October 15th. 11 AM EDT.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the login credentials at the upper right of our homepage

LIVE Daily 11:00 AM EST

 


Posted July 16, 2018

The proposed revisions in Addendum bj are focused on the following:

135-2016bj-1. Introduce BACnet Secure Connect Datalink Layer Option
135-2016bj-2. Introduce BACnet/SC in the Network Layer Specifications
135-2016bj-3. Add new Annex YY for the BACnet Secure Connect Datalink Layer Option
135-2016bj-4. Extend the Network Port Object Type for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-5. Add and Extend ASN.1 Types for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-6. New Error Codes for BACnet/SC
135-2016bj-7. Interoperability Specification Extensions for BACnet/SC

 ASHRAE 135 development presents a solid example of an optimal firmware consensus process for the emergent #SmartCampus; in our view.   You may access the redline in the link below:

https://osr.ashrae.org/default.aspx

Comments are due July 16th.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts web page.   We will coordinate our comments with user stakeholders in the education industry during our standing Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the credential in this link: (Weekly Open Door Teleconference Login)

 

Issue: [17-230]

Category: #SmartCampus, Electrical, Telecommunications, Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: David Anderson, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben


From our archive on a related ASHRAE standard:

 


Posted February 12, 2018

The American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE) released its Fourth Public Review Draft of ASHRAE 135 Building Automation & Control Networks.  The purpose of ASHRAE 135 is to define data communication services and protocols for computer equipment used for monitoring and control of HVAC&R and other building systems and to define, in addition, an abstract, object-oriented representation of information communicated between such equipment, thereby facilitating the application and use of digital control technology in buildings.

The proposed revisions are focused on ways for BACnet devices to map analog values onto multiple Binary Value, Binary Output, or Binary Lighting Output objects.  A common use case is in lighting applications, where a level, identified by a numeric value, sets the appropriate values of multiple binary outputs (on or off). Support of this new object type is excluded from all data sharing BIBBs for life safety and access control.   You may access the redline in the link below:

https://osr.ashrae.org/default.aspx

Comments are due February 19th.    You may comment directly on the ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts web page.   We will coordinate our comments with user stakeholders in the education industry during our standing Open Door teleconferences every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Anyone is welcomed to join these teleconferences with the credential in this link: (Weekly Open Door Teleconference Login)

 

Issue: [17-230]

Category: #SmartCampus, Electrical, Telecommunications, Mechanical, Energy, Facility Asset Management

Colleagues: David Anderson, Larry Spielvogel, Richard Robben

 

From our archive (related standard ASHRAE 13):

 

High-Performance Green Buildings

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
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“Hudson River Waterfront” | Colin Campbell Cooper (1913)

With about one hundred technical committees administered by accredited standards developers globally, the stream of standards action in the building energy conservation space is one of the fastest-moving; and a space that demonstrates remarkable adaption.  As the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States the education facility industry is on the receiving end of prescriptive and performance requirements produced by these technical committees that are enforced by state agencies and/or sustainability consortia.

Now comes three more candidate revisions to another fast-moving standard — ASHRAE/ICC/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1 Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings — co-developed (and significantly re-branded recently) by four different organizations that are accessible at the link below:

Public Review Draft Standards / Online Comment Database

To paraphrase some of the issues in play:

Addendum a: The first public review draft added Climate Zones 4A and 4B to those required to meet heat island mitigation criteria in Section 5.3.5.3 for roofs. In response to the first public review, two additional exceptions were added.

Addendum m: This addendum adds new provisions to enable right-sized tubing for efficient delivery of water through hot water distribution systems. The new requirement balances health, energy and plumbing code intents with energy and water efficiency strategies. The addendum is based in part on research by the California Energy Commission on the energy implications of hot water supply. The volume of water in a pipe is the primary determinant of how long a user must wait for hot water to be delivered at a fixture. This has significant implications for both energy use to heat the water and the volume of water wasted before delivery. Similar provisions are currently included in the IECC and the IgCC.

[Comment: This addendum for “right-sized” piping resembles proposals we have made in previous revisions of ASHRAE 90.1; though there are counter-arguments that involve Legionella mitigation]

Addendum n: This addendum clarifies the indoor environmental quality requirements for composite wood and related materials, by adding the recent USEPA’s regulation on composite wood products, requiring that products be certified as meeting the requirements of CARB or USEPA as being manufactured either with ultra-lowemitting formaldehyde resins or no added formaldehyde resins and updating the language on lab certification to make it consistent with the language already in the 189.1-2017 for the other building material categories in Section 8.4.2.

Comments are due January 20th.

We welcome real-time discussion on these and other energy conservation proposals any day at 11 AM Eastern time.   Our next Mechanical Engineering monthly teleconference is scheduled for January 14th, 11 AM.   Use the login credentials at the upper right of our homepage.

Note that the ASHRAE Winter Conference will be hosted in Atlanta, Georgia, January 12-16, 2019.  Since many ASHRAE consensus document technical committees meet during ASHRAE conferences we encourage our colleagues in the education industry to attend.  (CLICK HERE for more information)

 

St. Norbert College

Issue: [Various]

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy

Colleagues:  Eric Albert, Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Standards Georgia

 


Posted October 8, 2018

“New York from Brooklyn” | Colin Campbell Cooper (1910)

With about one hundred technical committees administered by accredited standards developers globally, the stream of standards action in the building energy conservation space is one of the fastest-moving.  As the largest non-residential building construction market in the United States the education facility industry is on the receiving end of prescriptive and performance requirements produced by these technical committees that are enforced by state agencies or sustainability consortia.

At the moment, the four-partner collaboration of the American Society of Heating and Refrigeration Engineers (ASHRAE), the International Code Council (ICC). the United States Green Building  Council (USGBC) and the Illumination Engineering Society (IES) opens the proposals of its technical committees to public review in 30 to 90 day intervals according to ANSI’s Continuous Maintenance process.  Keep in mind that ANSI/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES/ICC Standard 189.1-2017 Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings is not necessarily a safety document but it deserves our attention because it is referenced into ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2016 — Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings which is incorporated by reference into many local, state and national energy conservation laws.

Little Big Horn College

Now comes two more candidate revisions that are accessible at the link below:

Public Review Draft Standards / Online Comment Database

Note that Addendum j and Addendum k are the First Public Review of candidate changes that are significant renewable energy concepts.

Comments are due October 22nd.

We welcome real-time discussion on these and other energy conservation proposals any day at 11 AM Eastern time.   Our next Mechanical Engineering monthly teleconference is scheduled for November 19th, 11 AM.  Even though the deadline for commenting on the proposals listed here will have passed, there is another batch of addenda open for public comment right behind it which we will identify in separate posts.

Use the login credentials at the upper right of our homepage.

Issue: [Various]

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy

Colleagues:  Eric Albert, Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel


Posted August 1, 2018

Grand Valley State University

ASHRAE is an ANSI-accredited continuous-maintenance standards developer (a significant tributary in what we call the regulatory product development “stream”).   Technical committees developing continuous maintenance regulatory products release public review documents in 30-to-90 day intervals.  The technical committee writing ASHRAE 189.1 Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings has released the following redlines for public review:

Addendum f

This addendum replaces the current definition of “construction documents,” which references Standard 90.1, with a definition that is consistent with the 2015 International Green Construction Code. The Standard 90.1 definition does not address building sites or land development which are included in the scope of Standard 189.1.

Addendum g

This addendum replaces the current defined term of “design professional” from Standard 90.1 with “registered design professional,” which is consistent with the terms used in the 2015 International Green Construction Code. Standard 189.1 addresses subject matter for which the traditional titles of architect and engineer, used in the Standard 90.1 definition) do not necessarily align with typical requirements of authorities having jurisdiction. For example, it is common for jurisdictions to have tiered requirements for designer qualifications, often permitting licensed master tradespeople to design certain projects within their respective discipline. The proposed definition also better accommodates specialty design categories such as onsite wastewater system designer, irrigation system designer, landscape designer and soil scientist.

Addendum h

This addendum clarifies that it is the alternate on-site sources of water or municipally reclaimed water are not required to be “acceptable” because it is given that anything not disallowed by an AHJ is acceptable.

All addenda may be found in their entirety at the link below:

ASHRAE Online Standards Actions & Public Review Drafts

Comments are due August 8th.

Technical committees developing ASHRAE codes and standards typically meet face-to-face twice a year at ASHRAE Conferences; the next one in Atlanta, Georgia January 14-16 2019.   We encourage education facility professionals in within driving distance of this conference to attend the ASHRAE technical standards meetings.   Ahead of these conferences we will also host a dedicated markup session for mechanical engineering standards on July 24th, 11:00 AM during which time we will examine and markup documents released for public review by ASHRAE, ASME, AWWA, IAMPO and other organizations developing documents that determine #TotalCostofOwnership of education facilities.

Issue: [Various], ASHRAE

Category: Mechanical, Electrical, Energy, Facility Asset Management, US Department of Energy

Colleagues: Richard Robben, Larry Spielvogel

Link to ANSI Announcement:  ANSI Standards Action (PDF Pages 42-24).


Somerset Community College

NFPA 72 Chapter 14

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

“The Ideal City” | Fra Carnevale (1480)

NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code is a consensus document we identify as a “regulatory product” because is widely incorporated by reference into public safety legislation.   In most jurisdictions it provides a foundation for safety management by elected and appointed public safety official many of whom participate on its technical committees.  Its application is accomplished by a certified cadre of technicians and legions of installation, inspection, testing and maintenance contractors who are also public safety officials who are also on NFPA 72 technical committees.

NFPA 72 has set the standard of care for fire safety signaling in the so-called “intelligent building” zietgest for decades now.  Fire alarm signaling systems have become integrated into many other building systems such as access, environmental air and mass notification.   The integration — and requisite interoperability with consumer products (i.e. hand-held “apps”) — will become no less complex as the emergent #SmartCampus roll outs with the Internet of Things (IoT).   Many non-profit organizations — some of them accredited standards developers; some of them open-source standards developers; some of them neither — are competing for a part of the IoT revenue stream that results from, a) setting the standard, b) educating others about the standard, c) enforcing the standard and, d) sometimes litigating the failure to comply with the standard.

Our advocacy in NFPA 72 dates back to the early 2000’s when the original University of Michigan advocacy enterprise began collaborating with education facility trade associations, government agencies and other user interests.   There are hundreds of fire alarm shops, and thousands of licensed fire alarm technicians in the education facility industry.  We found that managers of this corp of experts needed leadership in supporting in reconciling the competing requirements of safety in economy.   Leadership, in our view, required sustained advocacy that resulted in an increase in safety and a decrease in cost that could be visible on technical shop operating and management budgets.

We were persuasive in making several changes to NFPA 72; most of them subtle editorial clarifications that made NFPA 72 user to use.  Others are not so subtle:

  • Requirement for single-reset in multiple fire alarm system buildings
  • Rationalizing qualifications of fire alarm system inspection, testing & maintenance personnel
  • Clarification of terminology for fire alarm control panel backup power sources

We were not persuasive was in rolling back some of the prescriptive requirements for inspection, testing and maintenance (IT&M) in Chapter 14.  We believe that 15-pages of prescriptive inspection, testing and maintenance tables in Chapter 14 is an area where the user-interest in the education facilities industry should focus its effort to lower its costs.   There are many other locations on the emergent #SmartCampus where the the risk management dollar should be spent.

So, after a one-revision cycle hiatus, the IT&M tables of Chapter 14 is where we will resume our “battle” with almost every interest group that benefits financially from prescriptive IT&M.  As in previous cycles, we will advocate scalable, risk-informed, reliability-centered performance standards that can be accepted by public safety officials.   We will also need data.

Comments are due June 26, 2019

You may begin keying in public input for the 2020 edition independently at the link below:

NFPA 72 Public Input

You will need to set up a (free) NFPA document access account.

Alternatively, you are welcomed to click in to any of our daily teleconferences at 11 AM Eastern time or you  click in to our next Fire Protection Monthly teleconference — January 24th, 11 AM Eastern time — during which time we sweep through the entire constellation of fire protection codes and standards developed by at least 20 other US-based standards developing organizations as well as fire safety standards developed by the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission.

Issue: [7-5] [10-16] [11-42] [15-213] [18-90]

Category: Fire Safety, Public Safety

Colleagues: Mike Anthony, Josh Elvove, Joe DeRosier

 


LEARN MORE:

Link to legacy workspace: Fire Protection for the Education Facilities Industry

NFPA 72 | Class N: Use of campus IP infrastructure for signaling

 

 

Issue: [15-213]

Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities Code

January 16, 2019
mike@standardsmichigan.com
No Comments

It is not soon to begin tooling up to prepare public input for the the 2022 revision of NFPA 150 Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities Code.  Click project landing page linked below:

Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities Code

Public input is due June 26, 2019.  We have been advocating in this document since the 2013 Edition.   We will examine what is new in the 2019 Edition and revisit committee response to our previous advocacy proposals.   All NFPA consensus documents are open for discussion during our daily 11 AM online teleconferences but we harvest all public participation opportunities on fire safety issues once per month; the next meeting to be hosted on February 5th, 11 AM.  Send a request for the advance agenda to bella@standardsmichigan.com.  Use the login credentials at the upper right of our home page.

Issue: [11-1] and [19-5]

Category: Fire Protection, Facility Asset Management, Academic, Risk Management


Posted March 18, 2018

NFPA International has released the Second Draft Report of NFPA 150 Standard on Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities (which, for commercial reasons, will likely change title to: Fire and Life Safety in Animal Housing Facilities Code for the 2019 edition).  From the project prospectus:

This standard shall provide the minimum requirements for the design, construction, fire protection, and classification of animal housing facilities.  The requirements of NFPA 150 recognize the following fundamental principles:

(1) Animals are sentient beings with a value greater than that of simple property.

(2) Animals, both domesticated and feral, lack the ability of self-preservation when housed in buildings and other structures.

(3) Current building, fire, and life safety codes do not address the life safety of the animal occupants.

The requirements found in NFPA 150 are written with the intention that animal housing facilities will continue to be designed, constructed, and maintained in accordance with the applicable building, fire, and life safety codes. The requirements herein are not intended to replace or rewrite the basic requirements for the human occupants. Instead, NFPA 150 provides additional minimum requirements for the protection of the animal occupants and the human occupants who interact with those animals in these facilities.

NFPA 150 is open for NITMAM until March 22nd.   This means that the public may respond to the Second Draft Report and challenge any of the technical committee’s decisions in front of the NFPA Standards Council at the NFPA Annual Conference & Expo, June 11-14th, in Las Vegas.

Because many large research universities have significant revenue drivers that involve laboratory animals the original University of Michigan codes and standards advocacy enterprise (collaborating with trade associations and subject matter experts at the Evergreen State University) advocated for practical approaches to ensuring animal life safety without putting the US research industry at risk of being non-competitive with university-affiliated research enterprises in other nations where laboratory animals are treated with a different standard of care.

We supported prevailing arguments against vendor over-reach — i.e. the tendency for well funded stakeholders to build a revenue stream through the standards development process.  We recommended forestalling the expansion of fire safety technologies into a broader classification of laboratory animals and were granted that recommendation until the next NFPA 150 revision cycle.  We were granted that request.

Leadership at US research universities assume that funding participation of compliance, enforcement and risk management professionals fairly represents their cost-control agenda. It does not.  It should be obvious, from the NFPA 159 technical committee roster, which interest groups benefit from participating in the meetings:

NFPA 150 Technical Committee Roster

Not one college or university is participating; despite the size of university-affiliated research enterprises.

Immunology and Regenerative Medicine Research Laboratory – University o

All NFPA consensus documents are on the standing agenda of our weekly Open Door teleconference — every Wednesday, 11 AM Eastern Time.  Click here to log in.

Issue: [11-1]

Category: Fire Protection, Facility Asset Management, Academic, Risk Management


* Link to previous University of Michigan-led advocacy: Issue [11-1]

 

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